Author Topic: ESA decision  (Read 1159 times)

seegee

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Re: ESA decision
« Reply #15 on: August 11, 2017, 10:36:44 PM »
 Wouldn't be much of a friend if I didn't help when I can, SM - and he wasn't (isn't) fit to be left struggling without help. >confusedgif< It was stressful mainly because of his extreme anxiety. >bigheadache<
 
I don't think about my ESA thing often, as they could be years behind or have just decided to leave certain people until they've caught up (oh, brain injury? don't bother... for example >whistle<).  Time for that when the letter arrives...


neurochick

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Re: ESA decision
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2017, 01:05:40 AM »
I think the trick with ESA (and PIP) is to make sure to keep a photocopy of your completed forms before you submit them so that you can simply just copy over as much of the information at the next re-assessment as possible.  Obviously you have to take into account changes in the questions, in the descriptors and their interpretation and any changes in your health/situation.  However, you don't want to start from scratch every time or to re-draft your answers every single time as that is incredibly difficult and time-consuming and makes the whole thing more stressful.   

The other essential thing to make life easier is rather than handwriting any of your answers, is to type up all of them on a computer or tablet into an electronic document which you can save and then next time just amend or update the document and then print off the updated version as necessary.  In each of the answer boxes on the form you can just make a reference to the single document which has all of your answers in it.  Again, it cuts down the work enormously and makes it massively easier to do each re-assessment.  That in itself cuts out a lot of the stress.  Always put your full name, date of birth and National Insurance Number on every page of the document and make sure you have page numbers.  Its easiest to type all of these up in the footer of the document so they automatically appear and print out on every page. 

Unless there have been significant changes in the descriptors or the way they are interpreted in between assessments, it very much reduces the risk of the DWP coming up with a different result when you are submitting essentially exactly the same wording and have expressed yourself in almost exactly the same way each time.  Being very consistent in the way you describe and express everything in each of your ESA forms is really helpful - if you describe things very differently from one form to another then it is more likely that they will interpret your answers differently.  I always also refer them back to the information contained in my previous ESA forms and just list the dates of each form so that they form an integral part of my application and so that they have to look at those too!  It again, makes it much harder for them to come up with a different result.             

SunshineMeadows

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Re: ESA decision
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2017, 09:04:45 AM »
Seegee,

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I don't think about my ESA thing often, as they could be years behind or have just decided to leave certain people until they've caught up (oh, brain injury? don't bother... for example >whistle<).  Time for that when the letter arrives...

 >thumbsup< I agree. On my first ESA form I put Cerebral Palsy then on the next one I put Spastic Diplegia because it says that on my medical records, The first time I was put in WRAG and the second the Support Group.


Neurochick,

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I always also refer them back to the information contained in my previous ESA forms and just list the dates of each form so that they form an integral part of my application and so that they have to look at those too

 >thumbsup<

I do a variation on this in that I read what I put in my previous claim and then put that to one side and go through the form seeing write out my answers and then look back at the older answers. For me this meant I was able to make sure I added information about how symptoms and disability are worse. As people may have already noticed I do have problems typing out what I want to say. The words come more easily when I am using a pen and paper but that is just me. I do scan the handwritten answers I put on the form and create a pdf to save to my computer.