Ouch Too - a place for and about disabled people.

Forum => Welfare Rights => Topic started by: auntieCtheM on January 12, 2018, 09:10:52 PM

Title: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on January 12, 2018, 09:10:52 PM
The brown PIP envelope arrived today.  They have given me until 2nd February to get in touch with them by phone.  I am thinking that I will leave it until nearer the time 'cos if I lose it I will get an extra couple of weeks DLA money before it stops.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: SunshineMeadows (on Sabbactical) on January 12, 2018, 09:39:30 PM
 >bighugs<

Yes we are wealth creators for the UK what will all the people employed to check on us and the money given to think tanks and what have you to make sure the Goverment and civil service sort us out in the best (for them) manner.

 >bighugs< >bighugs< >bighugs<

I love the thread title  >thumbsup< and the logic in waiting to claim.

Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on January 12, 2018, 10:10:50 PM
It also gives you longer to prepare your application.  Hopefully you won't need lots of time, but it's nice to have it.

Good luck.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on January 12, 2018, 11:19:24 PM
There is a site that helps one with the application - I think that you have to pay for part of it.  Can anyone remember what the site is called please.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on January 12, 2018, 11:43:45 PM
I don't think this site is what you're referring to but it has some info and it's funded by the Law Society so at least they think it's ok.

https://pipinfo.net/#issues


Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: KizzyKazaer on January 13, 2018, 09:13:45 AM
There is a site that helps one with the application - I think that you have to pay for part of it.  Can anyone remember what the site is called please.

You might be thinking of Benefits and Work, which has a subscription fee (though some pages are open to the public for free):  https://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/

(all the best with the dreaded form, by the way  >x-fingers<)
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: lankou on January 13, 2018, 09:27:12 AM
Some information is available free:-

https://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk/personal-independence-payment-pip
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: SunshineMeadows (on Sabbactical) on January 13, 2018, 04:57:45 PM
When the Benefits and Work website was set up they were ahead of the game and now there are a lot more places to get the help that best suits you.

http://ouchtoo.org/index.php?topic=9998.0


https://www.disabilityrightsuk.org/- they have fact sheets which are free and also produce a handbook Disability Rights Handbook - 2017-2018

http://www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/article/2101/Benefits - This section of the website has information about benefits.

http://www.cpag.org.uk/welfare-rights - they have a welfare rights team provides support to those advising on welfare benefits and tax credits:they also have a book Welfare Benefits and Tax Credits Handbook 2017/18

https://www.rethink.org/ - advice on all aspects of mental illness, including factsheets.

https://www.mind.org.uk/  - for better mental health includes guides to support and services

https://www.scope.org.uk - help for disabled people free helpline, 0808 800 3333 email helpline@scope.org.uk .They provide free, independent and impartial information and support, 9am Ė 5pm weekdays.

https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/ Allsorts of advice, including a benefits calculator.

https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/ Fighting UK poverty., also has a benefits calculator
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on January 13, 2018, 07:51:17 PM
I paid for a year's subscription to benefits and work but was too ill to use it. I don't have the concentration to read much and I don't own a computer and can't open documents or pdfs so am often stuffed for fact sheets. I'm currently campaigning for my local authority to put all their info on Web pages and not use attachments so that more people can access and see the info. I haven't got anywhere yet but  shall keep plugging!
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on January 13, 2018, 09:59:21 PM
Thanks for the advice lines.  I have been working out what to say for months when I take the dog for walkies.  But that is not the same as writing it down is it.  I know it is going to sound pathetic, but that is what it is all about.  The more pathetic I sound the better off I will be.  sigh.

When they ask for evidence, does this include notes from people who know me as to what they can see of me when we meet up?  Also how far back can I go with the medical letters?  As far back as when this all started?
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on January 14, 2018, 06:25:45 PM
Hi Auntie

PIP are not really interested in how you were years ago, they want to know what you struggle with now.   When you have been living with limitations for years its often hard trying to explain why you cannot do something.
Its the wording as usual that's the key part.   I am unable to do this task as a result of the injuries sustained x years ago.  I cannot bend, stretch or whatever. 

Good luck for the process
Monic
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on January 15, 2018, 12:56:40 AM
Thank you Monic.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on January 22, 2018, 09:59:22 PM
I've asked someone who has known me for four years to write something for submission.  Is there a protocol?  What I am worried about is if the letter does not exactly say what I need it to say.  Can I ask this lady to take it back to amend it?  Would that not annoy her?
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on January 22, 2018, 10:21:17 PM
Hi Auntie

do you mean you want them to write something for the PIP2 form? 
what is the letter for - there isn't really a bit in the PIP form like the statement on a dla form  >dove<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on January 23, 2018, 01:52:37 AM
As evidence of something that is important in my health.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on January 23, 2018, 09:06:45 AM
I was thinking next time I have a review of either ESA or PIP of giving my GP and care coordinator if I still have one, a copy of the descriptors and the points including how many points are needed for each award and ask them to write an honest letter but saying that the descriptors show what information the assessors need to know. That way I'm hope a general letter would cover everything that affects me and states what I can or cannot do and why. If that helps. So I'm not telling people what to say, I'm saying be honest, but they'd see what needs to be said.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on February 28, 2018, 01:24:23 AM
I phoned DWP on 2nd Feb and the paperwork arrived 27th Feb.

