Author Topic: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer  (Read 16904 times)

auntieCtheM

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #285 on: September 14, 2017, 10:21:47 PM »
What did the receptionists say when you pointed this out Sunny?

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #286 on: September 14, 2017, 10:59:29 PM »
That they didn't know about the hearing problem.

It all comes down to a lack of communication.

But I've yet to ask for any adjustment that cost anything other than a message passed on from person A to person B and someone gesticulating or walking an extra 4-5 metres to collect me.

I felt so incredibly lonely with no one with me.

I wasn't going to say about it on here, but if someone from the clinic's a lurker, then I'm not saying here anything I didn't say to their faces.

I'm not asking them to go out and buy lots of expensive kit (although I don't think it would be unreasonable if for the benefit of those that find them helpful they bought some stuff like portable loops etc.).

The good side of all this is that various local people in shops saw I was upset and were kind.

I stumbled when I tried to step out of the way of some teenagers were larking about with a bit of chasing and friendly shoving and they stopped and asked if I was ok and how could they  help.  I said I've got balance problems and it's ok, the thing that really matters is when people aren't horrible if I stumble or fall, and it's a good thing when youngsters are lively and enjoying a bit of larking about.  They're like the youngsters that accidentally knocked me down some stairs recently.  It was scary to fall but ok because they stopped and asked if I was ok and I could say I was ok but it made the difference between feeling ok and feeling very upset that they'd stopped to make sure I was ok and thank you. 

But I feel increasingly anything between hesitant and scared to go anywhere.  I wish I knew how to overcome this psychological hurdle.  I keep trying but it takes more and more of an effort.

And to go back to the topic of the thread, the whole process of PIP has made me feel so much worse.  It was utterly humiliating doing the paperwork and the government knows it.  It's one of the many ways they try to stop us claiming.  And if a few of us depressives decide it's all too much?  More money saved.  If a few people with physical impairments can't do the basics and die of infections or hunger or whatever?  More money saved.

Surely that has to be a reason to keep going and, if I don't get PIP, to appeal etc.  To fight back, to take a stand.


SunshineMeadows

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #287 on: September 15, 2017, 09:51:00 AM »
 >bighugs< >bighugs< >bighugs< >chocolate< >chocolate< >chocolate<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #288 on: September 15, 2017, 12:57:15 PM »
Thank you.

I'm musing about how much this is helping and I think I'll post something more general elsethread.

huhn

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #289 on: September 15, 2017, 05:12:28 PM »
we have here in Cyprus not DLA and no PIP but my big girl has a change in her payments for here illness or handicap and off course , it did not get smoothly, she got last month no money, now I have to wait is she getting this month her money or we have again  to fight again  for her rights. everywhere the  same problems how it looks. and  please do not laugh, the change took 3 years, even a snail is faster. >whistle< >whistle< >whistle< >whistle< >whistle< >whistle< >whistle<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #290 on: September 15, 2017, 05:55:27 PM »
 >bighugs< >bighugs<

auntieCtheM

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #291 on: September 15, 2017, 07:47:57 PM »
Sunny, if it helps, every time you fall down think of it as extra proof that you need the money to pay someone to be with you when you go out.  Something else to tell the DWP at your hearing.  Maybe make a list of falls that you can take with you.

ally

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #292 on: September 15, 2017, 08:10:36 PM »
Sunny when I posted about the POA being imposed on me against my will, it wasn't my intention to worry anyone  What you've posted below about your experience at a clinic, is something that's normal for someone deaf.  I've had it all my life.  Paying to go private won't solve the problem.  You need to educate those who don't understand deafness. Don't allow anyone to treat,  or, make you feel inferior.  If you've told the receptionists  you're deaf, and need someone to come over to get you, if they dont.   Make sure they know how you feel about it.  You deserve a lot more.

I often feel the odd one out on this forum.  I'm married with a husband who's always there for me, and,  I don't have MH problems.  However, I feel I've learnt a lot on here, and, I know how many struggle with loneliness, and, additional needs.  Without sounding condescending, I feel very sorry for many on here.  If I'm struggling with the forms,  feeling down, and they're making me focus inwards  on my disabilities..  God knows what it's doing to those on here.  So hugs to you sunny, Huhn, and everyone else.  Stay strong  >bighugs<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: The dreaded DLA to PIP transfer
« Reply #293 on: September 15, 2017, 09:39:57 PM »
Incidentally, in relation to the 'all my life' stuff...

My current hearing problems may be primarily relating to poor sound discrimination and poor hearing aids, but for years I've had less than ideal hearing, being of the generation of soldiers that didn't have ear-defenders.   (Now you know why sergeant majors shout!)  I also had some sensineural loss from severe ear infections at the age of about 5.

However, as a child I had what is now called glue ear, and for some years was profoundly deaf in one ear and severely deaf in the other.   I know what it is to go through the school day hearing very little at all of what the teachers said, sometimes nothing at all, for year after year.

Ironically, whilst my school was hopeless at dealing with it, I think that hospitals were generally better at dealing with patients with impairments round where I live when I was young.