Author Topic: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer  (Read 17593 times)

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #270 on: September 11, 2017, 09:17:22 PM »
Congratulations to Big Muff and hugs for Ally.

I'm still waiting for a date for my assessment.  I sent my forms in nearly two months ago.  My GP seems certain that what he's told them will do the trick, but I never though to ask him what rate he thought I'd get.  But what others are saying here is keeping my hopes up.

I get frustrated over communication problems on the phone to call centres with my poor sound discrimination and I'm dreading the assessment, but I realise that by comparison with Ally, I'm lucky.  I think it's disgusting their system isn't compatible with NGT lite. 

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #271 on: September 11, 2017, 10:38:25 PM »
Ally and Sunny  >hugs< >hugs<

ally

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #272 on: September 12, 2017, 08:44:12 AM »
Thank you.  I'll let everyone know how it goes tomorrow.  My husband says its for POA over me so he can answer the phones on my behalf.  Why havent the Dwp thought about this before now?  The pip forms are not on line due to the bar code procedure, as far as I know?  I'm not the only profoundly deaf person this will affect.  Due to the cuts in cab, social workers for the deaf etc, many deaf will struggle with the forms too.  Understanding the English will be too difficult for them

I started typing the answers to  the pip questions on a word app months ago.  I have all my medical stuff scanned, copied, number coordinated, and in plastic folders ready to send, before  the forms arrive.  Therefore, I'm pretty well organised compared to many.  However, I wasn't contemplating this obstacle. POA over me is something I didn't expect.  I feel as though my rights as a person is being violated.somehow.  See how it goes tomorrow.  Thanks  >bighugs<

KizzyKazaer

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #273 on: September 12, 2017, 11:54:50 AM »
Quote
I have all my medical stuff scanned, copied, number coordinated, and in plastic folders ready to send, before  the forms arrive.


 >thumbsup< and hope you get a good award after all the malarkey!!  >x-fingers<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #274 on: September 12, 2017, 12:48:12 PM »
I just had a word with AHL  (= RNID).

They gave me a 'test' email for the DWP:

rfp1.pilot@DWP.GSI.gov.uk

(I'm not sure about the upper and lower case, but I don't think it matters, does it?)

Anyway, even if Maximus/Capita won't use it, maybe when dealing with the DWP decision makers it would work?

Big Muff

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #275 on: September 12, 2017, 03:51:52 PM »
I just had a word with AHL  (= RNID).

They gave me a 'test' email for the DWP:

rfp1.pilot@DWP.GSI.gov.uk

(I'm not sure about the upper and lower case, but I don't think it matters, does it?)

Anyway, even if Maximus/Capita won't use it, maybe when dealing with the DWP decision makers it would work?
i'd be amazed if that e-mail address is for the use of the general public tbh due to the "pilot" reference. You would need to check with whoever supplied you with it what guidance had been issued for its use.
Capita etc did not have access to DWP e-mail accounts a couple of years ago & doubt that has changed though who knows these days

Big Muff

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #276 on: September 12, 2017, 04:01:37 PM »
Thank you.  I'll let everyone know how it goes tomorrow.  My husband says its for POA over me so he can answer the phones on my behalf.  Why havent the Dwp thought about this before now?  The pip forms are not on line due to the bar code procedure, as far as I know?  I'm not the only profoundly deaf person this will affect.  Due to the cuts in cab, social workers for the deaf etc, many deaf will struggle with the forms too.  Understanding the English will be too difficult for them

I started typing the answers to  the pip questions on a word app months ago.  I have all my medical stuff scanned, copied, number coordinated, and in plastic folders ready to send, before  the forms arrive.  Therefore, I'm pretty well organised compared to many.  However, I wasn't contemplating this obstacle. POA over me is something I didn't expect.  I feel as though my rights as a person is being violated.somehow.  See how it goes tomorrow.  Thanks  >bighugs<
so the DWP what you to grant POA simply due to the fact they cant "talk" to you on the phone !
The POA doesn't take effect until registered with the court of protection  anyway so assume it is a notional POA  just for their purposes.

Have to say I did the telephone section of the claim for the wife but she did "confirm" her identity - she said "yes" when asked if she was Mrs Air and she wanted me to act on her behalf <laugh> tbf had a sensible agent who could see that her communication difficulties were a large part of the existing DLA claim.

ally

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #277 on: September 12, 2017, 04:41:51 PM »
Sunny thanks  for the test email for the Dwp.  I didn't use it, due to some on the B&W trying it, and had problems with it.  Apparently, the forms either didn't arrive, or, arrived too late.  It seems hit and miss.  I wanted everything out of the way, with no restrictions.  As soon as the forms arrive, I intend to fill them in ASAP.  The typed out answers will be attached to the form, and sent off within a couple of days.  The less stressed out I am the better.  It plays havoc with my pain levels. 

It's just Sod's law that I've hit the obstacle with being unable to use a phone.  What amazes me, is the fact that the Dwp haven't thought about the population of deaf in the U.K. who will be scuppered that way.  Will every deaf person be visited by the Dwp with forms to fill in for the POA?  If so, their staff levels will be depleted, if they're out of the office  visiting the deaf.  It's crazy!!

