Author Topic: Disabled people and pet care  (Read 718 times)

SunshineMeadows

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Disabled people and pet care
« on: May 10, 2017, 08:25:24 AM »
Megs my collie collapsed and we thought we were going to lose her. She is better today and we are waiting for blood tests results. Without Mr Sunshine carrying Meg's in and out the garden to go to the toilet, and him carrying her into the vets I dont know how we would have managed. He is still having physio for his ankle and can walk short distances. The fact he works means there is more money coming in and so we can afford the cost of the blood test. Al this made me wonder about how difficult it can be for disabled people to maintain ownership of their pets and how important having a pet is to us.

Maybe we could talk about this and people could add pet care tips.

 :-)

JLR2

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2017, 08:33:35 AM »
I don't have any pets now and apart from my ex local gf's, who now is happily married, cats I've only had the wee birds I feed in my garden. The two King Charles Cavaliers I had at the time of my car crash were given by my sister to another family as she decided I wouldn't be able to look after them and to some extent I can understand why she thought that. I still miss wee Blue and Suzy. Were it not for my regular visits to Berlin I think I would think again about having another wee pup, as I tend to  call all my dogs, at present I don't even have potted plants at home for fear of them not having enough water when I'm away..

Rosie

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2017, 11:32:19 AM »
When my wonderful Vet saw the difficulty I had in taking Lexi to the surgery for their annual shots, he always came here.  The as he did with Pereg.  But when my beloved Pereg developed the dreaded Monster called epilepsy, I had to take her to the surgery every three months for blood tests - which involved not only my taxi driver taking her leash and into his car, but also my manual wheelchair and me.  Then collecting me again.  And the four years of uncontrollable violent seizures took its toll on me.

When I needed more medication for her [Phenobarbitone, both 100mg and 5mg as she was having 65mg TID] I would telephone me Vet to order then, pay by my card - he would telephone me when they were in and my driver would go to collect them.  6 months' supply at a time.  Good job my bungalow is burglar-proof, having that many barbiturates here!  >biggrin<

He even came here at about 1am to give her peace.

With little Tikva, who I adopted/rescued when she was just three weeks old, which meant bottle feeding every couple of hours day and night, then weaning her - I let myself in for yet more difficulties and exhaustion.  But my Vet always comes here for her shots/worm pills - and now the three-monthly Parkworm shot.  The only times she has been to the surgery was when his new assistant Vet, who he "appointed" to be Tikva's primary Vet, took both of us to the surgery to be spayed, then she brought her homee that afternoon.  When she left the practice to do more studying, even though she was fully qualified, my Vet took over and he comes here.  The only other time was recently when she developed a sudden allergic reaction to something she must have picked up in the yard - being unfenced probably a kid threw something in or maybe she was bitten by something? 

OK so I have to pay a call-out charge but it is very little more than the taxi fares, and it is much much easier and far less stress for both Tikva and me.

Yearly rabies shots [and initial microchipping] are done by the Local Authority vet, who comes here when he is checking on the poultry or cows on the Moshav, as he is not a small animal vet but in charge of meat, effs, milk for human consumption.  He never charges me for the visit or the rabies shots and microchipping.

She will be two-years old next Wednesday and she is a little booga of a mini-monster!  I must have been mad to adopt such a tiny puppy so soon, especially at my advanced age, but the silence after losing Pereg was too much to bear. 

I cannot give an tips of my own, although I can advise/suggest things about food [I feed raw - basically the BARF diet] but I can usually find answers to questions from other pet owners.  I am a member of a specific dog forum so if I do not know the answer or cannot find it, I can always ask on that forum for information.
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Sunny Clouds

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2017, 02:54:59 PM »
I had cats for years, all 'secondhand' and mostly with problems, as it were.

There are parts of  the UK where the PDSA will help with free/cheap vet treatment and there are some rescue services that will give you a sort of guarantee with a pet.  I had one riddled with arthritis and the vet billed the charity directly for the treatment for the arthritis.

In some ways I wish I'd still got a cat, but I lost 3 in 2 years and I'm also very unsettled as regards moving (I'm expecting to move out of here any time between about 6 months and 2yrs from now, and I don't want to be tied down as to where I can move as I  may make a multi-stage move.  But cats gave me comfort.

They were also brilliant for the military ptsd as my hearing loss got worse.  So long as my traumatised cat didn't suddenly react, then I felt safe.  (You can guess I wouldn't, for that reason, adopt a deaf cat). 

I had a cat that used to come for walks with me.  I missed her terribly when she died.

lankou

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2017, 03:06:55 PM »

Rosie

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2017, 04:07:08 PM »
Oh lankou that is such a lovely picture - is he/she a service dog? 
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lankou

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2017, 05:32:52 PM »
Oh lankou that is such a lovely picture - is he/she a service dog?

I have no idea, it was a random pick off of Google Images.

