Author Topic: ESA  (Read 608 times)

bub1

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ESA
« on: January 26, 2018, 08:19:37 PM »
Not sure what to put in title
If after my assessment yesterday they stop esa where do I stand with regards to dental treatment I went to dentist on Tuesday and had check up but she said I need a deep clean which is booked in for 6 Feb I may have heard result by then if esa is stopped will I have to pay for the treatment on the 6th February
Thanks

Monic1511

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Re: ESA
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2018, 09:10:53 PM »
IF you are found fit for work you would have to claim Jobseekers allowance for a short period while a reconsideration was done.  While on JSA you would still qualify for help with dental costs as I suspect you'll be on income related benefits.  >x-fingers< >hugs< >hugs<

bub1

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Re: ESA
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2018, 09:27:15 PM »
So even though it was put down on form that I need this treatment it wonít be covered?

Fiz

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Re: ESA
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2018, 09:11:09 AM »
Monic was saying you would still receive free dental care based on the fact that you would then be claiming income related JSA

bub1

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Re: ESA
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2018, 10:10:04 AM »
Will have to rethink that one then as if I fail I wonít be claiming JSA as I canít work. So it would not be right to claim it.
Thankyou for making that clear for me.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: ESA
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2018, 10:30:50 AM »
Just a thought.  Something that occurred to  me about the way NHS dental treatment is charged.  What I'm about to say relates to England and I don't know which bit of the UK you're in, but if not England you could still check to see if it's the same.

It's to do with the fact that if you pay NHS dental charges, you're charged for a 'course of treatment' or for 'courses of treatment' not for 'a treatment' or 'treatments'.

If you have a check-up with a dentist on the NHS and they say you need cleaning, that is normally regarded as part of the same 'course of treatment'.  The different sorts of courses of treatment have different prices.  This is the one that seems to be relevant.

Quote from NHS website

Quote
Band 1 course of treatment Ė £20.60

This covers examinations, diagnosis (including radiographs), advice on how to prevent future problems, scale and polish if clinically necessary, and preventative care (for example, applications of fluoride varnish or fissure sealant).

So maybe check whether eligibility for free treatment depends on whether it's when the 'course of treatment' started or whether it depends on when it finished.  It may be that the fact the 'course of treatment' started whilst you were eligible, it would continue to be free until finished.  Or it might even be that a nice dentist would consider it the decent thing to finish off the treatment even if you're not eligible for free.  My own dentist cross-subsidises heavily between private and NHS care.  I know because I've taken other members of my family with different needs and different entitlements to see him. 

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

bub1

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Re: ESA
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2018, 12:23:16 PM »
Will do thanks

Sunny Clouds

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Re: ESA
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2018, 02:26:25 PM »
Not that it matters, of course.  After all, you're disabled, so if it doesn't matter whether you've money for food or housing or care or equipment, then it doesn't matter if your teeth fall out.  Besides, if you don't get your ESA, you won't have any food to chew, so you won't need teeth.

 >devil<
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

KizzyKazaer

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Re: ESA
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2018, 05:14:09 PM »
 >lol< naughty Sunny  >lol<

PS - I don't like the sound of a 'deep clean'  >yikes< > shudder <

bub1

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Re: ESA
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2018, 08:06:50 PM »
Itís not nice. But now I know about it Thankyou all.

Monic1511

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Re: ESA
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2018, 08:11:47 PM »
Bub

you can claim JSA if found fit for work - even though you know you are NOT fit for work - all that happens is you phone JSA and when the person says "are you fit available and actively seeking work" your reply is "according to the dwp I'm fit for work"  you then attend your first appointment and the assessor checks you're a real person and tells you to go away and create a CV & start thinking about what jobs you might apply for.  You turn up 2 weeks later with a sick line in hand and you can do that for 13 weeks, by which time hopefully a decision has been made about your ESA.

If you don't claim JSA its harder to justify the dental treatment as you NEED to be in receipt of an income related benefit to get the help.

Fiz

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Re: ESA
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2018, 05:20:36 AM »
Totally different question but it's an ESA one so I thought I'd borrow this thread. When I last applied for ESA I was awarded nothing so I went to Tribunal who put me in the support group. That was 2011. Is it normal not to be reassessed in all this time since? The result would be no different I'm sure and the DWP would have been aware of my PIP assessment in 2016 in the meantime. I really hope an ESA assessment doesn't come up and bite me soon. Me being awarded nothing when assessed hasnt given me trust in the system.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: ESA
« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2018, 10:51:52 AM »
I was assessed in 2012 (first time, migration from IB) and then again in 2014.  I wonder whether for those of us in the support group, there's an assessment then another to be sure support group is right, then stick us on the back-burner unless something turns up that the relevant bit of the DWP considers may amount to a change of circumstances?

Maybe others will come along and say what their assessment spacings have been.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: ESA
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2018, 10:57:49 AM »
That would be useful. I think I'd be reassured if others had long gaps though I think it's linked in with PIP awards, if you get a high award they probably think you're not worth assessing.

bub1

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Re: ESA
« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2018, 08:15:59 PM »
My assessments have been 2 years apart. I had one this year and expect another in July 2019.