Author Topic: Death by Doctor? GP Rant.  (Read 764 times)

Dark_Divinity

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Death by Doctor? GP Rant.
« on: November 01, 2016, 02:38:04 PM »
I am not okay and the problem is not a psychosomatic one. Having burning pain, cramping and scratching sensation inside your digestive system is not a mental health issue. Having olive green pooh that is an orangy red colour when you open it up is bad and so is pulling bloody mucus out of my own pooh.

I am not malingering to get attention or for personal gain in order to stay on benefits because I think that going out to work, earning money and being safer and more independent is beneath me. I guess itís just easier for people to think of me as a scrounger who is playing the system, stealing the tax money paid by hard-working decent people.

Living the life of riley on benefits at the mercy of some Government employed pen pusher and emotionless, arrogant medical professionals who enjoys patronising and demonising me to my face knowing that there is not a damn thing I can do about it. They are the ones with the power to crush the life out of me with a few minutes of typing and clicking on their computers as they pretend to listen to me.

Yes, I do have some mental health issues but that shouldnít be used against me to play games and send me round in circles. Having mental health issues doesnít protect you from having physical health issues. Fighting to be listened to by people who treat you like a pest and a liar can make someone depressed and anxious.

They say that they are trying to help me, I donít think that is their real intention. I am being set-up to fall on the sword that they are all creating for me in order to reach the stage where they can completely block me from accessing help from the NHS.


« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 08:48:18 PM by Dark_Divinity »
June 2012 -Hypothyroidism.

Mentally Wobbly.

Dark_Divinity

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Death by Doctor? GP Rant.
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2016, 02:39:01 PM »
I am not sure that this therapy is going to help me, it could be a ploy to gather evidence to use against me to prove that I am malingering and wasting NHS time, money and resources. The reason why the word psychosomatic is used is because there isnít enough evidence yet for them to confidently and openly say that I am malingering. Once this therapy process is over the end result will be either inconclusive or a statement declaring that I do not meet the symptom criteria for the diagnosis.

I feel that for some reason a number of people in the medical profession have taken a dislike to me and have used my medical files as a weapon against me so that new medical professionals who donít know me get influenced to take the same attitude when dealing with me.

Having GP after GP tell me what psychosomatic means in a patronising manner as if I am a stupid 5 year old girl who has nothing better to do in life that be a time-wasting pain in the arse to busy, time-restricted Gps in an over-stretching and under-funded Health System.

I think that I have finally connected all the dots and now realise that they cannot be trusted to help me.

This is just a way to discredit me and push me into becoming crazy, a self-fulfilling prophecy when they play mind-games with me, block me, fob me off and leave me to suffer until I become so demoralised and desperate that I admit that they are right when they are not just to get some sort of treatment even if it is not the right treatment that I need.

This feels personal to me like someone feels upset with me for some reason and is getting revenge on my by turning everyone against me. Maybe itís a medical professional from my past that has sow the seeds in my medical files who likes to play God with peoples lives and pull legs off spiders as it makes them feel all warm and fuzzy inside to torture someone who canít fight back.

I am not sure that doing this therapy is going to help me, maybe it would be best
« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 08:41:46 PM by Dark_Divinity »
June 2012 -Hypothyroidism.

Mentally Wobbly.

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: Death by Doctor? GP Rant.
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2016, 03:19:49 PM »
 >bighugs< >bighugs< >bighugs<


I very low on physical and mental spoons right now, so if I've missed something in your posts above please forgive me.  Are you taking any vitamin or mineral supplements at the moment? I ask only because my IBS can get very angry indeed if I'm taking supplements with a high iron content, and some of the bum-related side effects are colourful to say the least.


Please keep posting. We may not be able to supply the answers you need right now, but we can listen and try out best to support you >hugs<

« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 03:59:42 PM by NeuralgicNeurotic »

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Death by Doctor? GP Rant.
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2016, 05:15:03 PM »
Quote
Yes, I do have some mental health issues but that shouldnít be used against me to play games and send me round in circles. Having mental health issues doesnít protect you from having physical health issues.

DD, I absolutely agree with you on both counts!  Obviously I don't know your 'medical people' enough to judge whether or not their actions/inactions are malicious in some way, but the fact that you feel that way must be totally vile for you.  I was wondering, is there anyone who could go with you on your next GP visit, like a close friend or even an advocate?  GPs tend to be more attentive and focused when there's a second person in the room ...

Your digestive problem sounds real enough to me, by the way, and very unpleasant to live with.  And even if the origin was 'psychosomatic', that doesn't make it any less painful or less physical, and it does not automatically equate to 'non-treatable'!!

'Psychosomatic' should never be a substitute word for 'faking it', because that is not the case at all.  Unfortunately there are still some medical professionals who do think that way  >doh<

Also curious to know what therapy you are having at the moment?


>edited to add
« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 05:16:54 PM by KizzyKazaer »

Dark_Divinity

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Death by Doctor? GP Rant.
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2016, 07:35:57 PM »
I am taking Feroglobin slow release capsules that contain gentle Iron, folic acid and vitamin B12. I am taking a Multi-Vitamin every few days. Trying to drink more water, small amounts as often as possible. Trying to eat small meals and snack on a regular basis when I don't feel nauseous. Sleeping and resting more. Going out only when I really need to. Still feel strange and light-headed when I stand up too fast or for too long. Pounding head when standing. Burning joint pain and burning clawing pain in abdomen when trying to sleep at night. I probably feel tired and light-headed due to low blood pressure and low iron levels.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 08:46:54 PM by Dark_Divinity »
June 2012 -Hypothyroidism.

