Author Topic: Is everything you think you know about depression wrong?  (Read 139 times)

Fiz

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Is everything you think you know about depression wrong?
« on: January 08, 2018, 06:07:17 AM »
A great article and every word of it true in my opinion.

 https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jan/07/is-everything-you-think-you-know-about-depression-wrong-johann-hari-lost-connections?CMP=share_btn_fb

So what should we (government agencies and citizens) be doing about it?

SunshineMeadows

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Re: Is everything you think you know about depression wrong?
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2018, 10:08:26 AM »
I need to come back to this when I am more awake, the amount I read so far is good eg the grief exception.

 >thumbsup<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Is everything you think you know about depression wrong?
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2018, 12:19:50 PM »
We know what governments like ours are doing about it: they are distorting the evidence about work to argue that it's work that's good for you not the nature of the work that's good for you.

Having said that, when it comes to depression, I do think it's complicated, and I'd say there's a whole mix of factors.  I've never been terribly convinced that all that's diagnosed as depression is a single condition/syndrome anyway.  It makes absolutely no sense to me to bung 'retarded depression' and 'agitated depression' into the same group.

The other thing is that I do buy into the notion in relation to conditions like schizophrenia and bipolar that there's evidence of inflammation & the immune system, and I'd be very surprised if that weren't the case in relation to some sorts of depression.  However, since the drug companies are leaping onto this with a vengeance at the thought that they can now market lots of expensive in-patent drugs to us mad'uns, I doubt whether this research will go far without being distorted.

What I think it does all show, though, is something that we actually know, or at least used to know, by common sense.  Picture something for me.  You're 'stressed', 'run down' etc.  (pick your preferred phrase).  Would you be surprised if you went down with a physical lurgy or you got in some way mentally unwell?  That to me says that mind and body are tied in in a way that we know, but in ways that the drug companies only admit if they think they can find pills.

And our recent governments in the UK (New Labour, Coalition, Tory) have been happy to  let our economy drift towards horrible work, with little sense of where to position the UK in the world economy.  Even if they're determined to place us in the cheap role, it can't happen without destroying our economy because they want to keep the means by which they currently get their riches.  So they need to go for up-market economy.  Skilled.  Labour had the theory on educating people but didn't go far with trying to change what sort of products/skills we offer the world.  I.e. get people to do degrees, let them get stuck in call centres and be surprised when call-centre work is outsourced to India.

The other thing I have a problem with in the link is that I think it's missing something overtly that it mentions obliquely.  The author speaks of the man moved from the paddy field and given a cow.  That's not just about working conditions in the abstract, that's about his personal aptitudes and preferences.  I believe that if we focus too much on 'are working conditions ok in this country' and not enough on 'does our economy at every level, including management and education and society value people's individual attributes and use those skills accordingly', some of the lessons here are missed.  Work that's good for people isn't abstract, it's individual.

This could all be good, but only if the government doesn't distort it to back up its blanket 'work is good for you' nonsense with a pathetic token gesture or two towards improving workplace conditions (like just telling employers to be nice and setting up yet another scheme whereby they can use a logo to say they're nice, like the employer I worked for that loved its Investors in People logo almost as much as it liked treating its employers like something to grind under the shoe and then look disgusted at.

Anyway, maybe something can come of this.  You never know your luck.  But what's really needed is a book "How to get really, really rich by making your employees happy" and then we'll have it cracked.



(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: Is everything you think you know about depression wrong?
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2018, 03:11:19 PM »
Love the last sentence there sunny!

I took the giving the man a cow scenario differently to you. I didn't think it meant that's the solution for all. I saw it as assessing an individual's need and meeting it and that will be different for every one of us. I'd hate to have a cow   ;-)

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Is everything you think you know about depression wrong?
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2018, 04:43:36 PM »
I agree with you, I just mean that I think that that aspect of it was underplayed in the overall article.  Maybe the book spends more time on it.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)