Author Topic: How to speed healing  (Read 1209 times)

Fiz

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How to speed healing
« on: March 11, 2017, 08:30:17 AM »
I've a large cut (don't ask   >blush< ) that is incredibly painful. A paramedic superglued it and steristripped it but it doesn't seem to be healing at all. It's a long cut down my hip so maybe where it is, constantly affected my movement isn't helping. Paramedic didn't cover it and I can't work out how to cover something that long, there either.

Any ideas on ways to encourage it to heal?

lankou

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2017, 08:35:48 AM »
It requires looking at by a medical professional.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2017, 11:22:44 AM »
Re. covering a long wound - consider sanitary towels or incontinence pads, depending on the length of the wound.  If it's a long one, if you look at incontinence/sanitary pads, most, if individually wrapped, are folded into three, giving you an idea of length. 

If the pad isn't sufficiently flexible while it's got the backing on, peel the backing off and to stop it sticking to your clothes, put a bit of tissue/loopaper along the sticky strip & tear off the surplus tissue either side.

Consider, if you can afford it, buying some close-fitting, strongly elasticated shorts/leggings to act like bandages.  Depending on how you like to dress, you can wear other clothes such as a skirt or trousers on top.

As for seeing someone about it, if you're hesitating, don't forget to keep a keen eye out for heat, redness, skin deterioration or anything else that looks/feels a bit dodgy.  Even a carefully looked-after injury can go a bit dodgy if any germs get in it, particularly if you're generally under the weather.

Rosie

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2017, 12:05:55 PM »
I agree with Sunny regarding sanitary towels or incontinence pads.  Twice when I ended up with stitch abscesses following breast tumour removals, my breast surgeon suggested cutting an ST in half to cover the wound yet let it drain, so I just shoved them down my bra until the wounds dried out and healed.

But the modern thin STs are not so good for nasty wounds.  The old-fashioned thick ones, or good incontinence pads, are far better. 

For a long wound I would suggest holding the pad on with something like micropore  as even though you need the wound to heal, you need to have some air got to it.
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AndMac

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2017, 08:34:29 PM »
I have every sympathy. I managed to slice myself open in that area on a jagged piece of metal in a very run down public toilet in Sunderland once...
I couldn't afford to take time off work and patched myself up that day with a panty liner and sellotape, then held the wound together with plasters. It healed fairly straightforwardly but I advise keeping a firm eye on it.
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Sunny Clouds

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2017, 09:16:33 PM »
Perhaps we should be suggesting to the manufacturers of sanitary and incontinence products that they could advertise them as being dual-use.  "The emergency field dressing in your handbag, for use in the battlefields of modern life."

huhn

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2017, 06:41:54 AM »
thanks for this idea >hugs< >hugs< >hugs< >hugs< >hugs<

Rosie

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2017, 08:22:30 AM »
Perhaps we should be suggesting to the manufacturers of sanitary and incontinence products that they could advertise them as being dual-use.  "The emergency field dressing in your handbag, for use in the battlefields of modern life."

Somewhere, some time ago, I read a suggestion for a home emergency first aid kit.  And it included panty liners for minor cuts, full size sanitary pads [specified not the then new thin ones] for major ones.   It also suggested keeping a roll of sellotape as well as a roll of micropore.
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SteveX

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2017, 08:12:16 PM »
>hugs<
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Rosie

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2017, 08:54:02 PM »
Perhaps we should be suggesting to the manufacturers of sanitary and incontinence products that they could advertise them as being dual-use.  "The emergency field dressing in your handbag, for use in the battlefields of modern life."

Been thinking.  Incontinence pads are not really that good for long wounds as they tend to be elasticated round the edges and do not fit flat.  Sanitary towels [the thick ones] are much better.  The modern thin STs are absorbent but they do not protect a wound from any accidental bump.

I have a mini first-aid kit that I keep in a bag for if I go out.  A general larger one for emergencies at home, and that includes anything I might need for the puppy, and a box of spares to replace anything I might have to use.   
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Sunny Clouds

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2017, 12:43:09 PM »
My incontinence pads aren't elasticated, they're a bit like sanitary towels or panty liners, except they're thicker and longer so they'll take a bladder-full of urine.  As it happens, I've never seen elasticated ones, only pants that are elasticated round the edges (including the side-fastening ones like disposable baby nappies) so I hadn't considered the possibility they might be, but of course there are people who use pads for full incontinence that they wear with washable pants, and it makes perfect sense to me that they would have elasticated sides. 

