Author Topic: navigation  (Read 317 times)

bulekingfisher

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navigation
« on: June 29, 2017, 08:49:59 PM »
Hello all ouch readers

I was 13 when a road accident put me in a wheelchair 48 years ago + life feels like  I'm stuck in a cul-de-sac + facing a dead end as there are no prospects for a brighter future like having no trade's, skill's apretaship. Do other impaired people feel like this

auntieCtheM

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Re: navigation
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2017, 09:53:41 PM »
For me it was getting older that made me feel that way.  You are 60 ish now aren't you.  So you may feel that you are on the slippery slope with nothing new on the horizon.

huhn

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Re: navigation
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2017, 04:54:14 AM »
yes bule >crying< >crying< >crying< >crying< >crying< >crying< >crying< >crying< >crying< >crying<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: navigation
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2017, 12:35:09 PM »
Some days it seems like things will never get better and other days it seems like if only I can manage to find different ways in which I want life to be better, it can improve. 

I have been crying and crying over it recently, yet I have moments when I find there are different things that seem possible and positive.

Personal story - my  mother was a professional woman but when she married my father, who had fewer qualifications than her, she got pregnant and he launched his career.  So she could only have a part-time career, whilst supporting him in  his.  (He had the sort of career where a wife is important, to go with him to events and look elegant and supportive, and accept a bouquet of flowers or whatever.)

Then she reached menopause and the battles started.  He had already reached the pinnacle of his career, being still in his forties when he got a title.  Now it was her turn.  Her job remained part time, but as she drew closer to retirement, she got involved in more and more activities.  When she retired, she blossomed.  She found things that mattered to her.  When she died, I found so many things that she had done.  I sit here with a copy of my father's Who's Who entry.  She wasn't considered important enough to have one.  But she met more 'real' people who liked her for herself not who or what she represented, had more influence on ordinary people's lives in our local community, she had people who still wanted to see her  when she struggled to see, struggled to walk etc.

There can be loneliness for any of us, and I'm not a good person to be sounding encouraging myself because I am going through a patch where I find it difficult to see what future I might have.  Yet most of my real life friends are in their seventies, and most appear to have blossomed as they got older.

How that could apply to you, Bule, I don't know.  I am still trying to work out how it could apply to me.  I am very depressed at the moment, putting a face on with people I meet face to face to such an extent that they are surprised when I tell them, but crying and crying.  Yet logic tells me that people with all sorts of obstacles do find some sort of way forward.  Not everyone, but lots.

I don't know how to find a future or to find hope but there are those that seem to so it must be possible.

huhn

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Re: navigation
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2017, 07:02:41 PM »
`thanks, that gives me hope, looks like my life with 50 is on the lowest point. and in the moment I am starting with a new one , how its looks, and somehow , my husband  finds now I am  not more needed for his life so he makes it difficult for me and  now that I put my own life again together he tries to break it.  your post gives me hope and strength and when others have the same  issue ,  looks like that your mother had a similar live,  that means we are not alone.

Norrin Radd

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Re: navigation
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2017, 12:24:44 AM »
I feel the same, Blue  >hugs<

I was born with muscular dystrophy, and as I got older, I seemed to do everything more slowly than everyone else. Now I'm 30, but I feel more like 100.

I don't think I'll ever be able to work. I want to try, but I worry it might do me more harm than good.