Author Topic: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'  (Read 2633 times)

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« on: May 25, 2017, 08:06:02 AM »
This article appeared a couple of days ago. It's a nice idea:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/healthy-living/boring-self-care-hannah-daisy-instagram-health-wellbeing-a7741656.html


Quote
As a survivor of mental illness and endometriosis, occupational therapist Hannah Daisy knows what it’s like to struggle to get out of bed in the morning.

“At times I have felt very tired and even small tasks have felt overwhelming.” Daisy says.

It's a feeling that many who live with an illness, disability or mental health issue can identify with. Facing the daily to-do list of run-of-the-mill tasks like making the bed, washing the dishes, and doing the laundry can feel especially onerous – but those small acts of self-care can also bring us more comfort and improve our wellbeing.

That's why Daisy, 32, has launched her “#BoringSelfCare” illustration series, which aims to celebrate the small victories of accomplishing daily acts of self-care.




Quote
“I started noticing that online, self-care was talked about in a very different way, often only about nice lovely things you can do for yourself, like a bubble bath, a massage, buying nice crystals, etc. In my profession, we talk about self-care involving a much wider range of ‘occupations’ or things you have to do every day. For example, doing the dishes, washing, dressing, housework and laundry,” Daisy says.

“I started to draw these tasks and call them ‘#boringselfcare’ and share them on Instagram. I was amazed at the amount of people who could relate.

“I think in all honesty, anyone who has had mental health problems and/or chronic illness would be able to relate, as these everyday tasks can feel really difficult or impossible,” she adds.

Daisy’s Instagram account @makedaisychains has already gained more than 20,500 followers, with drawings that celebrate small acts like going outside and getting some fresh air, going grocery shopping, and cooking and eating a nourishing meal.

The occupational therapist’s initiative comes as one Facebook user recently opened up about how difficult her experience with depression made it for her to tackle daily acts of self-care.




Quote
Katelyn Todd posted a photo of herself brushing her hair for the first time in four weeks on Facebook. “It was matted and twisted together. It snapped and tore with every stroke. I cried while I washed and conditioned it, because I forgot how it felt to run my fingers through it,” Ms Todd wrote in the post, which has been shared more than 291,000 times.

“I brushed my teeth too, for the first time in a week. My gums bled. My water ran red. I cried over that, as well. When I got out of the shower. I couldn't stop sniffing my hair and arms. I've avoided hugging people for awhile because I never smell good. I always smell like I've been on bedrest for a week. I have no clean clothes, because I'm too tired and sad to wash them.”

Ms Todd urges for people to “Please be easy on your friends and family that have trouble getting up the energy to clean, hang out, or take care of themselves,” adding: “And please, please take them seriously if they talk to you about it. We’re trying. See? I brushed my hair today.”




Quote
Daisy, who has worked in the mental health field for 10 years, says Ms Todd’s experience reflects the reality of many people struggling with depression and other debilitating illnesses, disabilities and mental health issues.

That’s why she believes it’s important to celebrate small acts of self-care.

“I think it’s especially important for those living with chronic illness or mental health problems because people still need to find a way to navigate doing basic tasks.

“I think it can help to think about it, especially if you have to calculate how much energy you have, but also to know that there is worth in doing boring tasks and that boring tasks can be an act of caring for yourself.”

“I think beating yourself up is one of the worst things you can do,” the occupational therapist adds.

“If you live with chronic illness or mental health problems and you managed to get up and get dressed, this is worth celebrating.”


auntieCtheM

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2017, 09:08:36 PM »
boring self-care - this article really speaks to me.  Thank you for posting it.

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2017, 09:33:10 PM »
So true, as any struggling person will identify with - and let's face it, these are the kinds of activities that we get 'tested' for in order to qualify for ESA and/or PIP, so they're much more relevant than all those crystals and massages (who has access to a massage if they're a single householder, anyway?!)

AndMac

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2017, 02:47:02 PM »
This is a really lovely and supportive thread on MoneySavingExpert http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=2039611 where I often post of my small victories in this area, although mine are physical victories as much as mental ones.

One of the regular posters has two sons on the autistic spectrum, so often their victories are her victories and are celebrated too.
"I might repeat to myself slowly and soothingly, a list of quotations beautiful from minds profound - if I can remember any of the damn things".

