Author Topic: Whit a fright  (Read 690 times)

JLR2

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Whit a fright
« on: May 27, 2017, 11:28:01 AM »
Just came in from my back garden, ah wis cutting a bit of grass, and found the postie had left the mail on my door mat amongst which were  >yikes< two brown envelopes from Belfast. On a lovely bright sunny day I get these things on my doormat :-(  OK so I compose myself, settle doon wi'a mug of coffee and me obligatory ciggy and begin the process of learning my fate.....my mortgage interest payment payments are being changed was the subject of the first I looked at the other was telling me about the first letter I looked at  and how it would impact my benefit payments :-)   I feel a bit more relaxed noo but just as many who are in the same situation as myself, no' the mortgage thing, waiting for that reassessment or call to transfer to PiP from DLA the wurry/fear the next post could have just that letter is never far from my thoughts, it's like being scared to feel too happy.

I still find myself wondering if things so far as the DLA/PiP transfers go have been put on hold in Scotland till the Scottish government have decided how they are going to run the bits of the DWP that have been moved to Scottish control?

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2017, 11:34:05 AM »
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waiting for that reassessment or call to transfer to PiP from DLA the wurry/fear the next post could have just that letter is never far from my thoughts, it's like being scared to feel too happy.

I know the feeling  >bighugs<

JLR2

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2017, 11:59:46 AM »
In the course of talking with the psychologist I have been seeing over recent weeks, I was referred following my asking my GP for help in controlling my contemplating doing something daft if you get my meaning, she suggested that I simply didn't think at all about reassessments or when the next brown envelope might be waiting for me on the doormat rather I should more or less think about the birds, the scenery or maybe something like my next shopping trip, sorry but to me that just sounds like she is expecting me to delude myself.

She also suggested that I stop watching the news for any benefits related stories that might be talked about and that I should not pay any attention to some web based stories such as the one I told her about where the story was about how the DWP 'do' have targets for 80% of mandatory reconsiderations to be rejected. I cannot help but feel the government wants this fear, of reassessment, to be in claimants minds 24/7 their idea being some, maybe not many, will take their own life because of the pressure and stress brought about by simply not knowing from one day to the next.

One thing about that day when many of us received a lifetime award of our benefit was that it helped many of us relax that wee bit. Sure we knew that our benefit award letter did say that the decision could be looked at again if there were changes in our condition or situation but knowing how disabled we were we could not see that ever being an issue as our serious disabilities were not going to get better any time soon. In effect our governments since Blair's government started its involvement with Unum Provident connected advisors have been keen to convince everybody that there were no known disabilities that could not be cured through either starvation, resulting from loss of benefits, or good old fashioned hard work. It's a nightmare and I cannot see any light being lit any time soon. The best I'm hoping for is that the Scottish government reinstate the lifetime awards to those who had it under the old system.

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2017, 05:35:31 PM »
Sorry you've got the old brown envelope anxiety, JLR - it sucks, is all I can say.  Honestly, at one point I almost got to a stage where I would have been glad to see the bloody DLA-to-PIP transfer letter just to get it over with...

(as it happens, although I lost my lower-rate mobility component equivalent I did keep the higher rate care bit, ie 'enhanced daily living' in PIP terms, for three years.  I thought I'd be getting nothing.  And the PIP was awarded without a face-to-face assessment as well.  Pretty good result)

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One thing about that day when many of us received a lifetime award of our benefit was that it helped many of us relax that wee bit.

Relax??  What do you think being on benefit is, a form of financial security??  Don't you realise that being 'parked on benefits' is bad for you psychologically and that 'work is the best means out of poverty' as well as very good for your mental health?  (and would everybody please excuse the huge raspberry that follows ....)

JLR2

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2017, 07:06:03 PM »
Hi Kizzy, I don't know about thinking of benefits as a form of financial security but as I've now taken on a mortgage with my benefits as my sole source of income I guess I've made a bit of a noose for myself in terms of giving myself even more to worry about. As things stand just now for me the level of benefit income I get sees me able to have a good cushion of money in the bank which provided me with my mortgage account, last time I checked it there was enough for about 10/11 payments so if I face a similar delay to things through the mandatory reconsideration process I will not fear being thrown out the house.

In someways I am fortunate in that I don't drink very often, my only real vice being that of tobacco and though I have an idea that later in life I will probably regret never having children at the moment this means I do not have the expense that having children brings with it. With my experience of working in the provisions/deli side of things I can still bone and role my own hams and along with the Berkel slicer (12 inch blade) I have at home this means when I have been roasting a ham it can last so much longer and is so much cheaper than buying cooked meats from a supermarket. Last time I checked in my local butcher's place I had 90+ on account as I put away now and then for my buying another bone in leg of gammon. A wee thing I like doing when I have just boned a ham is taking the shank and a rolled joint of ham to an old friend here in the village where I live, the shank allows her to make soup and her wee dog, Harry, gets the boiled shank for a treat. My friend lost part of her right leg, I think it was her right leg, through cancer caused by her, like myself being a smoker.