I've been doing my research online finding useful websites.  Now i have to sort out my stuff according to the descriptors.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on February 28, 2018, 11:27:13 AM
I asked half a dozen people for letters, used two with my application, one (not necessary but used to reinforce) for my application for review, and three held in reserve for appeal.  The three held in reserve for appeal were more wordy but a judge would have made finer distinctions than a decision maker with targets to meet to turn people down.

Having said that, you can't foresee everything.

One problem was unexpected assumptions by the decision maker.

E.g. I made a reference in a supporting letter to an exercise class was used by a decision maker as evidence that I don't have falls.  When I applied, I'd told them I didn't expect points on physical mobility but was answering the questions because they asked them, but when I asked for a reconsideration, whilst reminding them that I'd said I didn't expect points for physical mobility, I nevertheless pointed out that you can do exercise classes sitting down.  This particular assumption didn't affect my award, but it took me a while to move from "What a plonker the decision-maker is" to "Maybe they're young and fit and able-bodied and genuinely don't realise there's such a thing as an exercise class where there's an option not to leap around."  In my case, I did usually (though not always) move around rather than using a chair, but I did also stumble and fall sometimes and for all they knew I might have been falling over badly a couple of times in every class (which I wasn't). 

Another problem can be over-eagerness to help

I did tell friends and contacts what I needed evidence of, but some of the letters included other information that was not helpful.  E.g. someone who mentioned my balance but then said it was an ear problem, which it isn't, and I've never said it was, but that made the rest of their evidence seem suspect.  I'd only asked for evidence as to a couple of specific things they could directly observe, not any guesses, conclusions etc.

So my recommendation would be that if at all possible, you ask for more evidence than you need and just use the evidence you think would be most helpful.  You're not the CPS with a duty to disclose to the defence!
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 05, 2018, 06:08:01 PM
I opened my letter from PIP and found it was posted on 17th Feb and due back by 17th March.  So it took 10 days to get here.  If I find I need more time to complete the form then I will use this fact to get an extension.

Got a letter today from an organisation pointing out that I owe them money.  That should be useful for the managing money section.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on March 05, 2018, 09:22:43 PM
Hi Auntie

Phone them on 16th and tell them you haven't been able to complete the form in time or get an appointment to complete it and ask for an extension.  They normally grant 2 weeks extension at that stage, if you ask earlier they tell you no. It always takes 10 - 12 days for the form to arrive and it takes approx. 6 working days to get through their mailing system anyway.

good luck
Monic
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 06, 2018, 12:24:41 AM
That is useful to know.  thanks Monic.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 11, 2018, 07:10:22 PM
I have been reading contradictory advice about getting a letter from the GP.  Some say there is no need to because they will get the information when they want it.  I read elsewhere that now you have to get a letter yourself, (and pay for it if they ask), because the rules have changed and they do not now contact the GP.

What do you think I should do?
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on March 11, 2018, 07:59:00 PM
Hi Auntie

If the DWP think they need additional information they will write to the GP, the facts are that they rarely do this.  If you are refused an award or get an award that is lower than you think it should be THEN you approach the GP for a letter.
I have seen several letters from GP's that totally miss the point of PIP "X is not well enough to work" EH? PIP is not an work related benefit.  Other statements - DWP asks Does the claimant have care needs - GP response "No nursing teams do not provide care in patients home"  Arrrrgh!   A doctors view of care needs is completely different from the DWP's definition of care.

So I wouldn't bother with a GP letter but do let the GP know that your being reassessed for PIP and that he may be contacted.
Monic
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: ally on March 11, 2018, 08:02:44 PM
I didn't send any letters from anyone with my pip form.  Previously, I had asked the consultants, and, hospitals to send all their correspondence to me. As well as my GP.  Therefore, I had a lot of information and details of my health issues , which I scanned, printed off, and included it in my pip application.   My GP practice has the costs of letters, hospital notes etc on the wall of their surgery.  It was £25 alone for a letter.  Therefore, I  saved quite a bit by  doing the above. I did ask for a print off of my meds.  This was free, and, it included why the meds were prescribed.  For example I take amitryptyline for peripheral neuropathy, and nerve pain

From what I can gather,  the dwp did not contact my GP.  Nor did it contact anyone at the pain clinic that I put down as a contact reference.  Therefore, it's entirely up to you whether to ask the GP for a letter or not.  I didn't bother, and, was happy with what I was awarded. However,  maybe I'm one of the luckier ones.  Good luck
 
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on March 11, 2018, 08:05:20 PM
In relation to my claim, I did both.  My GP printed something off his computer and typed a brief phrase into it, and then they phoned him.  Personally, I think they phoned him because my application was so long that they couldn't be bothered to read it, which explains some of their decisions to award points for nonsensical reasons.  (I'm not talking about the points they didn't award.)

