Author Topic: My call-up papers have arrived  (Read 4389 times)

SteveX

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #60 on: April 01, 2018, 11:45:37 AM »
I stapled mine inside, yes I know it's old fashioned but I guarantee they didn't lose them ;)

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Fiz

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #61 on: April 01, 2018, 12:24:18 PM »
I didn't fasten my letters of evidence together because I've nothing here to do so. I am slightly worried about that. I have written my National Insurance number at the top of each page though so I just hope it all stays together.

I hope it's not long until I have a date for the consultation, I'm having the hebee jeebies.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #62 on: April 01, 2018, 12:51:24 PM »
They're scanned in the print room, not sent to the department as papers, so it's not a matter of the fastener keeping them from getting separated in the internal post, and I'd have thought that someone in the post room that drops a page would be as likely to do it as they separate the pages to scan them as when pulling them out of the envelope, so it seems to me that the only real virtue to fastening them together (which I did) is to make sure that no pages get accidentally left in the envelope.

I've suddenly thought - I'm glad I didn't go into total manic meltdown over my PIP paperwork as opposed to a depressive crash, because there's a serious possibility that if I'd thought of it, I'd have sent every single page signed for.  Nothing like being manic.  Let me think now, what does signed-for cost?  £6.50-ish?  Times 100 pages?  Yup, that would be suitably manic craziness, £650-odd spent on postage.  Well, I didn't go manic, but I wonder how many people do go over the top and do absurd things like that.  As it is, if you'd seen the paperwork with all the obsessive headers, footers, headings, sub-headings, numberings etc.  Aargh!
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

KizzyKazaer

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #63 on: April 01, 2018, 04:52:20 PM »
And somewhere, an unfortunate DWP decision maker sobs quietly over Sunny's claim...

Sunny Clouds

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #64 on: April 01, 2018, 06:22:34 PM »
I actually feel quite sorry for a lot of them.  Obviously, there will be some that enjoy being nasty or are judgemental so-and-sos, but my inclination is to suppose that a fair few of them don't like what they're part of but know that if they don't, their jobs are on the line via performance appraisals, and that if they walk out they'll be sanctioned if they apply for UC, and if they're sacked for supposedly not doing their job properly there's also a risk they'll be sanctioned.  But how many other jobs are there out there that they can get?  Parts of the media have gone all-out for years to convince us that civil servants are lazy and incompetent, so that doesn't make them attractive to a lot of employers.

Having said that, I wish that when trying to meet their targets, they'd come up with more plausible reasons for refusing points for things.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Monic1511

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #65 on: April 01, 2018, 06:44:06 PM »
re DWP staff - the dwp is one of the few places that takes on disabled people so you have staff who are visually impaired, have seizures, are on dialysis and have all the types of conditions the rest of us have, yes that should make them more understanding but it also brings out the "well if I can cope why cant you" in people.   I have to pull myself up when someone sits in front of me and tells me they cannot possibly be fit for work as they had one epileptic seizure once a year and no they don't keep a diary and they cant tell me their medication or the type of seizure.  "What do you mean what type of seizure did I have, I had a seizure" - there are 40 different types of seizures and I don't know them all either,   I promise I am not trying to be judgemental but when you have daily seizures its hard to control your tongue.

As for attachments - they will be scanned and as long as your name and NINO are on all of them everything should end up on the dwp assessors screen.

 >bighugs<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #66 on: April 01, 2018, 07:28:17 PM »
I remember reading an article a couple of years or so back by a GP blogger about how he'd got a picture of Stephen Hawking on his surgery wall to remind patients that if he could work, so could they.  Amongst the comments under the blog, including comments by other doctors who gave their names, were comments to the effect that an awful lot of disabled people can't get the level of support they need to be able to work, and most can't earn enough to pay for the level of support that Hawking got.

There's an issue, for example, that I get very ranty about on a non-disability messageboard I go on where I'd say that those with the biggest mouths and the most posts are typically White UK middle class, degree level education with quite a few posters with masters and doctorates, or solid trades followed by managerial experience.  When someone comes out with comments of the 'surely no one could be that stupid' variety, I often say well, yes, have you looked at an intelligence bell-curve recently?

Likewise I happened to mention to a friend one day that my father had had a very successful career based on no GCSE equivalents at all, just some basic office skills and an entry-level English test.  Ah, but he was very intelligent, she said.  I said yes, but that's not what he built his career on - he was a fantastic decision-maker and had an amazing memory.  But most people with his lack of qualifications wouldn't be able to build a career like his.

