Author Topic: Vitamin B12.  (Read 2172 times)

Rosie

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2017, 05:46:23 PM »
Normally the only people who need regular B12 injections are vegetarians and vegans - those who do not eat meat.



B12 injections are prescription only no GP is going to issue a B12 prescription just because someone is a vegetarian or vegan.

Of course not, and a vegetarian and vegan need regular blood tests.  The GP will then issue a prescription for a B12 injection which is given by the surgery nurse, usually once a month.  Not by the patient themselves.

Sublingual B12 tablets have a much lower amount and do not need a prescription - or a blood test for that matter, as they are classed as an OTC vitamin.
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lankou

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2017, 07:20:48 PM »
The GP will then issue a prescription for a B12 injection which is given by the surgery nurse, usually once a month. 

B12 injections are every three months.

Fiz

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2017, 08:01:37 PM »
Depends on the levels and the reason. A friend has them weekly for three weeks in a row then a blood test 2 months later to see if she needs more. So far she's been having injections weekly for three weeks every three months. She had gastric reduction surgery so doesn't absorb sufficient essential nutrients from her diet.

Rosie

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2017, 08:20:43 PM »

B12 injections are every three months.

Thanks for the correction!  >hugs<
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lankou

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2017, 07:12:27 AM »
Depends on the levels and the reason. A friend has them weekly for three weeks in a row then a blood test 2 months later to see if she needs more. So far she's been having injections weekly for three weeks every three months. She had gastric reduction surgery so doesn't absorb sufficient essential nutrients from her diet.

That is somewhat of an exception.

Jockice

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2017, 07:55:28 AM »
Depends on the levels and the reason. A friend has them weekly for three weeks in a row then a blood test 2 months later to see if she needs more. So far she's been having injections weekly for three weeks every three months. She had gastric reduction surgery so doesn't absorb sufficient essential nutrients from her diet.

That is somewhat of an exception.

So what's with the daily injections my sis...er...this person I know insists are so essential?

lankou

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2017, 08:31:04 AM »


So what's with the daily injections my sis...er...this person I know insists are so essential?

Daily injections of B12? There at very few conditions that warrant that and then only for seven days, with a tailing off to one injection per month.
The vast majority of people with B12 deficiency (it is "familial")  is one injection every three months.

Jockice

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2017, 08:48:36 AM »


So what's with the daily injections my sis...er...this person I know insists are so essential?

Daily injections of B12? There at very few conditions that warrant that and then only for seven days, with a tailing off to one injection per month.
The vast majority of people with B12 deficiency (it is "familial")  is one injection every three months.

Indeed. I think there's something very strange going on here.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2017, 04:12:51 PM »
I have an alternative solution to propose: lie.

Tell your annoying relative that you've discussed it with your neurologist and he's sure it isn't that and has done blood tests but you'll be having a couple of injections anyway before the next blood test to do a comparison in B12 levels and [insert something] levels and functioning of your [insert bit of you that doesn't function well].

Time was, I'd never have suggested that, but there does come a point.

As to why people have different patterns of injections, wouldn't it depend on why they needed them?  I mean, if it's for maintenance or something, maybe not very often, but if there are symptoms of severe deficiency plus an absorption problem, then maybe oodles of it to get that sorted, then less frequently?  After all, that's the sort of thing that gets done with various other deficiencies.

And to take a random example, I take vit A for my night-blindness.  Ordinarily if you had a problem that way, you might need a fair bit extra for a while, then just make sure you've got an everyday amount.  In my case, I was getting an everyday amount anyway, so I need oodles because the problem wasn't that I wasn't getting it, but that I wasn't absorbing it.  Ditto vit B1.  A friend had a problem with that and developed dementia.  If you get symptoms of Korsakoff's dementia or of beriberi, it's a question of 'Quick, injections!'  But if you're not at that stage, it may be a question of just top up a bit then make sure the root cause, be it dietary or alcohol consumption or whatever doesn't stop your body getting enough in future.

So a nice bit of swotting up online for some impressive jargon and a plausible explanation, and some expressions of anxiety before appointments, followed by visible relief when the blood tests come through.  Oh, and don't forget the sticking plaster over where you've supposedly had the B12 injections if she's likely to see that bit of you.

Jockice

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2017, 04:39:25 PM »
I have an alternative solution to propose: lie.

Tell your annoying relative that you've discussed it with your neurologist and he's sure it isn't that and has done blood tests but you'll be having a couple of injections anyway before the next blood test to do a comparison in B12 levels and [insert something] levels and functioning of your [insert bit of you that doesn't function well].

Time was, I'd never have suggested that, but there does come a point.

As to why people have different patterns of injections, wouldn't it depend on why they needed them?  I mean, if it's for maintenance or something, maybe not very often, but if there are symptoms of severe deficiency plus an absorption problem, then maybe oodles of it to get that sorted, then less frequently?  After all, that's the sort of thing that gets done with various other deficiencies.