Dorothy Parker

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2017, 11:37:43 AM »
https://www.instagram.com/makedaisychains/ my favourite is

Woke up and got out of bed before 12 - and the picture is of a clock saying 11:59 am

AndMac,

Is this the link you were trying to add http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=2039611 sorry I cant remember how to do the fancier edit link thingum.

They have now started a new part 3 thread http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5681214 5 OS pleasures in your day today - part 3 what does OS in the title mean? Sorry I have foggy brain.

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2017, 04:56:02 PM »
OS appears to mean Old Style (Money Saving)... which in turn, having looked at the thread, seems to refer to the enjoyment of simple pleasures that cost little or nothing (good idea for a thread, I thought!)

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2017, 10:25:29 PM »
OS pleasures in my day.

- Finding out what OS means - thank you Kizzy

- being in the garden and getting a bit scared at how windy it was,

- catching sight of a big garden spider scurrying passed my knees and being able to stop moving without getting hurt. Sort of Yikes then awww hello Mr Spider that was a close call.

Fiz

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2017, 07:32:50 AM »
This article appeared a couple of days ago. It's a nice idea:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/healthy-living/boring-self-care-hannah-daisy-instagram-health-wellbeing-a7741656.html


Quote
As a survivor of mental illness and endometriosis, occupational therapist Hannah Daisy knows what it’s like to struggle to get out of bed in the morning.

“At times I have felt very tired and even small tasks have felt overwhelming.” Daisy says.

It's a feeling that many who live with an illness, disability or mental health issue can identify with. Facing the daily to-do list of run-of-the-mill tasks like making the bed, washing the dishes, and doing the laundry can feel especially onerous – but those small acts of self-care can also bring us more comfort and improve our wellbeing.

That's why Daisy, 32, has launched her “#BoringSelfCare” illustration series, which aims to celebrate the small victories of accomplishing daily acts of self-care.




Quote
“I started noticing that online, self-care was talked about in a very different way, often only about nice lovely things you can do for yourself, like a bubble bath, a massage, buying nice crystals, etc. In my profession, we talk about self-care involving a much wider range of ‘occupations’ or things you have to do every day. For example, doing the dishes, washing, dressing, housework and laundry,” Daisy says.

“I started to draw these tasks and call them ‘#boringselfcare’ and share them on Instagram. I was amazed at the amount of people who could relate.

“I think in all honesty, anyone who has had mental health problems and/or chronic illness would be able to relate, as these everyday tasks can feel really difficult or impossible,” she adds.

Daisy’s Instagram account @makedaisychains has already gained more than 20,500 followers, with drawings that celebrate small acts like going outside and getting some fresh air, going grocery shopping, and cooking and eating a nourishing meal.

The occupational therapist’s initiative comes as one Facebook user recently opened up about how difficult her experience with depression made it for her to tackle daily acts of self-care.




Quote
Katelyn Todd posted a photo of herself brushing her hair for the first time in four weeks on Facebook. “It was matted and twisted together. It snapped and tore with every stroke. I cried while I washed and conditioned it, because I forgot how it felt to run my fingers through it,” Ms Todd wrote in the post, which has been shared more than 291,000 times.

“I brushed my teeth too, for the first time in a week. My gums bled. My water ran red. I cried over that, as well. When I got out of the shower. I couldn't stop sniffing my hair and arms. I've avoided hugging people for awhile because I never smell good. I always smell like I've been on bedrest for a week. I have no clean clothes, because I'm too tired and sad to wash them.”

Ms Todd urges for people to “Please be easy on your friends and family that have trouble getting up the energy to clean, hang out, or take care of themselves,” adding: “And please, please take them seriously if they talk to you about it. We’re trying. See? I brushed my hair today.”




Quote
Daisy, who has worked in the mental health field for 10 years, says Ms Todd’s experience reflects the reality of many people struggling with depression and other debilitating illnesses, disabilities and mental health issues.

That’s why she believes it’s important to celebrate small acts of self-care.

“I think it’s especially important for those living with chronic illness or mental health problems because people still need to find a way to navigate doing basic tasks.

