Author Topic: How to speed healing  (Read 1362 times)

Fiz

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2017, 01:40:06 PM »
Different wound, shorter. Stitched initially by a paramedic. I didn't see the nurse to have them removed with the initial appointment as there was a yellowy discharge that made me think it might not be ready for stitch removal. Day 14, Sunday was the second day of a clean dressing so I removed the stitches. One small circle opened, small button sized but otherwise all three parallel cuts are healed. I've been having Epsom salts baths and using sterile plasters since. I'm under shared care at present so being seen by the mental health team daily and today's cpn turned up with a doctor which gave me kittens as I thought I was two thirds of the way to being locked up but it turned out the doctor wanted to check my wound.

It's sloughy which apparently means there's some bacteria which may hinder healing but there's no heat, redness or swelling so the doctor said it's so localised my body is fighting it off. Tomorrow's nurse will be bringing a swab to check which bacteria and whether it needs antibiotics.

But I've Googled sloughy and every site talks about debridement which you have to do with slough or it won't heal. I'm now completely terrified. I'm not into pain and that sounds painful. And I realise that's a stupid statement considering how I got the cut in the first place!

Any experience of sloughy wounds? As it's small, might they just leave it or will it have to be debrided? Or however you spell it.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #16 on: April 11, 2017, 03:52:36 PM »
There's quite a variety, not least because the outer layer of skin comes off anyway unless there's a problem, so once the wound heals, it may just come away like a scab.  It could also gently rub off on the dressing.  So don't assume it means they've got to do lots of horrid stuff.

Well, not unless the doctor turns up with an industrial grade sander he's borrowed from the builder next door.   >devil<

Seriously, though, don't panic.  If they think there's likely to be any significant pain in relation to anything they do, they'll want to anaesthetise the area.  If they didn't care that much, they wouldn't be keeping an eye on you like this.

As regards the cuts in general, I'm just sort of hoping that if, over time, your life improves and your physical and mental health improve, cutting won't be something you'll find helpful.  But given that it's something you do, I'm pleased you've got healthcare professionals that appear to be doing what they can to look after you and that you feel ok to come here and share so we can give you hugs.  They don't debride physical wounds but I've found Ouchy hugs helpful at debriding some of my mental wounds.

 >bighugs< >bighugs< >bighugs<
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2017, 04:53:47 PM »
But I've Googled sloughy and every site talks about debridement which you have to do with slough or it won't heal. I'm now completely terrified. I'm not into pain and that sounds painful. And I realise that's a stupid statement considering how I got the cut in the first place!

Debridement is carried out under local anaesthetic, Fiz. I've needed it a few times after ... well, you know. I've never had it carried out on a wound that's already been stitched, though, only beforehand, so they may decide it's not necessary.  >hugs<