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Government announces end to unnecessary PIP reviews for most severe health condi

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Monic1511:
Now don't get too excited as the devil will be in the detail but this has appeared on rightsnet
Government announces end to unnecessary PIP reviews for most severe health conditions


People with severe or progressive conditions will receive ongoing awards with a 'light touch' review every ten years
The government has announced an end to unnecessary reviews of personal independence payment (PIP) for those with the most severe health conditions.
With new guidance to come into effect this summer, the DWP says that people who are awarded the highest level of support under PIP - and who have severe or progressive conditions where their needs are expected to stay the same or increase - will receive an ongoing award of PIP with a 'light touch' review every ten years.
Commenting on the proposed change, Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work Sarah Newton said - We’re absolutely determined to ensure people get the right support that they need to live better, more comfortable lives.
PIP is a needs-based benefit that takes into consideration people’s individual, and sometimes quite complicated circumstances.
We’ve listened to feedback from organisations and the public, and this common-sense change will ensure that the right protections are in place while minimising any unnecessary stress or bureaucracy.'
NB - the government adds that it will work with stakeholders to design the light touch review process so that 'it adds value for both our claimants and the department'.
For more information see Government to end unnecessary PIP reviews for people with most severe health conditions from gov.uk

KizzyKazaer:
Oh, wouldn't this be just wonderful - if the Government's definition of 'most severe'/'progressive' isn't so narrow as to exclude the majority!  The gov.uk site seems to be displaying just a press release at the moment with more to be finalised over the summer, so watch this space...

Fiz:
I told my friend with the brain damaged husband this because their tribunal was 17 months after his DLA to PIP transfer which awarded him nothing which then removed her carers allowance, reduced their housing benefit and basically their 17 month wait was sheer hell leaving them with a mountain of debt. She said her husband now has a ten year award by which time he'll be in his 70's so she's hoping assessments are now a thing of the past. His condition will never improve even a tiny iota. To be put through all that is awful. So I really hope this happens for people like them.

SteveX:

--- Quote from: Fiz on June 24, 2018, 07:15:07 AM ---I told my friend with the brain damaged husband this because their tribunal was 17 months after his DLA to PIP transfer which awarded him nothing which then removed her carers allowance, reduced their housing benefit and basically their 17 month wait was sheer hell leaving them with a mountain of debt. She said her husband now has a ten year award by which time he'll be in his 70's so she's hoping assessments are now a thing of the past. His condition will never improve even a tiny iota. To be put through all that is awful. So I really hope this happens for people like them.

--- End quote ---

Yes, so do I.

neurochick:
Interestingly when I had to apply for PIP last year (I had an indefinite DLA award so was being migrated over) I was awarded the enhanced rate for both care and mobility. My PIP award letter said that my award would not be reviewed for at least 10 years.  I have conditions that aren't expected to improve and I guess that the enhanced rate awards would suggest that my the effects of my disability are pretty severe. Perhaps this new 'policy' is the progression and 'semi-formalisation' of something that has to some extent been going on in practice.  It certainly seems sensible (if it actually happens and subject to how they actually implement it)

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