Incidentally - I learnt a valuable lesson from this.  I normally don't see my GP about anything I don't think he can fix, which means that if I have new symptoms from a condition I already have but for which there's no nice fix, I don't go and see him.  The result?  There's lots he doesn't know.  And it never occurred to me that the DWP would discount anything that he didn't know about but that I had seen specialists about.  In particular, I didn't get all my referrals from him - optometrists, dentists, audiologists etc. can refer directly, and it's also possible to self-refer to many services.

So whether you get a note from your GP or just wait to see whether the DWP contacts him, please don't do what I did and not make sure the GP was fully briefed.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: ally on March 11, 2018, 09:53:17 PM
There was no point in asking for a letter from my GP, or, tell them in advance I was going to claim pip. I don't know any of my GPS, and vice versa.  All the original GPS left the practice over the last couple of years.  Those who joined the practice don't  stay longer than a few months.  You can't get any appointments with our practice.  We now rely on the walk in centre.  Recently, I've gone there for shingles, and, an Infection in my wound site after my spinal intervention I had over Christmas.  Had I not received the anti viral meds I needed for the shingles, or, the antibiotics for the infection, I could've been pretty Ill.  Luckily, no one rang them for further information.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on March 12, 2018, 03:49:29 PM
That's so sad  :-(
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 17, 2018, 10:18:33 PM
I've been to see a welfare woman and went through my paperwork that I have so far.  She thinks it would be useful if I got a note from the GP as my letters from hospitals etc are rather old.

I have also got an extension til the end  of the month.  Now all I have to do is complete the forms themselves.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on March 18, 2018, 04:52:53 PM
Someone else going through the process. You sound very calm Auntie or are you hiding any anxiety well? By when do your forms have to be returned? I think mine said April 8th but I can't see me gathering the evidence I need in time for that. In one way it feels less isolating to be going through this ordeal with someone else but I'm sorry you have to go through it too. You're sounding very organised. 
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: KizzyKazaer on March 18, 2018, 04:56:05 PM
You certainly do sound 'together' about the whole thing, auntie - but don't forget that if you want a good rant about the whole shebang, you can do it here  >hugs<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 18, 2018, 10:39:10 PM
You don't get to see me when I am having the screaming abdabs!

The welfare woman I saw said that she has a 100% success.  So that is very reassuring.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on March 18, 2018, 10:55:00 PM
 >bighugs<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on March 19, 2018, 09:38:27 AM

The welfare woman I saw said that she has a 100% success.  So that is very reassuring.

Wow I wish I had someone knowledgeable helping me with my forms. I know my CPN says she'll complete them but I don't know if she has any experience of PIP requirements or whether she realises how difficult it is to be awarded enhanced mobility which is what she wants for me.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 22, 2018, 09:42:23 PM
I just asked someone who works in that sort of area and she pointed me in the right direction.

I have started writing on the form itself.  Apart from getting in a bit of a muddle over appendices numbers it is going OK.  It is rather tedious and I find I am procrastinating a bit.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 27, 2018, 12:26:39 AM
I seem to have 30 appendices. 

What a chore this is.  I'm nearly finished.  Just got question 15 to do and go back over the first few again.  Some of the appendices are just one photograph whilst others are continuations of the boxes where you write stuff.  I am trying to be brief.  They can always ask me questions at the f2f.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: neurochick on March 27, 2018, 01:49:42 AM
Its honestly worth the effort.  The more the information you give them now and the better and more detailed the 'picture' you give them now about your daily life and limitations in writing, the less the F2F will actually contribute.  If you can give them all the information in the level of detail they need to understand what your daily life is like, the details of how you are affected, how you actually live day to day and what your medical issues actually are, then the less point there is in the whole F2F process. 

At the F2F after a few niceties, essentially all they do is go through and ask you exactly the same set of questions as are on the form.  They type your answers into an online version of the form as they go along which ultimately is used to generate their 'report'.  I had invested a lot of time and effort in providing a lot of detail about my medical conditions and how they affect me with examples and it meant that the F2F was pretty much a waste of everyone's time.  I had written my answers in exactly the same way as I would describe my situation if I had been asked the questions by someone so the assessor was able to skip over all of them knowing that he didn't need to write much down because everything he needed was in my form already.  The gallop through the questions was really just cursory because he had to do it - the information he was looking for was already there and he knew that.  I don't think he even had to use the F2F to clarify anything I'd provided in my written answers. 