One thing I am acutely aware of is the difference between the quality of life I have and the sorts of things I do such as visiting Berlin, having my car now paid off and free from the fear of it being taken from me following a bad decision following my move to PiP amongst other things and the nightmare faced by so many who I believe are far more in need of their disability benefits than me. No doubt my situation is going to be changed and things will not be as they are just now for me. How bad they are going to be scares the proverbial out of me.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2017, 09:36:54 PM »
 >bighugs< >bighugs<

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2017, 04:32:03 PM »
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Honestly, at one point I almost got to a stage where I would have been glad to see the bloody DLA-to-PIP transfer letter just to get it over with...

I feel the same way, I just want to know if I am going to have to fight a decision then get on with it.

JLR,

When I was still in the ESA work related group the government announced it was going to be time limited for a year, which  made me feel devastated because the money I get helps pay the mortgage. It was a huge relief to get put into the Support group which has no time limit.

Reading your posts made me think how sick and disabled people often have to live with uncertainty and the poor delivery of welfare benefits by the DWP has added to that, I wish the Government would just admit they got what they wanted and there is no profit to be made in trying to keep take benefits away from sick and disabled people.

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2017, 07:15:24 PM »
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I wish the Government would just admit they got what they wanted and there is no profit to be made in trying to keep take benefits away from sick and disabled people.

There's no profit for the public purse, but plenty for private health insurance companies, which I believe is the ultimate objective.  :-(

neurochick

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2017, 12:53:37 AM »
Just came in from my back garden, ah wis cutting a bit of grass, and found the postie had left the mail on my door mat amongst which were  >yikes< two brown envelopes from Belfast. On a lovely bright sunny day I get these things on my doormat :-(  OK so I compose myself, settle doon wi'a mug of coffee and me obligatory ciggy and begin the process of learning my fate.....my mortgage interest payment payments are being changed was the subject of the first I looked at the other was telling me about the first letter I looked at  and how it would impact my benefit payments :-)   I feel a bit more relaxed noo but just as many who are in the same situation as myself, no' the mortgage thing, waiting for that reassessment or call to transfer to PiP from DLA the wurry/fear the next post could have just that letter is never far from my thoughts, it's like being scared to feel too happy.

I still find myself wondering if things so far as the DLA/PiP transfers go have been put on hold in Scotland till the Scottish government have decided how they are going to run the bits of the DWP that have been moved to Scottish control?

No - nothing is on hold in Scotland as far as the migration from DLA to PIP is concerned.  It is all continuing regardless of any transfer of the administration of PIP to Scotland.  At the moment it looks as though it is merely the administration of the benefit that will fall to the Scottish Government - the primary and secondary legislation that sets out the fundamental provisions and rates is all UK government so it would take a transfer of powers to amend that legislation to the Scottish Parliament before anything could change.  I honestly think its best to assume that nothing will change and plan your finances etc on that basis going forward and then any improvements that do happen in the future will be a bonus.       

JLR2

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2017, 08:26:25 AM »
''No - nothing is on hold in Scotland as far as the migration from DLA to PIP is concerned''

Drat!  I had been sort of hoping a Scottish government might be able to soften these transfers or maybe slow them down till maybe  >erm< the 22nd century.

Just wondering Sunshine, do you get help with your mortgage interest payments as I do with mine?  The way things stand just now for me I am seeing the DWP cover all the interest in my mortgage and this will continue so long as I am on the benefits I am or till either the mortgage is paid off (10yrs) or my condition changes to the point I am able to start looking for work.

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2017, 09:49:48 AM »
NN,
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There's no profit for the public purse, but plenty for private health insurance companies, which I believe is the ultimate objective.  :-(


Good point  >thumbsup<

Neurochick,
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I honestly think its best to assume that nothing will change and plan your finances etc on that basis going forward and then any improvements that do happen in the future will be a bonus.       

Good advice  >thumbsup<

JLR,

No we dont get help with the mortgage. Mr Sunshine works and so our income is too high. We also miss out on free prescriptions and he cant get carer's allowance for helping me. I do feel lucky to have the house because renting privately sounds like a potential nightmare.

AndMac

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2017, 02:41:01 PM »
Having had the brown envelope land, I can honestly say that it wasn't the sickening feeling of dread that I expected. I was more worried about it being alterations to my Disabled Person's Working Tax Credit which would have really screwed me up. I have just started a new job and need this income from DPWTC as the first pay day won't be for over six weeks.
I'm enjoying the job though.
I have photocopied what I can and will send them a diary over a typical day as well as my slips, trips and falls diary. That's going off this week and I will send it to be signed for.
"I might repeat to myself slowly and soothingly, a list of quotations beautiful from minds profound - if I can remember any of the damn things".

Dorothy Parker

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2017, 03:10:22 PM »
Good luck, AndMac. Hope you get the right result.  >x-fingers< >hugs<

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Whit a fright
« Reply #13 on: June 08, 2017, 08:17:24 AM »
AndMac,

I hope it goes well and you get a paper based assessment  that gives you the right results >bighugs<

I hope your new job is going well.

I hope Mr Sunshine's transfer to PIP goes smoothly because  we need the income not just from that but also from the Disabled Person's tax credit.