Author Topic: SCOPE statement about the General election  (Read 675 times)

lankou

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SCOPE statement about the General election
« on: April 20, 2017, 12:43:00 PM »


https://www.scope.org.uk/About-Us/Media/Press-releases/April-2017/Scope-response-to-general-election-announcement?utm_source=t.co&utm_medium=referral


18 April 2017

Scope responds to the Prime Minister’s announcement of a general election to be held on 8 June.

Mark Atkinson Chief Executive of disability charity Scope, said: 
   
“This election will be hugely important to disabled people in Britain and they will be looking closely at the policies and proposals from all parties. 
   
 "Scope polling of disabled people and their priorities for Government highlight that 70 per cent of disabled people believe disability benefits should be protected, 56 per cent believe there should be an increase in investment in social care and 54 per cent believe action should be taken on the extra costs disabled people face. 
   
 "There are 13 million disabled people in Britain – a hugely significant number of votes – and 89 per cent have said they will vote at the next election. We’d urge all candidates to talk to and listen to their concerns, hopes and aspirations so that any government can build a country that works better for disabled people and delivers everyday equality. 
   
 "Scope will be working with disabled people from right across the country to make sure that their voices are heard and that disability equality is a key issue in this election.”
 
   


 








   

Sunny Clouds

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Re: SCOPE statement about the General election
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2017, 09:52:47 PM »
Scope's figures will be torn apart.  They give an overall number for disabled people then a percentage for those that say they will vote.

However, they do not say whether the figure for the number of disabled people is the number of disabled people eligible to vote and capable of voting, or whether it's the total number of disabled people.  Insofar as they refer to it simply as the number of disabled people, then giving the percentage that say they will vote isn't actually terribly helpful.  It would have been more helpful to give rough figures for disabled voters, expressed both as an absolute number and as a percentage of voters, followed bythe percentage of those that say they will vote expressed also as a percentage of overall voters..

lankou

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Re: SCOPE statement about the General election
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2017, 08:20:41 AM »

Sunny Clouds

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Re: SCOPE statement about the General election
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2017, 01:30:46 PM »
It doesn't matter whose data they are, what matters is how they're presented.

Imagine you're an ordinary reader.  You don't know what proportion of which generation is disabled or what way they're disabled in.  So you don't know what proportion of those disabled people are old enough to vote or eligible to vote or capable of voting.  For all you know, as someone with no particular interest in the subject, maybe the majority of the people in the proportion of people who are disabled statistic fall into a hotch-potch of stereotypical categories of 'lacking the intellectual capacity to vote', 'kiddies that won't grow up', 'demented so probably aren't allowed to vote', 'oldies that can't get as far as a polling station', 'foreigners that aren't eligible to vote', 'in a hospice or intensive care', and so on.  In other words, from the reader's point of view, the percentage of voters that are disabled could be the figure cited as the percentage of people who are disabled or of just a part of it, and if just a part of it, it could be a very small part of it if they picture most disabled people as not eligible to vote.

Unless Scope gives figures that are clearly and unambiguously, 'X percent of people eligible to vote are disabled, and surveys/polls show that Y percent of disabled people that are eligible to vote/ Y percent of disabled people overall are expected to vote, which is Z percent of all people expected to vote' the figures are meaningless.

It makes not one jot of difference where they got their figures as their target audience, which I rather suppose is those that  they want to convince to take disabled people seriously but who currently don't, will probably mostly not go away and look up whether the proportion of people who are disabled figure is the proportion  of expected voters who are disabled or the proportion of the population as a whole who are disabled.

The figures can be accurate to umpteen percentage points, verified by oodles of sources etc., but unless they're clearly expressed, they're pointless.

You and I are the sort of people that go away and check the figures, but how many of those that Scope is trying to convince actually want to or have time to?
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 02:20:29 PM by Sunny Clouds »

oldtone27

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Re: SCOPE statement about the General election
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2017, 01:54:10 PM »
"Lies, damned lies, and statistics"?

Sunny Clouds

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Re: SCOPE statement about the General election
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2017, 02:27:42 PM »
That's about the measure of it.

The main political parties aren't going to be using statistics in that way.  They may distort them, they may not, but they'll present them as unambiguously as they can, using ones that suit them wherever possible.

I have had issue with Scope's pronouncements before, but that's not why I'm unhappy with this, because on the whole I think they're a good organisation. 

lankou

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Re: SCOPE statement about the General election
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2017, 02:34:47 PM »
The point is there are a large number of Tory marginals with far more disabled people in them than is needed to put the sitting Tory out of office by voting tactically.
The stark fact is we are facing another five years of Tory government unless people vote tactically to keep them out.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: SCOPE statement about the General election
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2017, 03:21:03 PM »
I agree completely with that.  My disappointment is just with how Scope went about getting that message across. 

I'm no longer feeling just depressed or even desperate over the current politics, I'm also feeling very sad, grieving.  My politics are what I'd describe as boundary Green/Corbyn.  I had high hopes for Corbyn.  However, his refusal to enter into any sort of alliance or coalition with other parties tells me why he can't keep his own party together:  in practical terms, he's not prepared to enter into an alliance or coalition with other factions within his own party.

If the Tories were to get in anyway, it wouldn't surprise me, so probably wouldn't increase my great distress, but for Corbyn to refuse to enter into some sort of co-ordinated opposition leaves me thinking that we're going to get not just five more years of Tory, but maybe 10 more or longer.  Even if it were a party I supported, that's too long.

I wish the right wing of the Labour party (which I don't agree with politically) would desert Corbyn, set up their own party, then go into an alliance with the other parties.  Better what I think of as Blue Labour in coalition with Greens, SNP, Plaid Cwmri, independents etc. than what we've got.  I don't doubt Corbyn's left wing credentials, so what's happening with him?  But then he was always a rebel,  ignoring the Labour whip. 

And meanwhile, Labour in the Lords and in the Commons have just let anti-disabled measure after anti-disabled measure go sailing through.