Author Topic: Small light at the end of a dark tunnel................If you live in Scotland  (Read 125 times)

Prabhakari

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Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.

JLR2

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I've been wondering if it is this that has seen me not getting a reassessment or move to Universal Credit yet. The nearest thing to a hope for me is the Scottish government announcing that those on indefinite awards will not be called for further reassessments.

Sunny Clouds

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It sounds utterly awful to say it, because it'll fit into a stereotype, but given that I've already considered 'emigrating' to Scotland for a variety of other reasons (including the possibility of Scotland getting independence and remaining in Europe - and this isn't a way of saying that anyone here should agree with my political views on that) this is another temptation.  Not about the benefits so much as about the attitude.

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

JLR2

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Moving to Scotland is perfectly understandable Sunny, I've seen a few comments by others contributing to stories on the Guardian's web pages who are likewise thinking of moving. In some it is because of the devolution of welfare powers in others it is to get away from the government in Westminster.

Where I live in Scotland, a small village near the A9, things are fine but for me the one place I'd not look to move to is Glasgow. I'm from Glasgow and see the place pretty much as a midden. Glasgow might be OK for those who can afford their own home in one or two of the nicer parts but for folk in my situation, disabled and on benefits, it is more likely they'd end up in one of the sprawling housing schemes.

My home in Castlemilk saw me on the ground floor, council housing looking at me as being disabled felt it naturally right to help me avoid stairs. Unfortunately for me this saw me unable to really relax and sleep at night as I feared someone looking to break into the house every night, hearing everything outside my bedroom window. It was just a nightmare. Where I'm living now I can pop down to the shops and not be worrying too much if I've not locked my front door. Even leaving things out in my back garden has never seen any problems. Maybe I've just been lucky >erm<

Sunny Clouds

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With my inheritance, I'm expecting to be in a position to buy a place to live (so long as I don't have any ambitions to move to London!)  I want a bungalow, or if prices are low enough, a pair of bungalows, one to live in, one to rent out for an income.  (Subject to any bank crash between now and when I'm ready to move.)



A friend in a non-London-ish bit of the South of England suggested I move near her, and said there's a really good GP there.  However, she drives and hadn't thought of getting about without a car, and when I started asking how far it was to the nearest pharmacy, hospital, corner shop, supermarket, dentist etc. it became apparent that I'd be terribly reliant on not terribly frequent buses, and I don't trust myself to be reliable about getting back to the bus in time.  It wa a useful mental exercise in what I want. 

The trouble is that whilst I'd planned to spend this last year travelling to various towns and cities round Britain (i.e. mainland), staying a night here and a night there with friends/contacts to get a feel, I've been so tangled up in PIP and probate, and so depressed and stressed, that I haven't done it.

The big thing, though, that would worry me about Scotland is that the Corries are dead, so would there be any other groups worth moving up there to attend the concerts of?

"Scottish Holiday" by the Corries:  https://youtu.be/fESxlF-ujO4
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

JLR2

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Sorry Sunny but I don't know of similar groups to the Corries. I've a couple of their cds but much of my music is spread between, classical, rock in the form of Rainbow, Deep Purple, Iron Maiden, blues by way of Eric Clapton, JJ Cale and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Transport is, as you have pointed out Sunny, really important. Certainly were I without my car things would be different for me. Even though I have a chemist, supermarket and my doctor's surgery near at hand for me to try to visit any of them on foot isn't really an option. We do have a fairly regular bus service to Inverness and I've not personally experienced any problems with it I have been on the bus when others have been unable due to there being folk further on down the bus's route whom have pre-booked their seat. Without my car that situation could see me miss appointments at Raigmore hospital in Inverness.

An aspect of things that crosses my mind as I'm typing this post out is how many folk who talk about people making more use of busses rather than their car is how these folk don't seem to think about how someone either in a wheelchair or on elbow crutches carries shopping, especially if they are trying to do  shopping for the week, folk cannot just make a 40 mile round trip every day to top up their fridge or cupboard can they?
« Last Edit: April 26, 2018, 03:32:16 PM by JLR2 »

Sunny Clouds

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Precisely.  Mind you, I think that logically there'd be a market for a trailer for manual wheelchairs.  Maybe an adapted sholley or something like the home-made go-cart we had when I was a kid using the wheels off an old pram.

Where I live now, I'm on a junction between different neighbourhoods and within about a mile, maybe a mile and a half, I've at least 9 GP surgeries,  6 chemist shops, various grocery shops including supermarkets & corner shops & specialist shops, various eateries & takeaways, 3 post offices, 3 parks, 3 high streets, several banks etc.  The nearest A&E is about 3 miles.  I appreciate that that could be a long way to walk/wheel if less mobile than me, but the last time I got concussion and was discharged in the night, I walked home ok.

It really hit home for me how terribly lucky I am bus-wise when someone said that in their village they have just two return buses a week to their nearest town.

I could manage without a lot of what I've got, and with the way high streets are collapsing and with cutbacks to public services, I suppose a lot of it's a bit academic anyway.  I'm sure I shouldn't be so pessimistic about my future needs either, it's just that like so many people here I've had rough times and fear the worst.

Which brings me full-circle, because little bits of news that suggest that there are at least some people in power with a bit of decency perks me up.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)