“I think it can help to think about it, especially if you have to calculate how much energy you have, but also to know that there is worth in doing boring tasks and that boring tasks can be an act of caring for yourself.”

“I think beating yourself up is one of the worst things you can do,” the occupational therapist adds.

“If you live with chronic illness or mental health problems and you managed to get up and get dressed, this is worth celebrating.”


Wow I can so relate to every word of that. I can go weeks without washing or changing clothes and refuse to allow my GP to visit because I know I smell so bad. I feel guilty when I'm not getting any 'boring self care' done but feel a sense of achievement when I finally manage to shower and wash my hair when a good day finally comes. I will look her up on instagram, shame she's not on Facebook. It would be so good if the mentally healthy general public knew how impossible it can be to do the smallest thing, I'd love to share some informative posts there. Before reading that I honestly thought it was just me that went weeks without any personal care and know I'm smelly.

Fiz

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2017, 08:11:08 AM »
Oh and adding to my comments above one of the reasons I discharged myself from CMHT is because the professionals don't understand the inability to complete personal care. I've lost count of the times I've been told that coming out of this depression is ultimately up to me and that I need to get washed and dressed and get out and socialise and that will make me better. Do they honestly think that I wouldn't do that if I could?! They had no comprehension of an inability to care for oneself physically and I didn't need the constant implication that it was all my fault.

seegee

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2017, 07:57:24 PM »
 You are certainly not the only one who can go for days/ weeks without washing clothes or yourself, Fiz, I've been there a few times too. >hugs<

Sounds like CMHT in your area have forgotten their training. :-( We were taught that lack of energy, fatigue & difficulties with motivation were all common parts of some illnesses when we did our RMN training. 

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2017, 12:54:54 PM »
Oh and adding to my comments above one of the reasons I discharged myself from CMHT is because the professionals don't understand the inability to complete personal care. I've lost count of the times I've been told that coming out of this depression is ultimately up to me and that I need to get washed and dressed and get out and socialise and that will make me better. Do they honestly think that I wouldn't do that if I could?! They had no comprehension of an inability to care for oneself physically and I didn't need the constant implication that it was all my fault.


You are certainly not the only one who can go for days/ weeks without washing clothes or yourself, Fiz, I've been there a few times too. >hugs< 

Same here >bighugs<

Fiz, it sounds like your old CMHT only know how to deal with milder forms of depression, or depression that is responding well to standard treatment, rather than severe and treatment resistant forms of the illness. I don't blame you for leaving!

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2017, 04:21:45 PM »
Quote
You are certainly not the only one who can go for days/ weeks without washing clothes or yourself, Fiz, I've been there a few times too. >hugs<

I have never been diagnosed as clinically depressed so I dont know how this relates to people who have, but I do find that when I stop checking how I look in the mirror I also stop caring how I look or maybe it is the other way around. When pain and other symptoms put me in hermit mode I might not go out and see people for weeks or months so I don't even think about wearing make up. I have thick eyebrows and it can be a shock to noticed they have grown feral. I have never been a girly girly and know they are only eyebrows but still it does matter.

One 'tip' about not washing is to try to wear clean clothes even if you have not had a shower. It wont make for a clean body but it will help with people's reactions.

I managed to clean up the majority of the dog poop in the garden today. It means I can play 'big ball' with Megs without having the ball rolled up the garden path all pooey. It is the first time I spent longer than a few minutes outside in about 5days.

 >star<

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2017, 05:50:04 PM »
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I managed to clean up the majority of the dog poop in the garden today. It means I can play 'big ball' with Megs without having the ball rolled up the garden path all pooey. It is the first time I spent longer than a few minutes outside in about 5days.

Nice one, Sunshine  >thumbsup<

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2017, 09:37:38 PM »
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When pain and other symptoms put me in hermit mode I might not go out and see people for weeks or months so I don't even think about wearing make up. I have thick eyebrows and it can be a shock to noticed they have grown feral.

When pain or depression rob me of spoons, the alarming thing is how rat's-nesty my hair gets. It looks like I should be swathed in goat skins and living in a mountain cave. 

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Celebrating small acts of 'Boring Self-Care'
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2017, 08:40:39 PM »
 >attachment< >hugs<