You could look at me and say "Well, she looked after her parents, so why can't she work?"  Maybe at some point in the not terribly distant future I'll get back to work, but to be blunt about it, whilst my diagnosable mental illnesses and diagnosable neurological problems and sensory impairments keep the ESA people off my back, the thing that stopped me applying for more paid work was fear.  Yes, I was too much of a coward to put up with the derision of the CMHT both when I applied for work and when I lost it.  Then when I was discharged I was terrified that if I went back to work I might go into total meltdown and find myself back in the 'care' of the CMHT.  It was shortly after discharge that I started looking after my elderly mother, dying of cancer and registrably blind albeit with a little vision, then after my father. 

But in all the work I've done except the Territorial Army, it was like school in that I was bullied and scapegoated and taken advantage of.   A penny dropped a couple of years ago that it doesn't just happen in paid work, it happens in voluntary work.  I tried to work out how many working-year equivalents of my life have been devoted to voluntary work with no testimonial or certificate or even a thank-you card at the end of it. 

So I know that I'm vulnerable in the workplace and sure as hell the mental health services won't ever help with that, or even if they wanted to, I'd never trust them.  I have been emotionally abused by a psychiatrist who turned me from someone who'd picked themself up again over and over and over to someone who gave up, someone who was so frightened of the local CMHT and inpatient unit, they were no longer prepared to take any risks at all.

And whereas I now will tell people that, there are plenty out there that won't say it, or even recognise what their fears are.  They may be frightened of a fit that no one will help them with.  They may be frightened of a fall no one will pick them up from.  They may be frightened of the depression that will stop them coping.  They may be frightened, as I am, of being bullied and taken advantage of.

I've mentioned my falls here.  My distress over people's reactions has far outweighed my other distress.  Repeated physical injuries have been as nothing against people laughing, staring, shouting, insulting, accusing, shoving etc.  But if I said when it was at its worst I was scared to go out and risk falling over,  someone could have thought "But the falls aren't that bad." 

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Monic1511

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #67 on: April 01, 2018, 08:14:24 PM »
Sunny Clouds
Iím sorry if I upset you. I think I meant to say we are all guilty of making snap judgments based on our own experiences and it takes discipline and compassion to not make decisions that way.

When Iím tired and fed up I might think that if I can do something so can another but itís only if you know the full story you can make informed decisions and I think thatís where Dwp decision makers make mistakes.

Hawking was held up as an example but no one mentioned his carers who enabled him. If all of us had that level of support we would all be able to do everything we wanted to. We know itís never gonna happen especially when there was a report in todayís news saying that there are thousands of disabled children being denied the basic education that is their legal right.

Fiz I think this is the hardest bit waiting for medical and the process. The only section that seems to go quickly is the AA decision makers who can sometimes turn a decision round in 2 weeks. Mind you that tends to be for folk over 76.
 >dove<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #68 on: April 01, 2018, 08:55:14 PM »
Monic, no, you didn't upset me.  I just started thinking about related things and posted accordingly.

If anyone shows understanding of others and kindness towards others, it's you.

 >dove<
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

ally

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #69 on: April 01, 2018, 09:46:46 PM »
The department where I worked at the Dwp there were those who had seizures , partially sighted, hearing impaired, diabetics, heart and lung transplant, MS, and many more disabilities.  we were only allowed two weeks sick per year.  It didn't matter why you were on  the sick.  You could have as many sick notes as you wanted.  You would still get a bad sick record for any more than the allocated amount of sick days.  I had two failed spinal operation while working there.  when I returned to work, the first time.  i knew I couldn't have any more sick for at least one year.  The second spinal operation I didn't get paid, due to the four year rule.  My second operation was before the four year period.  After one months sick I had to have  a medical with ATOS.  It was decided I was fit for work.  Therefore, I returned to work before I was well enough. 

My spinal issues worsened.  After steroid injections, nerve root blocks. And, facet ablations,  I was offered a SCS trial  Luckily, voluntary redundancy came up, and I took that.  Had I not, I've no doubt, that after a further four spinal intervention, and, my accident where I had the head of my femur/hip, and elbow fracture I would've been asked to leave.  While working there I had timed breaks.  I was allowed ten minutes to get to the toilet, and, the kitchen for a coffee.  My mobility was so bad at one point, I couldn't do it within the allocated ten minutes. Also, sitting for long periods of time, was aggravating  my spine.  I was then sent for a talk with my line manager about time management.  Not long after that, the staff were moved around into different desks.  Mine was even further away from the toilet and kitchen.  Therefore, working for the DWP was no picnic believe me.  Some of the staff, including myself were in a worse state than some of those on ESA


Monic1511

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #70 on: April 02, 2018, 02:45:52 PM »
Ally
you said " Therefore, working for the DWP was no picnic believe me.  Some of the staff, including myself were in a worse state than some of those on ESA"  I have several colleagues who are ex dwp and know that many of the staff are in worse health than some ESA people, it just I find it hard to remain impartial and couldn't do the decision makers job.