KK I'll need more then a gold award after this malarkey.  I thought I had everything covered.  I thought wrong  >bighugs<

ally

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #278 on: September 13, 2017, 03:51:50 PM »
The DWP worker duly arrived this morning.  The Dwp department that deals with the calls for changeover from dla to pip had asked her to call about POA over me.  She spent some time talking to my husband, and, apologised for wasting our morning.  Since I'm not suffering from dementia. Nor do I have a learning disability, being deaf doesn't mean I need a POA.  She took all the details of the difficulties we had trying to ring the number on the pip form, and, promised to see what she can do.

I think the deaf, and others who need to,  should be allowed to apply for pip on line.  However, what I think, and what the Dwp think, are two different matters entirely.   I knew from what I'd read about implementing pip,  that the deaf would have issues applying by phone.  Surely, they could've sorted it out by now.  I'm waiting to see what happens with the above.  So far, if I need to contact the department again, I'm still going to have the same issues.  I'll let you know what transpires with the above, if anything.  Thanks for the support  >bighugs<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #279 on: September 13, 2017, 04:19:19 PM »
The irony is that as I understand it, UC has to be applied for online. It seems to be random which benefits you can apply for which way, and certainly not to make anything better or easier for anyone.

I thought about my PIP application and how someone in a centre somewhere is supposed to scan every page into the system.  I bet some of my pages got lost.  Imagine if I could have emailed it as an attachment or sent it on a disk.

Oh well, hopefully you'll get there in the end. 

I'm afraid that after hoping from what my GP said that I wouldn't need an assessment, I'm rather maliciously hoping not only that I'll get one but that I'll be able to ask the assessor to repeat everything over and over and over again and write stuff down etc.  Horrible, but the mood I'm in.  PIP's supposed to be for people with a variety of extra needs but the system doesn't cater for extra needs.  Surreal.  I know that some of what's going on is just backdoor cuts, but it isn't all that.

Oh well, fingers crossed Ally.

ally

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #280 on: September 13, 2017, 04:57:14 PM »
Sunny, I'm actually smiling and nodding in agreement, imagining you causing the assessor as much grief as possible.  Obviously, I hope you won't need a f to f.  However, if you do, I hope you do what you've promised.  In my case, I'll need an interpeter, and my husband present.  It's guaranteed I won't hear the assessor.  I can't even hear myself.  I don't always follow interpreters  either.  If I'm stressed, or, the meds make me woozy, my concentration goes out of the window.  I might end up doing what you've suggested, not out of choice, but, necessity.  I'm convinced that the changeover from dla to pip is made as stressful as possible for all claimants.  It stinks.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #281 on: September 13, 2017, 11:01:52 PM »
I've a clinical appointment tomorrow.  Keep your fingers crossed for me - the last time I went to this clinic they 'lost' me for about 3 hours after not passing the message on to wave vigorously and shout very loudly in the very large, very crowded, very noisy waiting room.  Still, it could be worse - there was the clinic where nobody told me that the doctor had a buzzer.  It was nearly an hour before someone found me sitting in a totally empty waiting room with the building about to be closed for the night.  At least in this clinic, the doctor will send a letter to my GP so I can find out afterwards what he's said.  That may be useful, just as it was on the occasion when I attended hospital having broken a bone and returned home thinking they'd said I hadn't.  Oops! 

ally

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #282 on: September 14, 2017, 09:14:29 AM »
Hope it goes well.   >x-fingers<  I can totally empathise with you.  I can't go to any appointments alone due to the issues you've mentioned.  I left hospital after my accident thinking I'd had a plate and scew job on my fractured hip.  It wasn't until my follow up appointment with the consultant after discharge,  that I discovered I had my hip replaced.  Years ago I had a cleaning job.  The Hoover wouldn't suck up, but I decided to continue cleaning the office I was in.  A man at his desk give me some strange looks, but, I ignored them.  It wasnt until I went to unplug the Hoover, that I realised it wasn't  plugged in.   >biggrin<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #283 on: September 14, 2017, 09:24:51 PM »
I had the day from hell.  At least unlike one clinic I went to years ago, they didn't leave me somewhere, accidentally forget about me, and lock up for the night.  But when I realised no one else was being called through and the only people left in the waiting room were 3 companions waiting for patients, I worked out I'd been forgotten again.

What hurts most isn't the lack of adjustments, it's the knowledge I've no one to go with me.  No family or close friends.  I tried to find out beforehand about lipspeakers but the nearest one is in another town, and I don't know how you book her.  I don't think you can even book an ordinary carer from an agency without being a regular client. 

In all seriousness, I think that if I need to go to a similar clinic in future I'll go private.  The clinical care won't be better than NHS but for extra money they'd probably have a smaller waiting room and better systems for calling people through.

KizzyKazaer

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #284 on: September 14, 2017, 09:39:21 PM »
Sorry you had that experience, Sunny - and it shouldn't be so bad that you have to consider paying privately  >doh< >thumbsdown<