Author Topic: Medical Histories  (Read 3164 times)

Prabhakari

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Medical Histories
« on: September 09, 2012, 02:13:28 AM »
Ah yes, memories of going to the dentist with mum.
I have problems with blood clotting, and this was a problem when having teeth removed.

I know, cos I heard mum telling the dental staff.
She told them that I was a little bleeder.




(This is a joke pun, in case anyone did not realise. My mother never uses such language. Nor would I, if it were not an allusion to blood not clotting.)
« Last Edit: September 09, 2012, 12:27:32 PM by Prabhakari »
Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2012, 02:22:42 AM »
I read online a series of horror stories by teachers following a conference,  about reception class children, some of whom turn up in nappies (not disabled, just not toilet trained) and in pushchairs (why be held up by your small children walking?).

One of the stories was heartbreaking.  It concerned a child who turned up at school not knowing his own name.  The teacher tried every way she could think of to find out the child's name to no avail.  After school, the teacher tried to have a word with the parent.

The mother said "Where is the little bu88er?  Come here, you little bu88er!"  Yes, you've guessed, it, she never used his name, just called him little bu88er, so that was all he responded to.

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Prabhakari

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2012, 02:45:22 AM »
I remember that story, Sunny.

Have a bit of chocolate. . . . . After Eight mints. It is always after eight, somewhere in a time zone.
Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2012, 02:53:43 AM »
That's just what I needed.  Have some of my dark chocolate.  Aldi or Lidl?  I'm afraid I don't have any posh choc.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Prabhakari

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2012, 07:25:31 AM »
Are their shops any good? I cannot use them, so do not know what they are like. I do get advertising rubbish for one of them, each week.

Did anyone get severe cramp?
I did, often. It meant that I could not go to school that day. Another reason why I missed so much of my education.
The cramp affected my entire body, and I never knew why it happened.

Peace be on your breakfast this morn.  >wolf<
Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.

Yvette

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2012, 09:55:07 AM »
Sunny, the child not knowing their own name is not just something which happens nowadays.

My parents often laughed about an occasion when we were on holiday - Rhyl.

I had always been taught not to tak to strangers, so when a woman staying at the hotel asked my name, I didn't answer her.  She asked again.  No answer. My parents then said I could answer her, so she then asked what my Mummy called me.  I said, "A nuisance".

My mother was a dreadful parent.   She severely affected my and my sister's lives.

seegee

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2012, 10:20:54 AM »
I know someone who says he used to think his name was "shut up" - probably not completely true, though his parents did spend lots of time & energy caring for the dogs... he has said he felt the dogs were more important than the children.

oldtone27

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2012, 10:21:32 AM »
Having EDS I cut quite easily and consequently bled. I remember as a child rarely a day went by when some part of me was not bandaged. I still bear the scars. Oh and I also had great bruises.

If a child turned up at hospital today with the collection of scars and bruises I had I suspect social services would be there in an instant.

On the parallel topic as a kid I was once asked my name and replied 'dam tart doe'. My mother used to call me 'jam tart Joe' because of my fondness for such confections. There was a cafe we used to visit that did particularly good ones.

Dark_Divinity

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2012, 11:02:38 AM »
Then my name as a child was No Stop it Put It Down.

Occasionally with the addition of For God Sake.

Probably as I got a taste for wielding a paintbrush loaded with white spirit and attacking various delicate items of clothing with it.  >devil<
July 2017- Autism Spectrum Condition.

June 2012 -Hypothyroidism.

Sofie

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2012, 11:09:24 AM »
If a child turned u at hospital today with the collection of scars and bruises I had I suspect social services would be there in an instant.

