Author Topic: Low iron in blood  (Read 583 times)

ally

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Low iron in blood
« on: May 31, 2018, 06:24:52 PM »
Has anyone has a blood test and discovered they have low iron count in blood?  I have to see GP niext week to discuss it.  I've googled, and, omeprazole and oxycodone can cause it.  I'm hoping it's something I can just take supplements for. Thanks X

Fiz

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2018, 07:19:09 AM »
Yes, me, several times. It comes with the territory of eating disorders and also when I'm low I barely eat. I've been prescribed vitamin B12 which helps raise iron levels and I take an A-Z vitamin and mineral tablet daily at the moment so my iron levels have been in the normal range for the last two blood tests. I'm sure you'll be prescribed some iron or vitamin B12 and the GP will probably discuss with you what could be causing it but doctors see people with iron deficiencies each week and almost always, supplements in tablet form will sort it.

ally

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2018, 07:41:53 AM »
Thanks.  I think it's just meds, and, the laxido I've been taking as prescribed by GP.  I've lost my appetite, and, I think the eating problem plus the above has caused it.  The meds cause constipation, the laxido helps, but, I think it's all fighting against each other.  I've felt extremely tired, and, out of sorts for a while.  Hopefully, I'll get sorted on Friday. Thanks

auntieCtheM

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2018, 09:13:00 PM »
That is what medications seem to be like these days.  You take one and it causes a symptom.  So you take something else to sort that symptom out and it gives new side effects.  So you take some other medication to counter those side effects and ....... so on.

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2018, 09:16:18 PM »
Ain't that a fact... Ally, I was also prescribed Laxido because of meds side-effects, and I've found it rather hit-and-miss, to be honest!  Mind you, Dulcolax is somewhat... violent  >yikes<

ally

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2018, 11:13:15 PM »
Thanks.  I saw rheumatologist at hospital this morning.  My blood pressure is high. It's normally ok.  I do get white coat syndrome, as I struggle  with nurses etc.  She waved the interpreter, and my husband away,  and took me into a room by myself. To be weighed, and blood pressure etc.  .  She knew I was deaf, so, why do that?  I felt stressed out trying to work out what she wanted.  I have constant issues with the NHS concerning my deafness.  You'd think it would be the one place where they'd get me.  They don't.  They're one of the worst for having no deaf awareness. The consultant, and nurse seemed unconcerned about my high blood pressure.  I'll see what my GP says next week.

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2018, 09:55:34 AM »
That's ridiculous when you've got an interpreter.

I've only got moderate deafness, and therefore only need a few adjustments, but even so I've got very upset at being left stranded in large, noisy waiting rooms for hours because they don't pass on the message to wave and shout loudly when it's my turn.  Many's the time I've thought that if it's this much of a hassle for me, it must  be a total, utter nightmare if you're profoundly Deaf. 

By contrast, not long ago I went to see a specialist to check out my innards and when someone said 'deaf', he started signing his name.  I explained that I've only got 60dB loss, so mostly two out of three of loud voice, gestures or lipreading work.  (I've given up on my latest NHS hearing aids after wearing aids for over 20 years.)  But I thought how terribly kind.  He signed it slowly, so I think he'd just learnt some very basic BSL, which to me makes it kinder - using BSL not because he needs it for himself, but to make patients feel more at ease.

Have you got a blood pressure monitor you can use at home?  I've got a couple, an arm one and a wrist one.  I don't think the wrist ones are quite as accurate, but probably good enough for general home monitoring.

Anyway, I can't remember BSL for hugs, so you'll have to settle for these
 >bighugs< >bighugs< >bighugs<

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

ally

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2018, 10:57:40 AM »
Where did you buy yours?  I've looked on line, and, found Argos.  I don't want to waste money, so, any recommendations would be good. 

Last year, a nurse at one of my consultations signed to me.  Her mother was deaf, so, she was fluent.  Had the interpreter not arrived, she offered to help.  i always have issues with the NHS.  During my spinal surgery at Christmas, I opted to have  a local instead of general anaesthetic.  They also waved  my husband away.  Then, once in theatre panicked,  as they couldnt communicate with me.  My husband was having lunch by then,  in one of the many cafes.  They offered to postpone it until a later date.  I refused, since I was gowned,  and in the theatre.  I spent two hours trying to understand what they were asking me, and, what was going on.  A complete nightmare.  That's what raises my blood pressure, and, I usually develop rapid heat beats to boot.  Thanks  >bighugs<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2018, 11:58:19 AM »
I just looked.  I'd forgotten I'd kept a Lloyds one as a spare after inheriting my mother's Boots one.  I don't think there's anything between it in terms of how accurate they are, but the Boots one is at a better angle for me to read because I like to rest my arm against my chest rather than on the table.

