Author Topic: Vilification of disabled workers by the government  (Read 194 times)

Sunny Clouds

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Vilification of disabled workers by the government
« on: December 09, 2017, 05:20:18 PM »
In case anyone missed it, Philip Hammond recently told the Treasury Select Committee:  “It is almost certainly the case that by increasing participation in the workforce, including far higher levels of participation by marginal groups and very high levels of engagement in the workforce, for example of disabled people – something we should be extremely proud of – may have had an impact on overall productivity measurements.”

So on the one hand, the government makes a big issue of its being absolutely essential that no one is ever better off out of work (pretty much guaranteeing it that many will take that as meaning not that the same person should be better off in work than out, but that nobody out of work should ever get more than people on minimum wage with such minimal benefits as they're entitled to even if their needs are less);  and on the other hand, it's telling people that disabled people in work are at least in part responsible for the state of the economy.

I struggle not to cry over this sort of vilification.  I no longer believe that it is accidental.  I simply hope that the government will keep it at this level of unpleasantness not worse, and that I'm simply overly depressive.

auntieCtheM

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Re: Vilification of disabled workers by the government
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2017, 05:28:18 PM »
That is a very mean thing to say.  So a man without legs is not such a productive telephonist as an able-bodied woman who is also a telephonist for the same firm??

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Vilification of disabled workers by the government
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2017, 05:44:06 PM »
It certainly seems to me to be calculated to generate hostility rather than being simply an appalling and pathetic 'excuse' for the poor state of the economy.

SteveX

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Re: Vilification of disabled workers by the government
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2017, 08:12:44 PM »
It certainly seems to me to be calculated to generate hostility rather than being simply an appalling and pathetic 'excuse' for the poor state of the economy.
I agree, hate mongering it is.    as if we don't have it bad enough already.
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lankou

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Re: Vilification of disabled workers by the government
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2017, 08:45:19 PM »
Comment on the Disability News Service:-

Live links at link:-

https://www.disabilitynewsservice.com/outrage-after-chancellor-blames-disabled-people-for-uks-economic-woes/


Outrage after chancellor blames disabled people for UK’s economic woes

By John Pring  on  December 7, 2017   Employment

The chancellor of the exchequer is facing calls to apologise after he made “disgraceful” comments that blamed disabled people for the country’s poor economic performance.

Philip Hammond’s comments to the Treasury select committee yesterday (Wednesday) came just days after his government launched its new 10-year Improving Lives strategy, which aims to find jobs for one million more disabled people by 2027.

Those attacking his comments included the Disabled Police Association, which described them as “unfair (and inaccurate)”, while Labour’s shadow minister for disabled people, Marsha de Cordova, said they were “disgraceful”.

Hammond (pictured) had been asked by the committee to explain the reasons for the country’s low levels of productivity growth.

He told the MPs: “It is almost certainly the case that by increasing participation in the workforce, including far higher levels of participation by marginal groups, very high levels of engagement in the workforce, for example of disabled people – something we should be extremely proud of – we may have had an impact on the overall productivity measurements.”

The Treasury had not said by 1pm today (Thursday) whether Hammond would be apologising for his comments.

A leading disabled consultant, Tracey Proudlock, described the comments on Twitter as “disgraceful”.

The Disabled Police Association said, also on Twitter: “It’s more difficult for disabled people to find employment than non-disabled – unfair (and inaccurate) for those who are working & paying taxes to be blamed for holding back the economy.”

Stephen Brookes, a coordinator of the Disability Hate Crime Network, said they were “the most insulting, disgraceful, anti-disabled comments made by a senior politician for years”.

Brookes said Hammond’s words were “not even supportable by reality and facts”, and he added: “The amount of disabled people who work hard and often for lower than equal wages to counterparts is a massive contribution to all local and national services.

“The damage to disabled people’s dynamism is immense.

“No wonder faith in, and respect for, statutory bodies and politicians and their duty of care to minority groups and their value to society is crumbling.”

De Cordova asked the Commons deputy speaker yesterday if Hammond would be making a statement and issuing an apology to MPs for his comments “scapegoating disabled people as a reason for low productivity”.

In a statement, she said: “As a disabled person I am shocked and appalled that Philip Hammond is trying to blame me and other disabled people for the Tories’ economic failure.

“He should apologise immediately for this disgraceful comment.”

One disabled campaigner, Nicky Clark, said on Twitter: “God this is exhausting. Is there NOTHING disabled people aren’t blamed for?”

David Gillon, one of the most prominent critics of the government’s much-criticised Disability Confident employment scheme, said on Twitter: “When @PhilipHammondUK claimed disabled people lower #UK productivity, he was making same claim used to force me out of my aerospace engineering career. With same absence of evidence.

“Yet #disabilityconfident insists workplace #disability #discrimination doesn’t happen.”

Anita Bellows, a researcher with Disabled People Against Cuts, added: “I am wondering how many businesses are going to sign up to the #DisabilityConfident campaign today.”

Philippa Barraclough was another to criticise the comments on  Twitter, saying: “This is one of the most disgusting things I have ever heard!

“As someone who is living with #learningdifficulties & who is #partiallysighted I find this disgusting. I am in employment… [would]quitting my #job be better for the #economy?”