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2017, 08:27:17 AM »
JLR,

King Charles Cavaliers are so cute hopefully you might have another one sometime in the future. We are lucky enough to have friends who own a kennels so the go that extra mile for us. For example when Mr Sunshine broke his leg Bran and Luca went into kennels giving us space to get things sorted.

Rosie,

Your post reminds me of how pets can grab onto your heart and you end up pushing your body further than is good for you. We love them so much because of all they give to us. It is great the vets will come out to you and the cost s not prohibitive, her in UK some vets charge over 100 to come out and put a vet to sleep. Then again if we had children they would cost a lot more. Tikva two already from such a small beginning amazing.

Sunny,

I did not realise you had lost three cats in two years that is a lot to deal with  >bighugs< I can see what you mean about cats and PTSD. Our dogs make good alarms and would put anyone up to know good off trying anything but sometimes they bark and run around when there is nothing to worry about. Since Bran now sleeps downstairs the cats are back in the bedroom snuggling up and making it hard for me to move. I can see a situation arising if I become more disabled and have a higher degree of pain where I might have to shut the cats out but at the same time they are my cats so that outcome is unlikely.

I had two rescue cats each died within a year and it has put me off getting another female adult cat. I got Susie as a kitchen so most of her life has been a good one.

If we lived near enough to the rescue centre I would like to volunteer for cuddle duty. I hope your next home allows you to have another cat.

Rosie

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2017, 11:06:04 AM »
Sunshine - I do not know how much Ram charged me to come and give Pereg peace.  I had left my wallet on the table beside my keyboard and told him to take however much it was, but it was probably nearer 50 if that. 

He charges about half that for a home visit for shots, plus the cost of the shots, and there is no charge for a consultation fee if you take your pet to the surgery, just for any medication or treatment and as I said, it would not cost me much less for a taxi to come from town, take us to the surgery, and then come to collect us to take us home.

I do hope that Megs will be OK and better soon.

Sunny - I was sorry to hear about your cats.  I had a cat before I rescued little Lexi - actually Kat [short for Kattypuss, do not ask!] was still with me when I brought Lexi home - she was most put out by the puppy, who was a timid little thing and used wander out and in again most of the day.  But one day she did not come home for her evening meal, and I never saw her again.   :-(
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NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2017, 11:23:31 AM »
First of all  >bighugs< for everyone here who has lost a beloved pet. As George gets older, I find myself wondering how I will cope when he's gone, and hoping that the pain will be balanced by knowing that he lived a long and happy life.


Sunshine - how is Megs doing now? I hope she's a bit better  >hugs<


I've tried to make things with George as easy as possible. I've encouraged him to use my bedroom window to come and go from the house, meaning less to-ing and fro-ing for me. He is fed dry food, so his dish only needs filled twice a day, so he can eat whenever he pleases, and I use a bottle of water to top up his water dishes, rather than having to transport them to and from the sink.  The dishes are placed on one-handed trays (pictured here):

https://www.completecareshop.co.uk/beds-and-bedding/bed-trays/handy-tray-with-non-slip-mat-view-large?gclid=CNmIl-nG59MCFYSd7QodZTgFNw

This means that when the dishes need washed, I can pick them up without bending, or climbing out of my wheelchair. 

Getting to the vet is a bit of a challenge, so I try to schedule routine appointments for times of the day when I know that George will be sleepy and (slightly) docile, so that he can be popped into the cat carrier without a massive scrap, which is stressful for both of us. Extensive bribing with treats also helps.  Taxi drivers seem happy enough to carry George to their car or into the vets for me, and usually a vetinary nurse will help with getting him back out into the taxi for the journey home.

What I find very difficult is feeling useless when he does a vanshing act, and friends and neighbours are out distributing leaflets and knocking on doors while I'm stuck at home. But there are still important things I can do for George - ringing round the vets and rescue centres to advise them to keep and eye out, printing up a ready supply of leaflets, keeping track of which streets have been covered, to avoid duplication, and most of all, staying by the phone in case of news, and being in a position to call off the search if he arrives home while everyone else is out looking for him.


And finally, that is a very lovely picture, L'Ankou. Thanks for that!
 

>bighugs< 


>Editing to add: Having just re-read the opening post, I now see that most of this post is off-topic. Sorry.  >blush< >doh<
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 01:32:53 PM by NeuralgicNeurotic »

lankou

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2017, 11:41:34 AM »

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2017, 12:08:12 PM »
Leaving aside cats I grew up with and that I lived with when living in digs etc., I've had 7 cats.  I think maybe you'll understand my thinking if I say that I reckon that a cat that's had maybe a bit of a rough time and has been lonely will somehow relate better to a human like that.  It seems to work.


lankou

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2017, 12:17:55 PM »
Not really relevant to the thread but my neighbours two dogs give me about three seconds of attention then go back to trying to "kill" each other.

huhn

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2017, 01:01:00 PM »
not only dogs are like this, my children are the same >run< >run< >run< >run< >run< >run< >run< >run< >run< >run< >run<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Disabled people and pet care
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2017, 01:07:54 PM »
 >lol<