I wrote nothing at all in the boxes on the form - I just ticked the 'tick-boxes' and put my whole written answer to each question in a single appendix, numbering each answer with the relevant question number and question title from the form.  I reckon that my written answers ran to about 6 or 7 pages of printed A4 in a fairly small font.  Its counterproductive to provide far too much information - it makes it impossible for them to find the salient information they really need but if you give too little then you give them nothing to go on and the F2F starts to become much more critical.  Its always easier to get more information down on paper when you have time to think about it, aren't under direct pressure and can keep going back to add or re-word things.  In a face to face situation where you are asked verbal questions its inevitable that you have only a fraction of the time to give your answers, you have to think on the spot and formulate your answers 'there and then', and you don't have the luxury of being able to go back to change, re-word or add things afterwards.   I was also in the very unusual situation of having had a DWP appointed doctor come out to my house to do an assessment for my previous award of DLA and I had had a really good outcome so I specifically asked them to take that DLA claim into account as part of the information they should consider when they were assessing my PIP application.  They also had 4 completed ESA assessments/re-assessments which they clearly used as well.

I'm sure you are doing a great job and it will all be worth it when you are finished.  Don't forget to keep a copy before you send the form off so that you have it to hand to refer to in the F2F and for any future re-assessments.  It makes life 100x easier!!!     
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: ally on March 27, 2018, 10:22:23 AM
Neurochic. I did more or less the same as you did.  The f to f was basically asking questions about the information I'd sent them.  I typed all my answers onto a word document, and, attached that, along with the medical evidence I had,  onto the back of the form.  I knew they would photocopy everything, so, used a large metal detachable clip to hold it all together.  The assessor mentioned how much evidence I'd sent her, and, how long it took to read it all.  The DM also mentioned the medical  evidence I'd sent, and, used that,  to justify why I'd scored the points I did. 

I'd certainly use the above method again with any pip forms I receive in the future.   Good luck Auntie  >x-fingers<

Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on March 27, 2018, 01:08:05 PM
Don't forget that if you give them the info and they ignore it, at least it's a starting point for an appeal.  Obviously you can give more info later, but I can't see what's to be lost by doing your best to give all relevant info.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on March 27, 2018, 05:35:47 PM
I've completed my PIP form and photocopied it and all the evidence I'm sending with it and it's in the envelope ready to post tomorrow. I will probably override the freepost and send it special delivery if I've enough money in my account just so that I know it's there before the long bank holiday weekend. I know it takes days to get to the right department but it's a start arriving there.

Last time I asked for a home assessment and that was ignored. This time I'm saying that I need a home assessment and my CPN put that clearly in her evidence letter too. If they just ignore that and send me an appointment for in the city, can I appeal that?
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: SteveX on March 27, 2018, 08:13:57 PM
Good luck Fiz, fingers crossed for you.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on March 27, 2018, 09:04:44 PM
If you can afford to send it signed-for, at least they can't deny they've got it or when they got it.  I'm as sure as I can be that that's why I got a second reconsideration - it probably took days for my formal written request to reach the top of the stack on someone's computer in-box by which time someone had sent out a reconsideration based on a phone call.  Someone then looked at the dates, noticed they'd signed for my written request and accompanying evidence before they made their decision, thought oh hell, and re-considered their reconsideration.

So in my case, a signature saved me a tribunal.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on March 27, 2018, 09:45:14 PM
You can only appeal a written decision, so if they donít do a home visit and then make a decision on your claim that is not what you want without seeing you,you can appeal that.  You donít get a decision on if they will do a home visit or not.
 >bighugs<
Monic
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on March 28, 2018, 06:36:18 AM
So I can ask for a reconsideration on the grounds that they haven't seen me because I'd requested a home visit but they sent me an appointment for the city ATOS office and I couldn't get there?

Trouble is, I would have to get myself to the tribunal wouldn't I? Doesn't bare thinking about. One step at a time Fiz.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on March 28, 2018, 03:37:01 PM
Hi Fiz wait until you get the letters first please.  You are about 3 steps ahead and you only just posted the form. >bighugs<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on March 28, 2018, 08:12:16 PM
Yup that's me, worrying way ahead of anything that need be worried about!

I've been extremely stressed and barely coping for a few weeks now. My friend/acquaintance had offered me a lift to and from my GP appointment today and when I said I'd ask the pharmacy to deliver my medication the following day she said not to worry as she'd got plenty of time so we could wait for my medication. So I'm sitting in the chemist waiting for my 12 items to be put together and the friend walks in having been to Asda and said she has an appointment at 10am and can't wait so has to go and she left. I've been in so much pain with my back the last few days that the thought of walking home in the pouring rain, get drenched when every step would be agony that I sat there and cried. In front of everyone! I went to the counter to ask them to deliver my meds the following day as I'd be unable to carry them and a lady customer standing there asked where I lived. It turns out she was dropping off one medication order just round the corner from me at a care home she's the manager of. So she dropped me off at my door. She was such a blessing. Despite taking my oral painkillers I honestly doubt I would have made it home.

