Author Topic: Government announces end to unnecessary PIP reviews for most severe health condi  (Read 758 times)

Monic1511

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Now don't get too excited as the devil will be in the detail but this has appeared on rightsnet
Government announces end to unnecessary PIP reviews for most severe health conditions


People with severe or progressive conditions will receive ongoing awards with a 'light touch' review every ten years
The government has announced an end to unnecessary reviews of personal independence payment (PIP) for those with the most severe health conditions.
With new guidance to come into effect this summer, the DWP says that people who are awarded the highest level of support under PIP - and who have severe or progressive conditions where their needs are expected to stay the same or increase - will receive an ongoing award of PIP with a 'light touch' review every ten years.
Commenting on the proposed change, Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work Sarah Newton said - We’re absolutely determined to ensure people get the right support that they need to live better, more comfortable lives.
PIP is a needs-based benefit that takes into consideration people’s individual, and sometimes quite complicated circumstances.
We’ve listened to feedback from organisations and the public, and this common-sense change will ensure that the right protections are in place while minimising any unnecessary stress or bureaucracy.'
NB - the government adds that it will work with stakeholders to design the light touch review process so that 'it adds value for both our claimants and the department'.
For more information see Government to end unnecessary PIP reviews for people with most severe health conditions from gov.uk

KizzyKazaer

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Oh, wouldn't this be just wonderful - if the Government's definition of 'most severe'/'progressive' isn't so narrow as to exclude the majority!  The gov.uk site seems to be displaying just a press release at the moment with more to be finalised over the summer, so watch this space...

Fiz

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I told my friend with the brain damaged husband this because their tribunal was 17 months after his DLA to PIP transfer which awarded him nothing which then removed her carers allowance, reduced their housing benefit and basically their 17 month wait was sheer hell leaving them with a mountain of debt. She said her husband now has a ten year award by which time he'll be in his 70's so she's hoping assessments are now a thing of the past. His condition will never improve even a tiny iota. To be put through all that is awful. So I really hope this happens for people like them.

SteveX

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I told my friend with the brain damaged husband this because their tribunal was 17 months after his DLA to PIP transfer which awarded him nothing which then removed her carers allowance, reduced their housing benefit and basically their 17 month wait was sheer hell leaving them with a mountain of debt. She said her husband now has a ten year award by which time he'll be in his 70's so she's hoping assessments are now a thing of the past. His condition will never improve even a tiny iota. To be put through all that is awful. So I really hope this happens for people like them.

Yes, so do I.
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neurochick

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Interestingly when I had to apply for PIP last year (I had an indefinite DLA award so was being migrated over) I was awarded the enhanced rate for both care and mobility. My PIP award letter said that my award would not be reviewed for at least 10 years.  I have conditions that aren't expected to improve and I guess that the enhanced rate awards would suggest that my the effects of my disability are pretty severe. Perhaps this new 'policy' is the progression and 'semi-formalisation' of something that has to some extent been going on in practice.  It certainly seems sensible (if it actually happens and subject to how they actually implement it)

Fiz

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I think 10 year awards have been around since the start of PIP and that appears to be the PIP replacement for an indefinite DLA award. I think what this new information is saying is that even the 10 year awards won't necessarily be reassessed again, they may have a brief for to complete to reaffirm nothing has changed and that's it.

Considering one of the stated main reasons for ending incapacity benefit was to end the indefinite awards that saw people with a health condition "put on the scrap heap" ie they're costing us too much money so we must stop this happening, this is a decision making PIP much more like incapacity benefit used to be so acknowledging that people have health conditions that are highly unlikely to improve and the government have realised that reassessing such people is costing the country money that is needlessly being spent. So the government have spent a fortune changing the disability benefit system only to realise that the old system made wise decisions not reassessing people unecessarily. Daft!

Good to see you neurochick  >star<

KizzyKazaer

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Hmmm, not sure that a 10-year PIP award equates to a DLA indefinite.... I originally received DLA higher rate care indefinitely (since 2007), but my enhanced rate daily living component of PIP is for 3 years.  Perhaps because I never got anything for PIP mobility - having 'only' psychological issues with planning and undertaking a journey etc (which under DLA rules got me lower rate mobility indefinitely!)  - this apparent '10 year rule' doesn't apply.  Or maybe the DWP have just been making it up as they go along  >whistle<

Fiz

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Yes sorry, I didn't explain myself well. When I equated the DLA indefinite to the PIP 10 year award I was meaning they are both the best outcome in the respective benefits that anyone can get so they seem to both be the maximum awards available. So someone with a disability or condition that will either never improve or can only get worse used to be awarded DLA indefinite whereas with PIP their maximum award seems to be 10 years. What this new decision means is that the PIP 10 year awarders may now not be fully assessed again unlike people with lower awards. Instead they may just get a form where they can either state any changes to their condition and ability or state that nothing has changed and then they'll receive a new award with no further assessment. I hope that makes more sense now I don't think I worded it well before.

KizzyKazaer

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 >tah< Fiz, that makes perfect sense  >thumbsup<  though it might just have been me being a bit thick, the heat addling my brain more than it already is  ;-)

Ten years is definitely better than three, but was expecting to get nowt, so must be thankful for what I have... and who knows what will change between now and 2020  >x-fingers<