I'm not sure how to describe it and it isn't the latest model, but basically when you've got it on your wrist with your forearm across your chest and your thumb upwards, you can look straight down at the monitor, i.e. the screen facing upwards when the thumb is upwards. 

If you want to measure your pressure with your arm resting on something, then you want one where the screen is facing upwards when the inside of your wrist is facing upwards, which is what my Lloyds one is like.

In other words, the screen on the first type is at right angles to the screen on the second type.

So subject to what anyone else says, and subject to what reviews you read online, I'd say go for one with the screen facing the direction you want to read it in.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

ally

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2018, 12:29:03 PM »
I'll look at Lloyds and boots online.  I'll take your advice about the angle to do the reading.  thanks  >hugs<

ally

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2018, 09:25:06 AM »
I bought a boots BP monitor.  I also had my blood pressure checked by GP, and, its going down. However,  I have to have a colonoscopy and endoscopy to see why I'm Anaemic.  Apparently, it's standard procedure.  I'm now freaking out.  I've had loads of procedures, and interventions done on my spine, without turning a hair.  However, I knew what was wrong with me. This time I'm going into the unknown and it's more scary.  I know it's best to be in the safe side, but, since I'm a pessimist, I'm already looking on the black side of things. (I'm now laughing,  as the iron tablets mean I'm definitely looking on the black side of things). I've was given ferrous sulphate to take.  That made me ill.  I've now changed to ferrous fumarate.  I seem to tolerate them better.  Has anyone else had the above procedures?  Thanks

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2018, 12:40:59 PM »
I've had both a colonoscopy and an endoscopy.

For the endoscopy, which was about 25 years ago,  they gave me meds to relax me  but unfortunately didn't read the notes and gave me a benzodiazepine.  I get a paradoxical reaction to benzos, so instead of doping me, they put me in headless chicken mode, restless, sleepless, struggling to stay put etc.  Despite that, it went smoothly, so I can imagine that without that reaction it would go even better. 

Quite recently I had a colonoscopy. I had to use an enema at home and the instructions were clear and it was easy to do.  For the procedure, there was some sort of gas I could inhale if I wanted, but I didn't need it.  I thought it might be uncomfortable, maybe even painful, because my internal organs don't lie at quite the right angle, with a very wonky womb, which can give me horrible cramps when food/faeces reach my sigmoid colon towards morning, but I barely felt it.  It was quick and painless.  It was also very much more dignified than I expected. 

Mind you, I had a bit of a bonus with the colonoscopy.  I warned them before I went that I have poor hearing, and the doctor introduced himself both in words and in sign, to see which was more helpful.  I thought that was really lovely.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

ally

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2018, 01:59:08 PM »
Thnks sunny.  If you don't mind me asking, why did you have it done?  I've been stupid, and, read up a lot of stuff on the Internet, which has scared me stupid.  I'm now convinced, I'm not long for this world. I can see why some people become hypochondriacs by surfing the net.  Mine is to see why I have Aneamia.  I have my pre assessment this week at hospital,  to be told about the procedure, and, how to use the enema etc.  It doesn't help that I hate that particular hospital.  I was hospitalised there after my accident. Thanks again X

Frances

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2018, 02:52:34 PM »
Hi
I have had both. I even got to watch it all on a small screen >whistle<, it a bit uncomfortable
The worst bit is the living in the LOO the night before.
 I had diverticlitis. Which after a year or so I got one of my many infections.
That then burst through my bowel into my bladder.
So I spent most of last year in Hossy. Where they removed large part of bowel and Bladder. Now I am doing pretty well.
Much to the surprise of the Consultant.
 >x-fingers< all goes well.
You need to give love to receive it.

ally

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Re: Low iron in blood
« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2018, 04:36:26 PM »
Frances,, I did think of you when posting.  I could remember you having a bad time with your bowel problems.  I'm really glad you're  doing ok now, that's  brilliant.  >hugs<  I know it's necessary to go through this.  I need to be brave. Take care X