 >dove<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #71 on: April 02, 2018, 03:41:11 PM »
Quote
I find it hard to remain impartial and couldn't do the decision makers job.

Ditto.

But then I think that overall, vast numbers of jobs that either are civil service in the  broadest sense or the privatised equivalents are horrendous.  The way people are treated is disgusting.

Please forgive me if I do a side rant about the 'jobsworth' stereotype perpetrated by parts of the media.  If you say that, what sort of person do you picture?  Maybe someone working in the DWP or for your local council?

Here's my example.  You put your money in a parking meter and come back a bit late.  The warden gives you a ticket.  They're a 'jobsworth' according to all sorts of media outlets from tabloids to money-saving sites.  So anyway, in your local shopping area, local people bully the warden into giving them an extra five minutes as the norm.  But then someone wants six, seven, eight etc.

If they say no, they're a 'jobsworth'.  Well, actually, their job's probably been privatised, they've got ridiculous difficult-to-meet targets and if they don't meet them, they'll probably lose their job.  Is your 'need' to park an extra five minutes worth their job?

Meanwhile, here's the best bit.  They didn't make the rules anyway.  So what you're asking that 'jobsworth' to do that would put their job on the line for you is to do someone else's job, namely that of your elected councillors.  And if those councillors lose their jobs by not being voted in next time and they sign on, they won't be sanctioned because it will be seen as the vicissitudes of politics.

DWP staff get the same flak.  They're 'jobsworths'.  Well, I hate what's being done to sick, disabled, disadvantaged, jobless, struggling and exploited people by our government, and I take it very personally  because of how it's affected me, but it's more than the DWP employee's job's worth not to meet their targets, so I try not to make too many assumptions about the individuals that make the decisions as opposed to the system.

I still find it expletive difficult.

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

KizzyKazaer

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #72 on: April 02, 2018, 04:54:00 PM »
Definitely it's systems not individuals, in most cases, that deserve the flak - speaking of course as another ex-DWP worker.  Ally, I didn't know (or maybe I'd forgotten!) that you'd been part of 'the Department' as well - reading about your timed breaks and the ridiculous restrictions on visiting the toilet etc, did you work in the dreaded call centre?  I was offered a position in one of those when my benefit processing job was moved some fifty miles away as part of the >rude word< mass centralisation that was taking place back in 200-whatever year it was.  Not being so well at the time, I declined...

Really, I can't see how those sort of 'everything on a timer' environments are suitable for a lot of disabled people anyway - some of us just can't do things as quickly as people who aren't living with particular impairments, so unless 'reasonable adjustments' are made (and doesn't sound like they were for you, in any shape or form >thumbsdown<) then I'd say jobs like that are just not an option.  Personally, I'd rather have my teeth extracted without anaesthetic than work in a call centre!

ally

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #73 on: April 02, 2018, 05:59:45 PM »
Kizzy,  yes, it was the call centre dealing with benefits.  I did the administration side of things.  Letters, emails etc.  Some of the other administrators worked away from the call centre.  Many of these were hearing, who didn't like answering the phone.  They'd get a GP letter every year stating they couldn't work on the phones due to health reasons.  Of course, I was profoundly deaf, so, couldn't use a phone full stop.  I was classed as part of the call centre, and tied to their rules and regulations.  Hence the ten minutes break for kitchen and toilets.

During staff meetings with an interpreter (I did have that). I would listen in horror at what those on the phones had to put up with.  Some eventually suffered from extreme stress, and, anxiety. Everything was read off a script.  Even if you'd told the claimant everything you could, you still had to ask if there was anything else you could help them with.  If not you were downmarked.  Therefore, Kizzy, i don't blame you for your last remark.  im glad you never worked in a call centre, and for once I was glad I was deaf. 

Monic,  I couldn't do a DM job either.   As sunny has pointed out, If you're working for the Dwp, or, any organisation, you need to abide by the rules, no matter how Unpalatable they are.  The DM, or, any other Dwp employee are only doing the job they're paid for.  Nothing else.

KizzyKazaer

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Re: My call-up papers have arrived
« Reply #74 on: April 02, 2018, 08:57:21 PM »
Oh yes, Ally, I remember learning from my existing call-centre colleagues about 'the script'!  Sheesh, what with that and the timed loo visits, the DWP might as well employ robots to do those jobs, because it's no way to treat human beings   >angry<  I wouldn't be surprised if the next big idea by remote managers is to limit consumption of tea/coffee/water so the number of toilet breaks can be slashed, pardon the pun...

Meanwhile, hoping you're recovering OK from the ghastly form-filling, auntie!