Author Topic: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.  (Read 517 times)


Monic1511

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2018, 09:32:46 PM »
This Form IS NOT Mandatory so if you don't like the format don't use it.   Its similar to the old GL24 but as long as you put this phrase in any written / typed letter the request is acceptable and the DWP cannot refuse it.
"I wish to request a mandatory reconsideration of the decision dated xx/xx/2018 regarding PIP/ESA/etc.  You have failed to consider"

if your request is sent in more than one month after the decision date but not more than One year and a day then you have to give reasons for lateness.   That would be done like this
"I wish to request a late mandatory reconsideration of the decision dated xx/xx/2018 regarding PIP/ESA/etc.  My request is late as I was not in a fit state mentally or physically to deal with my affairs,  I was in hospital (or give the reason why you didn't ask for an MR earlier). You have failed to consider the following"

Lankou - there are concerns that the dwp will try to force people to use this form and try to say that unless its on this paperwork its not legal and the courts don't back that up, also the form can be intimidating to many people and its another false barrier introduced by DWP under the guise of trying to be helpful.  we were looking at it today and there is chatter on rightsnet about the format.
Its like every tool - useful to some and a barrier to others. 
 >dove<
Monic

lankou

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2018, 07:49:05 AM »
I was only disseminating information, at the very least the notes should be useful to most people who need them.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2018, 02:14:28 PM »
I just looked at it. 

One thing that bugs me (and I know this isn't about the form, but please let me rant).  They say you mustn't send appointment letters, but what they don't say is how else you prove that an old condition is still current.

What I mean by that is this - I sent a letter calling me in for a follow-up appointment to adjust my hearing aids as proof that I'm still being issued them, and still deemed to need them.  The DWP said they wanted an audiogram.  I pointed out to them that the law doesn't stipulate the level of hearing loss, it stipulates the need for hearing aids.  I was told I might just fancy them and I pointed out that qualified audiologists in NHS hospitals don't issue NHS hearing aids unless they consider them necessary.

However, in all seriousness, it gives rise to issues as to how you prove things.  Obviously, part of the hope is that if they insist on other evidence, you have to pay for a copy of it, that you can't afford that, and that therefore they can turn you down again.

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2018, 06:13:41 PM »
Your GP can write stating what your needs are and what help you need for each condition. I do agree that an appointment letter can be fairly meaningless in that many people attend clinics regularly for check ups but don't require any change or treatment. I had 3 operations on my eyes before the age of 18 months and was seen every 3 months until school age and then annually until I reached 18 but my last treatment was aged under 18 months. I hope I'm explaining that okay.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2018, 07:04:44 PM »
1. Unless asked directly by the DWP, providing information for benefits purposes falls outwith the GP contract, therefore GPs may, if they wish, either decline to do it or charge for it.  If they decline to provide information specifically for this, you can ask for a copy of your notes, but there are standard charges for this, and as I pointed out, not everyone can afford this.  In some parts of the country, the LMC has taken a stand and advised its members not to provide letters for benefits claims or appeals.  In such circumstances, the only other option may be to see a private consultant for an assessment and opinion.  Hence my point about whether people can afford to get other evidence.

2. Whilst an appointment letter may be meaningless, it may be very specific.   In the example I gave, an appointment letter to adjust hearing aids just issued shows specifically (a) that hearing aids have been recently issued, (b) who has issued those aids.  By contrast, the process of getting a copy of the hospital notes to show that aids have been issued and when can take a long time and cost quite a bit of money as you contact the hospital, they send you a form to fill in, you send it back, they send you a price, you write back to accept the price and enclose a cheque, and they send you the documentation.

I can think of many other instances in which it could be specific.  E.g. an appointment to fit prosthetic limbs, an appointment for a follow up to amputation, an appointment for admission to a palliative care nursing unit for end-of-life care, an appointment letter sent to someone else to take you to the advanced-dementia care unit, an appointment for a regular follow-up at the tetraplegic clinic etc.

(3) Even if an appointment letter is old, it may still be relevant in relation to irreversible conditions, e.g. letters for follow-up care to amputations would not be time-limited as to relevance where the amputation was relevant to eligibility.  E.g. if your eyeballs have been removed, they won't grow back, if you have Downs syndrome, your IQ won't magically rocket 30 years later.

So whilst I accept that appointment letters aren't always meaningful, they can be very meaningful, and for some people, it's all they've got.  Time was, you used to get a discharge letter after hospital appointments, but that doesn't always happen.  I happened to notice recently when my GP let me look at his computer screen (I have to get up close to do so), that there have been various accidents and injuries and conditions for which I have had hospital treatment which don't show on it.  I was quite bemused by it.  Not long after, I went to see him simply to tell him about some things so that they would show up on his computer record. 

Please at least have some understanding that for thousands of people, getting a letter from their GP stating what their needs are and what help they need is either not an option at all or one that's too expensive.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2018, 07:27:51 PM »
Yes sorry sunny, I apologise.

I know I'm blessed with having a GP who always goes over and above normal GP care. Her weekly phone calls to me when I'm in hospital are my only contact with the outside world. She's amazing.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2018, 08:42:27 PM »
I've got a good GP too, albeit one that's rushed off his feet.  Given all that you've been through, what a rough time you've had, I'm glad you've got a GP that goes that extra mile for you.  It can make such a difference, can't it?
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Monic1511

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2018, 10:21:01 PM »
Lankou

Apologies I was not meaning to be critical of you,  DWP yes but that's nothing new.
 >dove<
monic

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2018, 10:44:56 PM »
Quote
Apologies I was not meaning to be critical of you,  DWP yes but that's nothing new.
 >dove<

I reckon I should copy that and keep it to use myself.  It's the sort of comment I could do with making as a follow up to most of what I post on any thread where the DWP is mentioned.

I don't know what I'd do without the combination of those that give links to the official stuff and news stuff and those that say reassuring stuff.  This site's a valuable resource.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Important, online mandatory reconsideration form and notes.
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2018, 07:13:39 PM »
I wish it were possible to like comments.

I think I have facebookitis.