Author Topic: Obesity facts  (Read 6853 times)

AccessOfficer

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Obesity facts
« on: May 01, 2012, 10:26:57 AM »
http://www.dh.gov.uk/health/2012/04/obesityfacts/

Obesity is a clinical term used to describe excess body fat associated with increased risks to health. Being obese can increase the risk of diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and heart disease. Not only does obesity affect peopleís health, their lives and the lives of their families, but it places a large financial burden on the NHS and the wider economy.
In England in 2010:
   62.8% of adults (aged 16 or over) were overweight or obese
   30.3% of children (aged 2-15) were overweight or obese
   26.1% of all adults and 16% of all children were obese
Measuring obesity
The most common method of measuring obesity is calculating an individualís Body Mass Index (BMI). This is calculated by dividing a personís weight measurement (in kilograms) by the square of their height (in meters).
In adults, a BMI of 25 to 29.9 means that person is considered to be overweight, and a BMI of 30 or above means that person is considered to be obese.
In children and adolescents, BMI varies with age and sex, so the BMI score for children and adolescents is related to the UK 1990 BMI growth reference charts in order to determine a childís weight status.
BMI is the best way we have to measure the prevalence of obesity at the population level. No specialised equipment is needed and therefore it is easy to measure accurately and consistently across large populations. BMI is also widely used around the world, which enables comparisons between countries, regions and population sub-groups.
For most people, their BMI correlates well with their level of body fat. However, certain factors such as fitness and ethnic origin can sometimes alter the relationship between BMI and body fatness. So then other measurements such as waist circumference and skin fold thickness can also be collected to confirm an individual personís weight status.
Best wishes
AO
« Last Edit: May 01, 2012, 12:08:12 PM by AccessOfficer »

SteveX

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Re: Obesety facts
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2012, 12:06:43 PM »
BMI is a joke and needs to be replaced with something that works, it does not, according to the BMI, most athletes are obese.  lol

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RoseRodent

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2012, 12:52:38 PM »
Wonder what the OP had in mind by posting this. Usually if one posts a link it is accompanied by some kind of discussion point.

BMI is nonsense in itself and I was going to post a link to a fabulous slideshow project showing photographs of people alongside their BMI status, but the website that hosted it has shut down - no fair! I have tried many times to recreate it but have never had any takers - if any Ouchers and/or their friends would be prepared to contribute a photo please do get in touch and I'll make it again, it was genius. You can have your face blurred out or cut off if you want (I'll blur it for you if you don't have the technology or spoons, just ask me to do so). All I need is a photo saying your first name (can be a pseudonym) and whether your BMI considers you to be underweight, normal, overweight or obese.

So yeah, even if we ignore how nonsense BMI actually is, we must next ignore the fact that a good part of the supposedly massive increase in obesity is attributable to the movement of the goalposts - there used to be more categories of overweight, discreetly called "fat" and "very fat" then "obese" came afterwards. They were not based on BMI, but using chart data the "very fat" category roughly equated to BMIs from 28 to 32 or 33. If you change the definition of obese downwards then you will find more obese people.

And finally we must ask ourselves where do the data come from? If obesity is linked to health risks then we might easily conclude that more users of healthcare services are obese, thus a greater proportion of the obese population will attend places where statistics will be gathered than those of normal weight. My normal weight child and normal weight husband have not been weighed because they have had little to no contact with services which might weigh them and record that as a national statistic. We were asked if we would be prepared to have our daughter weighed at school to be part of a statistic and we refused - since there is a facility to refuse we must assume that the statistics self-exclude many people. This may be those of normal weight and may also include those who are knowingly obese and do not wish to have that pointed out to them. They do not come around to your house and weigh everyone as part of a national weight census, therefore we must look sceptically upon the figures.

And with these rigid policy divisions between "normal" and "over" weight we must ask ourselves exactly how overweight are these people? They could be 1lb from being obese or 1lb from being normal weight. I was once weighed in with a BMI of 25.1 and told of my impending doom, never mind that the extra 1lb could be a glass of water, a thick jumper or a bowel movement.

They need to be doing something more practical than telling fat people who know they are fat that they are fat and erroneously picking out fit people as being overweight. Why do these people eat more? How do we help them not do so? The weight loss help available at my surgery is that the nurse can give you a leaflet and you can be weighed once a month "If you like" - there is no help, just a leaflet on skimmed milk and come back to see if you are thinner yet.

And never mind the many tonnes of evidence that it is not obesity which causes type 2 diabetes per se, it is far more likely that susceptibility to type 2 diabetes is the cause of obesity, it is the driving force which causes people to eat more and suffer unsatisfied hunger. It's possible to prevent the one leading to the other only by failing to act on the hunger pains, weakness, faintness, nausea, etc. It is only through lack of plentiful food in the past that has stopped T2 diabetics becoming obese and displaying the late stage symptoms in their blood sugar. But if we look at it as a clinical condition which causes overeating we have to invest in cures rather than say "Hey, fattie, stop eating", which is pretty much what is on offer just now.

Sofie

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2012, 01:17:25 PM »
According to BMi, I'm the right weight for my height. If I'm a few kilos over that, I'm overweight. Oddily, I look better health-wise if I'm "slightly overweight". I'm not alone in that either.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2012, 04:23:41 PM »
Forget weight & BMI.  Stand in front of a mirror with nothing on except bra/Y-fronts (as appropriate) and jump up and down.  If anything wobbles, you either need new bra/Y-fronts or you need to get fitter (depending on what wobbles).