It's been a tough decision but the friend/acquaintance has let me down many times. She runs late frequently so she'll contact me last minute to say she can't help me as offered and like today, rescinded on a previous offer. I think she forgets she makes offers. When she said last week that it would be no problem waiting for my medication I suspect she had forgotten her 10am appointment and then since then forgotten she'd offered to wait for my medication. I've decided not to ask or accept anymore offers of help from her, even though she's the only person who helps me so I won't see my GP. I just very nearly ended up stuck in town and I wouldn't have had a clue what to do about that.

I've just balled down the phone to my GP who said she's not surprised I cried in the chemist and that many people would have. I've taken her advice and taken diazepam and I've cancelled Friday's plan so I can have 2 days rest. If I spend 2 days in bed my back pain should reduce quite a bit. It's been emotionally exhausting today but at least the PIP form is posted and that is an achievement having really struggled recently.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 29, 2018, 01:19:45 AM
So, I have done a little bit each day.  Tomorrow I have to get the lot in the post due to the Bank holiday.  I have given up for the night.  Doing one copy would have been fine.  They recommend that you do 3 copies, one in the post, one for you to take and one for your files ready for the next stage.  I have decided to make 2 copies - the one I take with me will have to be the file copy too.  Making the extra copy is taking time.

I am nearly there.  It just depends on how tired I am tomorrow / later today.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on March 29, 2018, 06:42:11 AM
You're doing really well Auntie, well done. Is this your first PIP application? What date does your form need to arrive by? The long bank holiday weekend is a hindrance definitely. 
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: ally on March 29, 2018, 05:26:26 PM
Fiz and Aunty.  I can remember how stressed out I was with the pip fiasco.  I developed shingles with the stress.  Take care the both of you.  look after yourselves.  Don't allow it to grind you down.  Easier said than done I know.  When it's all over, and, hopefully you'll both get the award you want, make some ME time, and, treat yourself.  Have some  >chocolate< And  >bighugs< From me X
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 29, 2018, 10:06:11 PM
Oh s-d it!  I did not manage to get the thing in the post today after all.  It should have arrived by 31st March.  Saturday. 

I was just copying the form, which is a complicated process on my machine and I flipped my lid.  I remembered something that I had left out and could not find an easy place to insert it.  I was working to a post office deadline and the stress really got to me and I could not carry on.  So I left it and went to bed with the electric blanket on.  I have just got up again.  Still feeling a bit stressed out.  I will have to hope that they will not mind when they get it after I post it next Tuesday.

Thank you for your good wishes ally.  >hugs<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on March 30, 2018, 09:32:39 AM
 >hugs< Auntie, post it special delivery as soon as you can. Many shops have a Post Office counter that is open all the hours the shop is open. If you send it special delivery today, your receipt will show today's date then on Tuesday phone the DWP to explain the delay and say you posted it special delivery on the 30th. The SPA here has a PO counter and I think there is a find your nearest post office counter online somewhere, probably on the post office website. Take a big breath, and relax then.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 30, 2018, 07:38:27 PM
Fiz, it is Good Friday today.  A bank holiday.  The shops are shut.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on March 30, 2018, 09:41:39 PM
Auntie
Have you already requested an extension?   If yes phone them and tell then that you couldn't access the post due to the Easter Holiday but if you haven't had an extension phone and tell them the same requesting a 2 week extension.  >dove<
Monic
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 30, 2018, 10:26:37 PM
Thanks Monic.  I already have had a 2 week extension.  I will phone them on Tuesday and say that it is in the post.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on March 31, 2018, 07:48:48 AM
Fiz, it is Good Friday today.  A bank holiday.  The shops are shut.

I know it was Good Friday but in my town we have post office counters in two shops. The shop, and therefore the post office counter in MColls is open 364 days a year, only closed on Christmas day and the Spa with a post office counter is open 365 days a year and is open on all bank holidays. The post doesn't get collected on bank holidays but you could have had a postal receipt saying posted on the 30th March and that would help your case, I was suggesting.

 It's useful to know which small shops have post office counters, I've been able to put money into my bank account on Sundays and bank holidays when I've realised I'm overdrawn and raid my purse for coins to try my best to rectify that.

I hope they're okay about the delay when you phone them on Tuesday. Special delivery posted this morning will arrive there Tuesday so that'll help. If you can get to a post office counter, that's usually my problem, finding a lift to get me to the Spa. 
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 31, 2018, 04:05:18 PM
Well, I think it is done.  Hooray.  What a struggle it has been.

Amazingly a letter arrived from my GP this morning that is relevant.  So I have been able to squeeze it in at the end. 
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: KizzyKazaer on March 31, 2018, 04:35:56 PM
They certainly make us sweat and toil for our benefits in one way or another, don't they?!

Now (once it's posted) you have to sit out 'Phase Two' and trust the DWP to make the right decision, so plenty of  >x-fingers< >x-fingers< (and no doubt some restorative  >chocolate< might be welcome and all)
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: SteveX on March 31, 2018, 07:00:40 PM
Well, I think it is done.  Hooray.  What a struggle it has been.

