Author Topic: PIP "We've got the info to decide"  (Read 168 times)

Sunny Clouds

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PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« on: November 04, 2017, 10:55:31 AM »
I got a letter from the DWP saying they've got all the info they need to make a decision & don't contact them.

I had mixed feelings, because I'm assuming I'll need to appeal, so it's good that I don't have the decision  yet and so don't have to faff around with the appeal, but bad that they're close to deciding, because I'm as sure as I can be that I'll get less on PIP.  I'd thought I'd have to attend for an assessment and that that would drag the process out for longer. 

However, is anyone aware of a source of info on the typical wait between such letters and decisions or is it like the proverbial piece of string?

Inside me, I'm thinking please, please, DWP decision maker, put this at the bottom of the pile and tell me after Christmas, or at least mid-December so I can wait until New Year to bung in my request for a review. 

SashaQ

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2017, 12:52:35 PM »
Mine came through fairly quickly - I think it was only about two weeks after receiving that letter that I found I had been granted the PIP I was hoping for but expecting to not get.

I haven'tbeen able to find any gov.uk guidelines on timescales, but the consensus here http://www.youreable.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-8341.html is that it is 2-4 weeks.

I'm thinking of you and hope the outcome is what you are hoping for rather than what you're expecting  >hugs<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2017, 01:36:51 PM »
You never know your luck, but I don't feel hopeful.  I've probably said elsewhere, though I don't remember, that I saw my GP after my application had gone in, to bring him up to speed on my ataxia, and he appeared shocked at what I told him about how bad it was.  Yet he said the DWP had already contacted him.  So I can't see that they'd be satisfied my mobility problems were as bad as they are, given that he wouldn't have told them they were.

The thing is that I can walk ok.  It's the safely bit that's the problem. 

Oh well, if they say I can't have the mobility element, I doubt whether it'll make much difference, but I'll gather together various evidence and then I'll appeal.  Maybe I can find half a dozen or even a dozen witnesses to falls and injuries.  Even if I don't get it, it'll add to the mountain of appeals and maybe will help towards getting the  message across that the current system isn't cost-effective.  I can't remember how much I stand to lose, but let's say it's somewhere between £1000 & £1500/year.  Let's say I reapply in 3 years, so in the meantime I lose £4500.  It wouldn't actually take a lot to use up more state time and resources than that.  I know it's public money, but the more it adds up, the more pressure there is on the government to back down.

In theory, this is how it could add up...
More info, drip, drip drip, dozens upon dozens of pages...
Send it carefully bound requiring time to unbind it before scanning it...
Chase every bit of info with at least three phone calls...
Go to MP's surgery at least three times and make several phone calls...
Make repeated contact with DWP to chase up whether they've responded to MP...
Refer very carefully to legal cases so they have to refer it across/higher to be sure...
Send in stuff with lots of clinical jargon they need to look up...
Send in X-rays, photos and other non-standard size items...
Keep going into jobcentre to express anxiety and to send more copies of everything...
When it goes to appeal, keep sending in lots more info...
Make lots of phone calls and send lots of letters about things like access to the tribunal, including disability access, lipspeakers, specialist lighting for anything you need to look at...

Ok, so that's a lot of effort, but in all seriousness, you probably wouldn't need to do more than half that to cost the DWP at least £5000.

Sometimes I feel like just drawing down on my works pension, but that means less money later and why should I?




KizzyKazaer

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2017, 05:02:10 PM »
I've not heard of a letter like that before, on my PIP claim the 'we have enough info to decide without a face-to-face assessment' statement came on the actual final decision letter, not as a separate in its own right   >confused<

A thought:  If you don't get the mobility but you do get the 'daily living component', I would be very wary about appealing, by the way.  As per DLA, the DWP will then review the entire award and you might not want to chance that.... Anyway  >x-fingers< >x-fingers< and all that...

Sunny Clouds

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2017, 06:45:48 PM »
I'd forgotten that.

Horrible.

Mind you, I've got good witness evidence on stuff like communicating but I'm not sure about stuff like cooking.  It's not as if anyone watches me.

Monic1511

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2017, 08:35:59 PM »
Hi Sunny
PIP is different in that there is not a cooking test, its an accumulation of points.  the we have enough info letter is about a month before a decision is sent normally.

Monic

Fiz

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2017, 08:46:48 PM »
Sunny

I'm like you, I can physically walk ok.  But it causes intense pain which can last days and more recently incontinence.  However, I can walk ok so I'm not eligible for PIP mobility.

I'm very grateful that I don't fall because I'm unable to get up from the floor without being lifted so that would be awful. I have to hang on to my blessings and not falling is one of them.

I hope you get a fair and just result  >x-fingers<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2017, 08:52:47 PM »
1. Preparing food.
a. Can prepare and cook a simple meal  unaided.  0 points.

b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal.  2 points.

c. Cannot cook a simple meal using a conventional cooker but is able to do so using a microwave. 2 points

d. Needs prompting to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal.  2 points.

That's what I was referring to. 

Sunny Clouds

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2017, 08:58:48 PM »
The definition I've been going by as the definition for PIP is:-

A “simple meal”, for the purpose of personal independence payment (PIP), has a legal definition of a cooked, one course meal for one using fresh ingredients .

Monic1511

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2017, 10:19:59 PM »
What has not been challenged yet is which meals you make from fresh ingredients and cook in a microwave, if you’re happy with 2points for that one that’s fine but I know WRO who wonder about that question I put earlier.

 >dove<
Monic

Sunny Clouds

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Re: PIP "We've got the info to decide"
« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2017, 10:58:43 PM »
I don't argue that I can use a conventional cooker for anything.  I don't.  Thanks to my inattention, I have had full-thickness (3rd degree) burns from cooking on the hob.  I have blown up a microwave oven set to convection.   I have set fire to items in a conventional oven on a number of occasions.   I have resorted to cooking my eggs in a thermos flask (put egg in, add hot water, put lid on, leave to cook.)   I can show that my attentional memory is such that on bog-standard memory tests I get lower scores than people do with mid-stage dementia.