Second test - sit upright, lean forward, lie on your back, lie on your side...do bits of your fat make it uncomfortable (as opposed to, say, joint problems causing discomfort/pain)?  If so, get rid of them.

On the other hand, it's do like I say not do like I do because I'm currently overweight.  I know why.  I eat too much and exercise too little.

At least four things make me eat too much - I take medication that leads to weight gain, I go for short-term sugar highs and chocolate soothing rather than long-term health, I'm lonely and alternating between stressed and bored, I keep erratic hours and this leads to too many meals.

I can't do anything about the medication (well, I could stop taking it but that would be very stupid from a mental health perspective), but I can do something about the other stuff.  It's easier said than done, though, isn't it?

I've sort of stabilised my weight gain for now and mostly that's by increasing the fruit and protein in my diet and trying to fill up with water/low calorie drinks rather than food.

I read somewhere that once you've been fat, it's very difficult to lose weight  because your body makes extra fat cells that it wants to fill.  I think that means I shouldn't expect it to be easy but should work at it.

Oh dear.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

lankou

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2012, 05:27:32 PM »

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2012, 07:12:04 PM »
Lankou, I am wondering what point are you making by posting that photo?  It would be nice to have some accompanying text here ...

Interesting post, Rose!  I do sometimes wonder, now the 'health police' have done just about everything short of banning smoking, they need a new target - hence more and more spouting forth about 'obesity'.  After all, if more people can be blamed for causing their own ill-health due to 'lifestyle choices', the Government might be able to sneak in further VAT rises on confectionery etc, or even introduce the concept of 'self-inflicted' into the qualifying conditions for sickness/disability benefits - ie, if you are deemed to have 'brought it on yourself' you must, say, do a course of CBT to help you lose weight or kick smoking or whatever as a condition for receiving full-rate ESA ...  There could be the makings of a very slippery slope here.

lankou

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2012, 07:29:18 PM »
Lankou, I am wondering what point are you making by posting that photo?  It would be nice to have some accompanying text here ...


Obviously an attempt at humour fell on stony ground.

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2012, 07:35:27 PM »
Hardly - maybe someone did find it amusing, who's to say?  I just thought it seemed out of place in a serious discussion, but then that's just my opinion...Anyway, thank you for clarifying  :-)

SteveX

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2012, 08:22:00 PM »
Quote
Obviously an attempt at humour fell on stony ground.

Sorry, I don't find images of a large person amusing at all, in fact I only find it depressing that people who need support and help only get ridicule and used as 'amusement' for others.

Perhaps I'm too harsh, but a neighbour of mine is very large and she gets insults whenever she goes out but you couldn't meet a more friendly or helpful person.   It deeply upsets me that people hate others so easily and get some sicko laugh from such easy targets as the disabled and people with other health problems.

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sherbs

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2012, 08:48:04 PM »
Just seeing the other side of the attached photo.

The lady on the bike looks very happy to show off her ample backside, so I don't really see any problem with the photo, she is not particularly that large, and seems to be enjoying perching on the bike and being photographed, she may actually be a plus sized model as she is very attractive.

Sorry just my thoughts, and of course i agree fully that we should not ridicule  larger people,  but hey, maybe next time lankou just post a few words with your photograph    >biggrin<

boccius

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2012, 08:56:12 PM »
People looking happy doing things shouldn't be taken at face value. The woman on the bike might be trying to raise money for all sorts of reasons - could be for drugs, could be for medicine (particularly if she's from the Land of the Free, where nothing actually IS).

Friend of mine in LA is currently having to find £3000 a month (that's three thousand pounds) for a cancer drug, to treat her bowel cancer. Charities pay 80% of the money, leaving her £600 short. Unfortunately, she's now in her 70s, so baring her bum on a bike probably wouldn't help her finances.

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booboo

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2012, 08:57:43 PM »
Most of my life I have been overweight.  Due to spine ops I decided to try and lose some weight to reduce the pain etc.

I joined weight watchers and am now my ideal weight for my height.  Or so I thought, on reading the above about bmi I thought I would google it and see how I was doing.  Apparantely I am obese.  So weight watchers - am fine, bmi I arent.

To be honest, I arent bothered and for the first time in years I actually feel relatively happy and healthy.  Am going to hospital next week due to poorly knee but if they op it may make more unstable so will listen to what they suggest and go with that.

auntieCtheM

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2012, 12:19:41 AM »
I feel and look overweight, but my GP says I am not.

I know that I have gone up a couple of dress sizes, and can feel the extra fat walking around with me.  I suppose if the GP has statistics that say his patients are not overweight he gets a bonus?  Or maybe he saves money because he then ha no reason to do anything about it.

suspicious, that is what I am.

Otter

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Re: Obesity facts
« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2012, 01:25:49 AM »
the Otter is cuddly

to the OP people learn through experience not information, which is why with all  the zealous religious control of food advice people are still overweight

being overweight is as much a mental health issue as its a physical one, its a form of self harm and the moral snobery ivory towerisms don't help they only compact the issue

the info given is thorough, but probably not what many of us want to read, we know the issue, we eat more calories than we burn, however enabling us to manover from feeling in control through food to being in control of food is a different ball game and no amount of tutting is going to change that