I was watching a programme a few weeks ago where a child and parent went to A&E and the child had broken his leg and had a skull fracture. Social services got involved; as the mother couldn't explain (ie, it wasn't like he had a fall or something) why he was in A&E so often with broken bones. It turned out the child has Ostegeneis (spelling?) Imperfecta. A.K.A brittle bones.

devine63

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2012, 12:13:55 PM »
Hi

one of the things medical staff are supposed to do before they report a possible case of child abuse is to rule out hidden medical conditions which could account for the injuries seen.   As Sofie said osteogenesis imperfecta is one such condition as the child's bones are brittle.  Other things to be ruled out include haemophilia and blood clotting disorders - which can result in some truely spectacular bruises under the skin resulting from the slightest knock.  There was also a recent case where the child's vitamin D levels had dropped so low she developed rickets and her leg break was a consequence of that ....

And then of course there was the primary school which reported a child to Social Services because of heavy black bruising on her calves ....  that one turned out to be the ink with which mum had written her name inside her wellie boots.....

regards, Deb
regards, Deb

[devine63]

Yvette

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2012, 02:29:30 PM »
Warning. 

The following post contains some very distressing information about violence to a child.  If you are easily upset, please do not read it.  If you choose to read it and become upset, you must accept responsibility for having ignored this warning.


I sat my GCE 'O' Level English Literature in 1971 with two black eyes, one of them closed shut. My lips split top and bottom and grazes all over my face where my father hit me several times back and forth with the back and front of his fist (wearing a large signet ring), after he had come home from my grandparents' pub (Sunday lunchtime session).

My mother stood there and did nothing.  I hate her even more than I hate him. Even now when they are both dead.  And I hope he is rotting in hell if there is a hell.

The exam was two days later and the invigilators (from another school) kept peering at my face every time they walked past my desk.   That exam was the only one I failed.  No wonder.

Even at school the next day in classes, not one teacher asked what had happened to me.  Apart from the stares the previous day, the teaching staff completely ignored my injuries.

The other girls in my class knew though.  The first thing they said was that my father did that to me. It wasn't a question, it was a statement.

I was attacked by my father because on the Sunday, after lunch he asked me what exam I had the next day, on the Monday.  I explained I had a study day at home to revise for the exam which was on Tuesday.  But he thought I was skiving off, even though I begged him to contact the school the next day.

I ran out of the house because I knew he was going to hit me.  He ran after me and ordered me back in the house.  As I went in through the back door, he was standing in the doorway and bashed my head against the door frame as I went in.

I ran up to my bedroom but couldn't get the door shut, not that it would have done any good as there was no lock on it and he would have just kicked it in anyway.

He then stood there and bashed my face from side to side.  With my mother just standing there watching.

My son is almost twenty eight now but if anyone had ever tried to hit my son I would have been between my son and the other person as quick as a flash.  I would have protected my son with my life.

But my mother did nothing.

After my mother's ashes had been buried alongside my father's, I went to the cemetery on my next visit and spat on both their graves. If I had been a man I would have pissed on their graves.  I have not and will never go back to their graves.

My sister, who had very different treatment than me, thinks I am appalling for having spat on their graves.  It sounds very bitter to say, but I am not being bitter, just objective, in that she was never hit because she was our mother's favourite and not only would she have protected her, our mother would have attcked our father for doing so, so he left her alone.

I am sad that my sister judges me because she cannot or will not see that when a child was treated as badly as me, it is quite understandable for them to spit on their parents' graves but she thinks what I did was sacriliege.

I think a man giving a fifteen year old child injuries such as my father gave me was the sacrilege.

Prabhakari

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2012, 03:26:29 PM »
Very sad that you have had to suffer violence, and was not protected.
May it help you to find balance through loving kindness.

With metta, Prabhakari.
Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.

SunshineMeadows (on Sabbactical)

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2012, 05:16:47 PM »
Yvette,

I think the worse thing about domestic violence in the 1970s was even after the open talk of love and peace in the 1960s kids in the 1970s could still go to school battered and bruised and often the teachers did nothing about it. At least things have improved since then.

As to spitting on the graves if it helps you feel better and no one else is being uspet by it eg a passer by then it is up to you to do as you wish.


Sofie

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Re: Medical Histories
« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2012, 05:45:48 PM »
Yvette,

As to spitting on the graves if it helps you feel better and no one else is being uspet by it eg a passer by then it is up to you to do as you wish.

Agreed

Yvette -  >hugs<