I'm glad you pointed it out, because I agree with you that it's an important thing to take into account.   To my way of thinking, it means that anyone wanting to buy incontinence pads to use as dressings needs to check the packets carefully to make sure they're the plain flat ones not the ones with the elasticated edges. 

I also think your point about protecting a wound from bumps is important, and when I read it, I suddenly went back to my student days of improvising with a  hankie as dressing and a large facecloth folded into three or four as padding.  It's funny the things you remember, isn't it?

Maybe we should have a creativity competition.  My entry is bubble wrap for protection round a wound.  If you bump it, you'll not only be protected, but distracted by the popping noises and hopefully get a smile to cheer you up.

Rosie

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2017, 02:25:01 PM »
Maybe elasticated is not the word - but the pads I get are definitely not flat like STs but are sort of gathered at the edges so they curve to fit the body.  Like Tena Comfort [I do not think those are made any more] but Tena Light Pads are similar.

The pads I get now are Seni Lady - I think the ones the company used to send were Abrisan.  They also supply huge packs of loo paper, paper towels for wall-mounted towel holders, bleach, loo cleaner, baby wipes and - really useful - adult wipes which are about six times larger [and thicker] than baby wipes and are perfect for a good wipe down when I just cannot face showering.  I do not chuck them either, but put in a bucket and then in the washing machine with the next wash, as they make excellent dusters.  Or - folded up they make dry wound dressings.

With an open or still healing wound, protecting it from bumps and knocks really is important, because it is so easy to open up a wound just with the slightest knock.  And with skin as thin as mine, it does not take much to split it open.
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Sunny Clouds

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2017, 05:33:03 PM »
I'd never thought about it before, but when I look at first aid items in shops, especially chemists' shops, apart from cushioned finger plasters, there doesn't appear to be anything else labelled cushioned.  Maybe there'd be a market for it.

Mind you, I say to people who stumble near me that they should fall on top of me because I'm well-cushioned so soft to land on.  Indeed, I've got at least two and a half stones worth of too much cushioning. 

Hopefully we're providing a little emotional cushioning for Fizz?

 >bighugs<

Rosie

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2017, 05:57:04 PM »
I'd never thought about it before, but when I look at first aid items in shops, especially chemists' shops, apart from cushioned finger plasters, there doesn't appear to be anything else labelled cushioned.  Maybe there'd be a market for it.

There is not any.  Nor can you find anything but small regular size plasters/bandaids/whatever you call them.  But you can get them if you know from where.

I sometimes need large plasters when I gouge my shins, and the wounds need to have antiseptic ointment and be fully covered for a few days until they have healed enough without going nasty.  I found what I needed, from AliExpress in China.  They are described as suitable for C-section covering and were just what I needed.  Actually I stocked up my first aid box with things from there although the antiseptic ointment and other things came from iHerb in the US.  If I cannot get what I want and/or need here, I know where to get  them.

Never having had a C-section I did not know the wound should be covered - when I had a hysterectomy yonks ago in England they just put a piece of kitchen paper over my wound!

Quote
Hopefully we're providing a little emotional cushioning for Fizz?  >bighugs<

If not cushioning, maybe a bit of a giggle!  I mean a boob consultant telling me to cut an ST in half and shove it down my bra?!
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Fiz

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Re: How to speed healing
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2017, 07:37:00 PM »
For cuts that aren't as long, I am prescribed Allevyn dressings which I get on prescription and have a box at home to use when needed. They're sterile and VERY cushioned so normally fantastic but these cuts are just too long. Stupidly after 2 days I lay in bed and peeled the steri strips off not having a clue what that would mean. Both cuts completely reopened so the glue obviously wasn't that great! Only the middle section of the cuts were bleeding so I've got Allevyn over the middle section and each end of the cut is open to the air.

I'm desperate for the bad cut to be healed enough for me to swim/jacuzzi on Thursday as I've had a Groupon spa day booked for months. Allevyn are showerproof dressings which is great but they won't cope with immersion. I'm so annoyed with myself.

I highly recommend Allevyn to anyone that needs cushioned dressings, they were originally prescribed to me by my surgery's specialist wound care nurse and now my GP just has them on repeat for me as needed along with Inodene to kill any germs off the wound may hold.