Amazingly a letter arrived from my GP this morning that is relevant.  So I have been able to squeeze it in at the end.

Good!

I wish you the best of luck and hope they come to the right decision and soon!   >hugs<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: auntieCtheM on March 31, 2018, 08:33:59 PM
Thank you Kizzy and Steve. 

A question.  Did you fasten all the appendices together in the envelope.  For example I could make a hole in the top and fasten them together with a treasury tag.  I could also use one of those black vicious clips, but they are rather bulky.  I am worrying that someone in the post room will open the package and all the papers will flutter out onto the floor.  I have numbered the pages so they could be put back together again.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: KizzyKazaer on March 31, 2018, 09:39:26 PM
I can't remember how I sent my attachments  >doh< but I think the treasury tag is a good idea  >thumbsup<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on March 31, 2018, 10:41:40 PM
Just make sure that however you fasten them together,  they can be unfastened without too much of a palaver and without the risk of tearing the paper, because they go through the scanner and you don't want bits missing.

Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: SteveX on April 01, 2018, 11:45:37 AM
I stapled mine inside, yes I know it's old fashioned but I guarantee they didn't lose them ;)

Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Fiz on April 01, 2018, 12:24:18 PM
I didn't fasten my letters of evidence together because I've nothing here to do so. I am slightly worried about that. I have written my National Insurance number at the top of each page though so I just hope it all stays together.

I hope it's not long until I have a date for the consultation, I'm having the hebee jeebies.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on April 01, 2018, 12:51:24 PM
They're scanned in the print room, not sent to the department as papers, so it's not a matter of the fastener keeping them from getting separated in the internal post, and I'd have thought that someone in the post room that drops a page would be as likely to do it as they separate the pages to scan them as when pulling them out of the envelope, so it seems to me that the only real virtue to fastening them together (which I did) is to make sure that no pages get accidentally left in the envelope.

I've suddenly thought - I'm glad I didn't go into total manic meltdown over my PIP paperwork as opposed to a depressive crash, because there's a serious possibility that if I'd thought of it, I'd have sent every single page signed for.  Nothing like being manic.  Let me think now, what does signed-for cost?  £6.50-ish?  Times 100 pages?  Yup, that would be suitably manic craziness, £650-odd spent on postage.  Well, I didn't go manic, but I wonder how many people do go over the top and do absurd things like that.  As it is, if you'd seen the paperwork with all the obsessive headers, footers, headings, sub-headings, numberings etc.  Aargh!
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: KizzyKazaer on April 01, 2018, 04:52:20 PM
And somewhere, an unfortunate DWP decision maker sobs quietly over Sunny's claim...
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on April 01, 2018, 06:22:34 PM
I actually feel quite sorry for a lot of them.  Obviously, there will be some that enjoy being nasty or are judgemental so-and-sos, but my inclination is to suppose that a fair few of them don't like what they're part of but know that if they don't, their jobs are on the line via performance appraisals, and that if they walk out they'll be sanctioned if they apply for UC, and if they're sacked for supposedly not doing their job properly there's also a risk they'll be sanctioned.  But how many other jobs are there out there that they can get?  Parts of the media have gone all-out for years to convince us that civil servants are lazy and incompetent, so that doesn't make them attractive to a lot of employers.

Having said that, I wish that when trying to meet their targets, they'd come up with more plausible reasons for refusing points for things.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on April 01, 2018, 06:44:06 PM
re DWP staff - the dwp is one of the few places that takes on disabled people so you have staff who are visually impaired, have seizures, are on dialysis and have all the types of conditions the rest of us have, yes that should make them more understanding but it also brings out the "well if I can cope why cant you" in people.   I have to pull myself up when someone sits in front of me and tells me they cannot possibly be fit for work as they had one epileptic seizure once a year and no they don't keep a diary and they cant tell me their medication or the type of seizure.  "What do you mean what type of seizure did I have, I had a seizure" - there are 40 different types of seizures and I don't know them all either,   I promise I am not trying to be judgemental but when you have daily seizures its hard to control your tongue.

As for attachments - they will be scanned and as long as your name and NINO are on all of them everything should end up on the dwp assessors screen.

 >bighugs<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on April 01, 2018, 07:28:17 PM
I remember reading an article a couple of years or so back by a GP blogger about how he'd got a picture of Stephen Hawking on his surgery wall to remind patients that if he could work, so could they.  Amongst the comments under the blog, including comments by other doctors who gave their names, were comments to the effect that an awful lot of disabled people can't get the level of support they need to be able to work, and most can't earn enough to pay for the level of support that Hawking got.

There's an issue, for example, that I get very ranty about on a non-disability messageboard I go on where I'd say that those with the biggest mouths and the most posts are typically White UK middle class, degree level education with quite a few posters with masters and doctorates, or solid trades followed by managerial experience.  When someone comes out with comments of the 'surely no one could be that stupid' variety, I often say well, yes, have you looked at an intelligence bell-curve recently?

