Author Topic: Discussion - equality for people with disabilities at concerts  (Read 351 times)

Fiz

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Discussion - equality for people with disabilities at concerts
« on: January 24, 2018, 06:00:40 PM »
I just wondered what everybody thought about this

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-42776454

My first thought is the management company has (once a lawyer was involved) provided a BSL interpreter for the main act and feel a bit sorry for them for now being sued because the interpreter wasn't funded for the supporting acts but I think this is more about setting a precedent for all concerts, that they provide for people with disabilities and this is what the Mum is trying to change.

But where do we stop? With my spinal deformities and neuropathic pain I cannot stand for long without severe pain so I could never go into the standing area of a concert and in the past have bought seated tickets for concerts. However people in seats often choose to stand meaning the people behind either also stand or can't see the act. Like me. So I'd given up on concerts as a lost cause despite being a MAJOR Pink fan and she's touring over here this year  >crying<

But does this mean that the concert management have to make sure I can see in my seat, had I had such a ticket? If this legal action sets a precedent management companies will need to make more and more adjustments for people with all the different disabilities.

ally

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Re: Discussion - equality for people with disabilities at concerts
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2018, 10:24:40 PM »


It's not just concerts it's across the board.  Do I sue the school that forced me into a hearing school that specialised in music.  The church, where no interpreters have been available for services.  Concerts like those below.  Hospitals, where even recently, interpreters haven't been booked.  They don't book interpreters for concerts such as little mix, as they don't expect deaf people to be there.  I don't hear music at all.  All I get is the beat through my body.  I can't follow words to music, as I don't get it.  Therefore, the only thing the deaf mum, and her friends would've got from the concert would be visual.   She could've got that by just watching the show,

Personally, I think having an interpreter in the stage right next to Little Mix could be off putting for those hearing.  She was offered a carer ticket to take an interpreter with her.  I've often used my husband at shows. I only go to keep him company.   He signs the words to songs to me while sitting next to me.  I didn't need him to stand on the stage to do it.  I think she wants the compensation more than anything else. Others on here may have a different opinion

I have booked seats at theatres and concerts before in seats reserved for those in wheelchairs. During most concerts, everyone rises to their feet, and I'm left staring at rows of bums.  Someone's backside in my face is not what I want  to see,  Fizz makes a valid point that if this legal action sets a precedent management companies will need to make more and more adjustments for people with all the different disabilities.  If so, how will they implement them? Wait and see.


Fiz

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Re: Discussion - equality for people with disabilities at concerts
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2018, 07:14:51 AM »
I totally agree Ally. It will be interesting to find out whether the legal action she's taking against the management company for not providing an interpreter for the 2 support acts comes to anything or whether she will lose her case. I guess she foots her legal costs if she loses?

Sunshine Meadows

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Re: Discussion - equality for people with disabilities at concerts
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2018, 01:22:12 PM »
Looking at the photo in the article then reading the story brought out the bias in me. Sort of like middle class entitlement blah blah blah. I think there does need to be some adjustments eg say a wheelchair platform - raised area for wheelchair users to sit in the wheelchairs and have a view that cant be obscured by bums. However I do agree with what has already been said about how far adjustments can be taken.

Given that the people who cant afford tickets at near the stage end up viewing much of the concert on the big screen it would make sense to me to have one screen that has signing or subtitles on it too. I have never been to a concert but my impression is that it is as much about the crowds react to the music and other people as it is about what is happening on stage.