Author Topic: It do's not affect disabled people  (Read 167 times)

bulekingfisher

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It do's not affect disabled people
« on: June 13, 2018, 05:24:31 PM »
Hello all ouch readers
                                   
 This afternoon I got a post in my in-box titled ARE YOUR PEIORDS NORMAL ???? + it was fascinating as it told me thing's I would of learnt at school 50 years ago but this road accident put paid to my sex education + disabled people are not supposed to interested in this subject as they have no hope of practicing this activity according to patronising able bodied chauvinist people who are totally ignorant when it comes to understanding/accepting human emotion's as it interferer's with corporate greed + capitalism

Sunny Clouds

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2018, 06:35:43 PM »
Social stereotypes around sex, love, attraction, romance etc. are a problem all round.  If you're noticeably disabled,  'normal' people may think you wouldn't want sex, you wouldn't be capable of sex, or you shouldn't have sex in case whatever's wrong with you can be passed on to any babies you have.  So why would you need to know about 'down there'?   >doh<

The flip side of it is that it's assumed that normal people will want sex, so society can't accept that some people don't.  Those that don't (aces/asexuals) are still in the psychiatric text books as disordered.

Heaven forfend that anyone might not fit into a nice, tidy little box in this respect.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Monic1511

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2018, 07:57:52 PM »
The only comment that came to mind when reading this is
Normal is over rated, and as I said to my boss one day "if you're the definition of normal I'm glad I'm not normal"  he just laughed at me

 >dove<

Sunny Clouds

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2018, 09:05:10 PM »
Monic - I'm going to borrow that phrase.

Incidentally, on normal - I referred on a non-disability site to 'normies' and someone took great offence.   I've never before come across it taken as offensive as opposed to seen as lightly deprecating, often lightheartely so, like 'wobblies' and 'wheelies' and 'fruitcakes'.  I was very much taken aback.  I must find a suitably lighthearted alternative.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

KizzyKazaer

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2018, 09:28:30 PM »
Some non-disabled folk just don't get our humour...

Bule, I had to smile at you receiving an e-mail about periods - I suppose I would have done a bit of a double-take if a message about how to increase penis size had popped into my inbox....

As for sex - what's that?! (mentalist's medication seems to have a libido-killing effect, not that it matters as I don't get out much to meet potential partners anyway!)  But yeah, it's often assumed that visibly disabled people can't possibly perform in that department.  However, everyone still needs to know the basics about their bits and pieces, surely?


Big Muff

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2018, 08:26:10 PM »
Monic - I'm going to borrow that phrase.

Incidentally, on normal - I referred on a non-disability site to 'normies' and someone took great offence.   I've never before come across it taken as offensive as opposed to seen as lightly deprecating, often lightheartely so, like 'wobblies' and 'wheelies' and 'fruitcakes'.  I was very much taken aback.  I must find a suitably lighthearted alternative.
try Walkie Talkies
they love that one honest <insert whistling emoticon>

Sunny Clouds

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2018, 08:56:40 PM »
 >lol<
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

ally

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2018, 10:50:30 PM »
Kizzy,  because of my unique Christian name (inherited  from grandmother, and handed  down thorough generations)   Those who've never met me, presume  I'm a man.  Since joining Facebook, I've been inundated  with emails for viagra,  women wanting to meet me, and, what they'd like to do to me (physically impossible).  I get fed up deleting them all. 

KizzyKazaer

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2018, 09:30:24 PM »
Quote
... what they'd like to do to me (physically impossible).

Ooh, now you've got me really curious!!  Though I won't ask you to say as this is a family-friendly forum  ;-)

auntieCtheM

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2018, 12:43:04 AM »
It is not just you ally.  I am inundated too, and I expect everyone is.  They just do not discriminate.  They buy up lists of email address and just use them all.

ally

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2018, 09:39:51 AM »
Auntie, im glad I'm not the only one.  I did wonder if Facebook was to blame. Some of them were pretty graphic.  The language wasn't pretty either.  Then, I received the usual scamming and phishing emails.  My iTunes account had been hacked etc.  Since I'm profoundly deaf, I'm unlikely to use iTunes.  At one point, I received emails from someone  on my email address book.  Apparently, she'd been kidnapped by carribean pirates, and, wanted me to send the ransom  money to her urgently.  it makes you wonder who these  people are?  I couldn't be bothered thinking up ways to scam people out of their cash.  I wonder if anyone would fall for the pirate scam?  I thought that was ridiculous.  Desperate. Springs to mind

Sunny Clouds

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2018, 10:36:05 AM »
Sadly, some people do fall for the scams.  Take ones like the pirate - let's suppose their computerised spamming system sends this out to 10 million email addresses.  Let's suppose that 4 million of those are private email addresses.  Let's suppose that 400 people know someone this could plausibly apply to, i.e. they're on an overseas holiday/trek/work in the region concerned.  Let's suppose that 50 fall for it.  That's brought money in.

Surely it's not worth it, you say.  But here's the thing - it's not just one email, one scam, it's lots.  They have lots of variations.   So one person falls for one scam and another person falls for another.  I suspect the pirate one may be too clumsy, but there are similar ones involving people supposedly overseas and having been robbed and left stranded. 

I've seen interviews with the sort of people you'd think wouldn't fall for scams and who wouldn't have thought they would but who have the courage to say publicly  "I fell for it, so could you."  We're talking intelligent, educated, professional and managerial people including retired or recently retired people. 

Incidentally, don't forget that people with email addresses can be people with conditions like early dementia or temporary confusion from illness or injury.

I hate these scams with a vengeance.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Fiz

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Re: It do's not affect disabled people
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2018, 07:47:23 AM »
So do I.

I think it's frightening that scammers can hack into someone's email account and read emails to and from that person and scam that person accordingly. Recently a woman was buying a house and early on completion date she received an email from "her solicitors" asking her to transfer the balance of the house purchase into a bank account which the named providing the sort code and bank account number. She transfered 320,000 and only after lunch when her solicitor phoned her asking why she hadn't transfered the money into the solicitor's bank account details of which were on the written letters received from the solicitors did she realise she'd been scammed. The police contacted the bank that had the account the money had been paid into but the scammer had already removed the money. The lady's own bank is refusing to compensate saying they had done absolutely nothing wrong and the she herself made the transfer and therefore authorised the transaction. That was a hell of a lot of money to lose.