Likewise I happened to mention to a friend one day that my father had had a very successful career based on no GCSE equivalents at all, just some basic office skills and an entry-level English test.  Ah, but he was very intelligent, she said.  I said yes, but that's not what he built his career on - he was a fantastic decision-maker and had an amazing memory.  But most people with his lack of qualifications wouldn't be able to build a career like his.

You could look at me and say "Well, she looked after her parents, so why can't she work?"  Maybe at some point in the not terribly distant future I'll get back to work, but to be blunt about it, whilst my diagnosable mental illnesses and diagnosable neurological problems and sensory impairments keep the ESA people off my back, the thing that stopped me applying for more paid work was fear.  Yes, I was too much of a coward to put up with the derision of the CMHT both when I applied for work and when I lost it.  Then when I was discharged I was terrified that if I went back to work I might go into total meltdown and find myself back in the 'care' of the CMHT.  It was shortly after discharge that I started looking after my elderly mother, dying of cancer and registrably blind albeit with a little vision, then after my father. 

But in all the work I've done except the Territorial Army, it was like school in that I was bullied and scapegoated and taken advantage of.   A penny dropped a couple of years ago that it doesn't just happen in paid work, it happens in voluntary work.  I tried to work out how many working-year equivalents of my life have been devoted to voluntary work with no testimonial or certificate or even a thank-you card at the end of it. 

So I know that I'm vulnerable in the workplace and sure as hell the mental health services won't ever help with that, or even if they wanted to, I'd never trust them.  I have been emotionally abused by a psychiatrist who turned me from someone who'd picked themself up again over and over and over to someone who gave up, someone who was so frightened of the local CMHT and inpatient unit, they were no longer prepared to take any risks at all.

And whereas I now will tell people that, there are plenty out there that won't say it, or even recognise what their fears are.  They may be frightened of a fit that no one will help them with.  They may be frightened of a fall no one will pick them up from.  They may be frightened of the depression that will stop them coping.  They may be frightened, as I am, of being bullied and taken advantage of.

I've mentioned my falls here.  My distress over people's reactions has far outweighed my other distress.  Repeated physical injuries have been as nothing against people laughing, staring, shouting, insulting, accusing, shoving etc.  But if I said when it was at its worst I was scared to go out and risk falling over,  someone could have thought "But the falls aren't that bad." 

Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on April 01, 2018, 08:14:24 PM
Sunny Clouds
Iím sorry if I upset you. I think I meant to say we are all guilty of making snap judgments based on our own experiences and it takes discipline and compassion to not make decisions that way.

When Iím tired and fed up I might think that if I can do something so can another but itís only if you know the full story you can make informed decisions and I think thatís where Dwp decision makers make mistakes.

Hawking was held up as an example but no one mentioned his carers who enabled him. If all of us had that level of support we would all be able to do everything we wanted to. We know itís never gonna happen especially when there was a report in todayís news saying that there are thousands of disabled children being denied the basic education that is their legal right.

Fiz I think this is the hardest bit waiting for medical and the process. The only section that seems to go quickly is the AA decision makers who can sometimes turn a decision round in 2 weeks. Mind you that tends to be for folk over 76.
 >dove<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on April 01, 2018, 08:55:14 PM
Monic, no, you didn't upset me.  I just started thinking about related things and posted accordingly.

If anyone shows understanding of others and kindness towards others, it's you.

 >dove<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: ally on April 01, 2018, 09:46:46 PM
The department where I worked at the Dwp there were those who had seizures , partially sighted, hearing impaired, diabetics, heart and lung transplant, MS, and many more disabilities.  we were only allowed two weeks sick per year.  It didn't matter why you were on  the sick.  You could have as many sick notes as you wanted.  You would still get a bad sick record for any more than the allocated amount of sick days.  I had two failed spinal operation while working there.  when I returned to work, the first time.  i knew I couldn't have any more sick for at least one year.  The second spinal operation I didn't get paid, due to the four year rule.  My second operation was before the four year period.  After one months sick I had to have  a medical with ATOS.  It was decided I was fit for work.  Therefore, I returned to work before I was well enough. 

My spinal issues worsened.  After steroid injections, nerve root blocks. And, facet ablations,  I was offered a SCS trial  Luckily, voluntary redundancy came up, and I took that.  Had I not, I've no doubt, that after a further four spinal intervention, and, my accident where I had the head of my femur/hip, and elbow fracture I would've been asked to leave.  While working there I had timed breaks.  I was allowed ten minutes to get to the toilet, and, the kitchen for a coffee.  My mobility was so bad at one point, I couldn't do it within the allocated ten minutes. Also, sitting for long periods of time, was aggravating  my spine.  I was then sent for a talk with my line manager about time management.  Not long after that, the staff were moved around into different desks.  Mine was even further away from the toilet and kitchen.  Therefore, working for the DWP was no picnic believe me.  Some of the staff, including myself were in a worse state than some of those on ESA

Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Monic1511 on April 02, 2018, 02:45:52 PM
Ally
you said " Therefore, working for the DWP was no picnic believe me.  Some of the staff, including myself were in a worse state than some of those on ESA"  I have several colleagues who are ex dwp and know that many of the staff are in worse health than some ESA people, it just I find it hard to remain impartial and couldn't do the decision makers job.