And to take a random example, I take vit A for my night-blindness.  Ordinarily if you had a problem that way, you might need a fair bit extra for a while, then just make sure you've got an everyday amount.  In my case, I was getting an everyday amount anyway, so I need oodles because the problem wasn't that I wasn't getting it, but that I wasn't absorbing it.  Ditto vit B1.  A friend had a problem with that and developed dementia.  If you get symptoms of Korsakoff's dementia or of beriberi, it's a question of 'Quick, injections!'  But if you're not at that stage, it may be a question of just top up a bit then make sure the root cause, be it dietary or alcohol consumption or whatever doesn't stop your body getting enough in future.

So a nice bit of swotting up online for some impressive jargon and a plausible explanation, and some expressions of anxiety before appointments, followed by visible relief when the blood tests come through.  Oh, and don't forget the sticking plaster over where you've supposedly had the B12 injections if she's likely to see that bit of you.

Nice idea, but it's a bit late as we're not talking to each other and as we live in different parts of the country we're unlikely to meet again for a while. I've had two years of it being her only topic of conversation and saying stuff about when (not if) my condition will improve due to B12 injections, despite there not being the slightest bit of medical evidence that this would be the case (and as I've told her numerous times, I have been through the whole 'this will definitely cure you' thing several times before, so please forgive me for not falling to my knees to honour this great miracle cure) so I'm quite prepared to just leave it until she wants to get in touch again (if indeed she does) and then only talk to her if she promises not to mention bloody B12 again.

There's plenty more I could say about this but there is a certain section of my family that has an obsessive streak and is incapable of letting things drop. So we'll see what happens in the future.

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2017, 05:55:43 PM »
The obsessive B12 advice reminds me of the days I used to get told all I needed to do was walk more. Years ago my GP said the brain damage that caused the CP I have might not be visible because it is a part of my brain that never grew to show the damage. It is not like a stroke can be.

Quote
There's plenty more I could say about this but there is a certain section of my family that has an obsessive streak and is incapable of letting things drop. So we'll see what happens in the future.

Oh but they just want you to be happy (normal) the best Jockice you can be  ;-) As my siblings get older, become arthritic, get kidney stones or whatever I might start telling them to be grateful for the 'expert' advice I give them  >erm<


Sunny Clouds

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #26 on: March 08, 2017, 05:56:30 PM »
Gosh, I can relate to that, but not with family, with friends.

I'm thinking of one friend who nearly lost my friendship.  whenever I mentioned my night-blindness, not as a major woe-is-me, it came on so gradually that I just adapted, but it could cause everyday problems and apart from anything else lead to anecdotes I thought she'd find amusing, I'd get a lecture on how women shouldn't go out after dark because it's dangerous.  In the end, I lost my rag and gave her quite a lecture about dark starting in our part of the UK mid-afternoon in winter, and about light receptors in the eye, how we use night vision in daytime, and how, even in broad daylight in the street, if I went into a Costa Coffee or similar, I couldn't see the table legs or people's legs, for example. 

I've currently got it on another messageboard where I reached the point where I daren't mention falls any more because every other reply (or on a good day, every third reply) tells me to use a walking stick.  One woman, after I'd explained why I don't use a walking stick - I almost always fall backwards and need, for safety reasons, if possible to rapidly redirect to a sideways fall and a stick  on one side can stop me doing that - gave me a lecture on  how I shouldn't be too embarassed to use a stick.  I decided that I'll avoid her at all costs in future.

So sorry to do this on a second thread, but you've made me feel better about my own situation where at least it isn't a relative doing this to me.


Jockice

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #27 on: March 08, 2017, 07:00:53 PM »
OK, I'll admit it. After a year of pressure I agreed to try the B12 injections. Although not prescribed by doctors (this person gets them from abroad). Probably taking a risk there but by this point I'd had enough and it was on the grounds that if they worked then great, but if they didn't the experiment was over.

I tried them, they made no difference to me at all. I didn't feel any better or any worse. So I stopped. But then I started getting lectures about how I was obviously not taking the right things (ie other vitamins) to make them work or I was taking things (ie energy drinks) that were stopping them from working. They are infallible after all. And my girlfriend also got lectured (separately) about how she should make sure I'm taking all these lovely things and then problems I've had for most of my life will vanish.

At which point things boiled over (although I wasn't the one who started shouting) and I told the other person that it was like dealing with someone who'd joined a religious cult and asked if I should tell the dozens of doctors I've seen over the years that they're all wrong because they don't look on Google like she does. We haven't spoken since. So there we go.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2017, 07:07:35 PM by Jockice »

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #28 on: March 08, 2017, 07:07:25 PM »
Your final gesture should have been to fall on top of her.  Splat!   >devil<

Jockice

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Re: Vitamin B12.
« Reply #29 on: March 08, 2017, 07:08:04 PM »
Your final gesture should have been to fall on top of her.  Splat!   >devil<

Don't think I wasn't tempted.

And by the way, you still don't know the half of it. I think I've actually been extremely tolerant. If you have a spare five hours or so I can tell you all about it.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2017, 07:09:48 PM by Jockice »