Author Topic: Should I be worried  (Read 608 times)

JLR2

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Re: Should I be worried
« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2018, 06:43:07 AM »
''Jlr2 are you going for longer than 4 weeks? I'm wondering why they said I was fine going without notifying them as it's less than 4 weeks but they've sent you a form?''

It is safer to notify in order not to miss any reassessment requirement or other DWP appointment(s) arranged by them whilst you are out of the country.

Fiz, I never leave the country for more than 28 days at any one time, the way I've read and understood the BF5 form is that so long as you have not lived in any other country for the immediately prior 3 months you are allowed 28 days, inclusive of the leaving and return dates.

I'm sure I mentioned maybe a few years back on another thread of there being a  >erm< statute of law (?) in the UK known as the 'Habitual  residency test' under which any UK citizen living outside of the UK for 3 months or more automatically lose their citizenship entitlements and are barred from claiming any welfare benefits or access to free care through the NHS.

If someone leaves the country for say 2 months and then returns for less than 3 months before leaving again for one and a half months the UK's government departments including the DWP will total both periods of absence giving a total of 3.5 months absence and stopping access to all benefit entitlements for the person concerned. The person affected will then have to remain living in the UK for 3 months before s/he can apply for access to the UK benefits system. It is for this reason I have always done all I can to make sure I have 3 months between any absence I have from the UK.

Having said what I have there is still a fair bit of misunderstanding possible as the government's definition of 3 months could refer to whole months or 12 weeks, I have worked on the basis of 12 weeks and to date I have not been found to have contravened the 3 month criteria, even when the DWP carried out a cumulative impact assessment of some previous absences. All of which doesn't see me any less nervous of every day's post as I'm half expecting the DWP to say something.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2018, 08:43:05 AM by JLR2 »

Fiz

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Re: Should I be worried
« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2018, 10:02:50 AM »
I can understand that fear. I'm already worried because my call handler told me I needn't let them know about a holiday of a week as the limit for holidays is 28 days. But I have my call log and length of call logged so I can prove I did phone. I will miss 5 postal days in the time I'm away so I'm very unlikely to miss an appointment for reassessment in that time. I think they have to give you some notice.

I emailed the airline yesterday requesting assistance at the airports as I can't stand/queue without pain and with boarding I can't walk as fast as others so I request I board first before all the others come through the gate and leave the plane last so I'm not hurried or jolted which is extremely painful and I've received a full email back saying that if I go straight to the passenger assistance desk on arrival there will be a wheelchair and I'll be accompanied through check in and be escorted to the rear steps of the plane before the other passengers. I think the passengers normally enter the plane at the front so I assume I'm being taken to the back as there are less steps that end. I'll be met by passenger assistance on the tarmac at the destination airport and accompanied through the airport to the transport. Similar the return journey. If all that happens I will be seriously impressed. I may feel like a lemon in a wheelchair when I can walk, not that I know what a lemon feels like, but I do feel reassured that I won't be stuck standing and queueing and the pain getting more and more unbearable. I feel far more likely to reach the campsite without pain. But we'll see if it comes to fruition first I guess.

JLR2

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Re: Should I be worried
« Reply #17 on: June 20, 2018, 05:18:57 PM »
Fiz, if I might offer some advice borne out of my experience flying with Easyjet. I Contacted Easyjet sometime back now and explained to them that I cannot manage stairs/steps and in support of my situation I provided (via email) a letter from my GP which I always have in my pocket when travelling. The result of my doing this was that I was given without charge a seat with extra leg room (which also entitled me to take an extra bag as hand luggage)  I also have had on many flights access to the airport's ''Ambulift'' services. The ambulift service is where at the airport you are taken in the airport wheelchair to the aircraft, usually ahead of other boarders, where you are rolled onto an adapted truck/lorry which has a lift fitted.

This lift equipped lorry then takes you to the side of the aircraft before lifting you up to the entry door on the opposite side of the front passenger stairway and from there you are then rolled onto the aircraft. Another wee benefit of sorts is that with the airport help for disabled passengers you are also fast tracked through security. On arrival at the destination airport you wait till all other passengers have left the aircraft and then are either met by the destination airport's ambulift service or just as at the departing airport where this service might not be available you are manually carried in the wheelchair up/down the stairs of the aircraft. 9 times out of 10 I have found myself at the passport control section of airports ahead of the other passengers on my flights as the disabled passengers helpers see to getting those they are looking after to passport control as quickly as they can. At Glasgow airport and Schoenefeld in Berlin those helping me have looked after me from arrival at the airport to the bus I use to get into the city.

Sorry if my posting has been a bit long Fiz, if there is anything more you would like me to explain of my experiences when flying please do  give me a wee shout :-)

Oh and I might mention regards being carried onto the aircraft, I always feel sorry for the poor lads who carry me up the stairs as apart from me feeling like I weigh a ton (about 14 stone)  with all the gear I carry when travelling in my Army surplus combat jacket (awe the big pockets are very useful)  I'm sure the guys feel it. That said those who have helped me have never been other than brilliant with never a hint of complaint from them.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2018, 05:50:04 PM by JLR2 »