 >dove<
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: Sunny Clouds on April 02, 2018, 03:41:11 PM
Quote
I find it hard to remain impartial and couldn't do the decision makers job.

Ditto.

But then I think that overall, vast numbers of jobs that either are civil service in the  broadest sense or the privatised equivalents are horrendous.  The way people are treated is disgusting.

Please forgive me if I do a side rant about the 'jobsworth' stereotype perpetrated by parts of the media.  If you say that, what sort of person do you picture?  Maybe someone working in the DWP or for your local council?

Here's my example.  You put your money in a parking meter and come back a bit late.  The warden gives you a ticket.  They're a 'jobsworth' according to all sorts of media outlets from tabloids to money-saving sites.  So anyway, in your local shopping area, local people bully the warden into giving them an extra five minutes as the norm.  But then someone wants six, seven, eight etc.

If they say no, they're a 'jobsworth'.  Well, actually, their job's probably been privatised, they've got ridiculous difficult-to-meet targets and if they don't meet them, they'll probably lose their job.  Is your 'need' to park an extra five minutes worth their job?

Meanwhile, here's the best bit.  They didn't make the rules anyway.  So what you're asking that 'jobsworth' to do that would put their job on the line for you is to do someone else's job, namely that of your elected councillors.  And if those councillors lose their jobs by not being voted in next time and they sign on, they won't be sanctioned because it will be seen as the vicissitudes of politics.

DWP staff get the same flak.  They're 'jobsworths'.  Well, I hate what's being done to sick, disabled, disadvantaged, jobless, struggling and exploited people by our government, and I take it very personally  because of how it's affected me, but it's more than the DWP employee's job's worth not to meet their targets, so I try not to make too many assumptions about the individuals that make the decisions as opposed to the system.

I still find it expletive difficult.

Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: KizzyKazaer on April 02, 2018, 04:54:00 PM
Definitely it's systems not individuals, in most cases, that deserve the flak - speaking of course as another ex-DWP worker.  Ally, I didn't know (or maybe I'd forgotten!) that you'd been part of 'the Department' as well - reading about your timed breaks and the ridiculous restrictions on visiting the toilet etc, did you work in the dreaded call centre?  I was offered a position in one of those when my benefit processing job was moved some fifty miles away as part of the >rude word< mass centralisation that was taking place back in 200-whatever year it was.  Not being so well at the time, I declined...

Really, I can't see how those sort of 'everything on a timer' environments are suitable for a lot of disabled people anyway - some of us just can't do things as quickly as people who aren't living with particular impairments, so unless 'reasonable adjustments' are made (and doesn't sound like they were for you, in any shape or form >thumbsdown<) then I'd say jobs like that are just not an option.  Personally, I'd rather have my teeth extracted without anaesthetic than work in a call centre!
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: ally on April 02, 2018, 05:59:45 PM
Kizzy,  yes, it was the call centre dealing with benefits.  I did the administration side of things.  Letters, emails etc.  Some of the other administrators worked away from the call centre.  Many of these were hearing, who didn't like answering the phone.  They'd get a GP letter every year stating they couldn't work on the phones due to health reasons.  Of course, I was profoundly deaf, so, couldn't use a phone full stop.  I was classed as part of the call centre, and tied to their rules and regulations.  Hence the ten minutes break for kitchen and toilets.

During staff meetings with an interpreter (I did have that). I would listen in horror at what those on the phones had to put up with.  Some eventually suffered from extreme stress, and, anxiety. Everything was read off a script.  Even if you'd told the claimant everything you could, you still had to ask if there was anything else you could help them with.  If not you were downmarked.  Therefore, Kizzy, i don't blame you for your last remark.  im glad you never worked in a call centre, and for once I was glad I was deaf. 

Monic,  I couldn't do a DM job either.   As sunny has pointed out, If you're working for the Dwp, or, any organisation, you need to abide by the rules, no matter how Unpalatable they are.  The DM, or, any other Dwp employee are only doing the job they're paid for.  Nothing else.
Title: Re: My call-up papers have arrived
Post by: KizzyKazaer on April 02, 2018, 08:57:21 PM
Oh yes, Ally, I remember learning from my existing call-centre colleagues about 'the script'!  Sheesh, what with that and the timed loo visits, the DWP might as well employ robots to do those jobs, because it's no way to treat human beings   >angry<  I wouldn't be surprised if the next big idea by remote managers is to limit consumption of tea/coffee/water so the number of toilet breaks can be slashed, pardon the pun...

Meanwhile, hoping you're recovering OK from the ghastly form-filling, auntie!