Mentally Wobbly.

Dark_Divinity

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Death by Doctor? GP Rant.
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2016, 07:42:10 PM »
My therapy is for a Dissociative Disorder that they believe that I have. Trying to convince me that I have. At the moment I am in the assessment stage before the therapy is going to take place.
June 2012 -Hypothyroidism.

Mentally Wobbly.

auntieCtheM

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Re: Death by Doctor? GP Rant.
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2016, 09:26:16 PM »
 >hugs< >hugs<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Death by Doctor? GP Rant.
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2016, 11:15:49 AM »
DD - one of my long replies, skip if you're not in the mood.  As usual, I'm exploring ideas, so you may disagree, but if you do, I'm not offended.

I'm not quite clear whether your distressed posts arise from a GP referring you from therapy or from having been referred and meeting the therapist.

I think that whether you've met the therapist or not, it's worth checking them out.  Do you know anyone locally who might have had therapy with them or who knows someone who might have and so on? 

Have you met the therapist?  If so, I value gut feelings a lot in this, indeed much more so than before I had therapy.  After all, why wouldn't therapists be all range of competencies just like any other professionals?

But please don't write off the idea of some therapy without checking it all out - for all you know, a therapist might be a lot more understanding than a GP.

The other thing is that the whole psychosomatic thing is difficult, and it doesn't help that you're very politically aware in relation to disability and welfare, so you know all the rubbish about Unum, malingering etc.  But not all doctors and therapists see it quite like that.

Here's my take on pyschosomatic and you may disagree but I'll say it anyway.  Ok, so sometimes we either have physical conditions that arise from our mental state or we think we do.  But that doesn't make them imaginary.  If they're real physical conditions, the fact that they arise from our mental state doesn't take away from the fact that they're real physical conditions.  The funny thing is that if for example it's a pounding heart or sweaty hands, no one finds it odd to think of anxiety or panic causing genuine physical conditions.   They're not seen as not real.  However, what it does do is to make it make sense to tackle the cause, which is our mental state, as well as the symptoms. 

If they're not real physical conditions, they're still real insofar as we think we have them and a brain that can produce the illusion of physical conditions is one that's distressed and needs help, so again, the perception of physical symptoms is real, but it's the mental cause that needs tackling.  To be even more confusing, all those that said that voices are real even if they're not the people the hearer thinks they are were seen as dotty until someone discovered on fmri brain scanning that the same area of your brain lights up when you hear 'voices' as when you hear a real voice.  So the 'voice' is imaginary in one sense, but nevertheless something real is happening physically.  It's a real physical experience as well as an imaginary one.  (I sometimes think things like this are very Schroedinger's cat-like.)

Personally, I shouldn't be in the least bit surprised if your physical conditions were a mixture of real not caused by your mental state, real caused by your mental state, and not real but genuinely perceived and caused by your mental state.

I came across something written by a doctor about how doctors ought to listen to what patients tell them.  He said how for years patients had been telling their doctors that they take paracetamol to help them sleep.  Researchers looked into it and consistently concluded that paracetamol isn't effective as a sleeping tablet.  So it was generally concluded that it worked on a placebo basis.

Then it occurred to someone to check out a different angle - pain.  Well, of course paracetamol works for pain, that's what it's sold for, but what's that got to do with it?  A lot if you're an elderly (or not so elderly) person who's in pain, but just takes it for granted that they'll be in pain at their age, and who therefore doesn't make the connection between damping down their pain and getting to sleep.

Therefore when elderly Mrs Creaky comes in and says she takes paracetamol to help her sleep, it means that her pain is so severe that it's keeping her awake so it's probably worse than she says it or thinks it is, or probably distressing her more than she says it is or than she thinks it is.

But not all doctors think that way when patients come in and say things.

Therefore my gut feeling here would be to go for a sort of verbal compromise, and agree that your mental state may be affecting your body, just as the very real physical symptoms you've got are affecting your mental state, so it makes sense to tackle both.

After all, it's scarcely a new thing to know that in a very real sense, people's mental state can affect things like gut motility and digestion.  Let's put it at it's simplest -  it's very common not just in humans but in the animal world to get an attack of diarrhoea when suddenly frightened.  The explanation I always accepted (though maybe there are others) is that it makes perfect sense when getting ready to fight or flee to empty one's digestive system.  Personally, I'm the opposite way round because I have a horror of being interrupted.  Not a horror of being seen, just of not being able to finish going time-wise.

I bet most doctors have had the experience of retching at things they've seen, particularly when still in training, so they've no excuse for not recognising that just because there's a mental dimension doesn't mean the physical condition isn't real.

So I'd say meet your GP half way.   Prepare a careful case/argument.  Yes, some sort of therapy may help but you still need help with physical problems.

Incidentally, you don't have to be bonkers to end up obsessed with your stools.  Most people may not open them up, but if you have concerns then the idea that you examine them makes sense so long as it doesn't become obsessive in nature, which then becomes distressing.  But look at animals - they turn round, look and sniff.  If I had my own house, I'd love to have a German-style loo installed with an inspection shelf, and the mere fact that such loos exist and that there are millions of people in Europe that have them tells you that inspecting your stools isn't unique to you.  But some people may see it as bonkers.

Anyway, that's my few ha'porth.

 >hugs<