Author Topic: Growing Children on TV  (Read 3149 times)

oldtone27

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Growing Children on TV
« on: August 13, 2012, 04:10:41 PM »
There is a new series starting on BBC4 tonight at 9 pm called Growing Children about three disorders and their effect on a child's development. Tonight's program is about Autism.

The following is a link http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01lyczl

Monic1511

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2012, 09:03:27 PM »
Bumping this


Episode 1 of 3

Duration: 1 hour

Autism is a complicated and often misunderstood condition. In this film, child psychologist Laverne Antrobus goes on a quest to discover the different way that the brain works in children with autism and to explore the latest scientific research.

Laverne meets Tony, a severely autistic teenager who requires full-time care from his family, and learns some of the difficult sensory problems that children with autism can have. The autistic brain cannot always process light and sound in the correct way, leading to an overwhelming and exhausting overload of noise and colour. Laverne travels to the University of Cardiff to investigate new research into the link between sensory issues and the autistic brain. She also goes to the University of Nottingham to try and uncover why people like Tony appear to be so socially isolated. She begins to learn the amazing way our brains work when confronted with social situations and how we understand the social cues that we encounter every day - and what happens when this goes wrong.

With a better understanding of Tony's difficulties, Laverne then continues to follow his story as this family go through the difficult and highly emotional transition of putting their son into full-time residential care.

Laverne also meets a family with two young boys, Jake and Zaine. Jake has been diagnosed with high functioning autism - the opposite end of the spectrum to Tony. By spending time with Jake, Laverne sees some of the social difficulties associated with the condition, such as the daily struggle with school and making friends. Jake's younger brother Zaine is also beginning to show autistic traits and in a particularly poignant sequence Laverne attends a diagnosis session with the family. With amazing access to this emotional day, Laverne explores the complicated process of diagnosis and the symptoms that are looked for in order to reach the correct conclusion. Laverne also investigates some exciting and pioneering research being carried out at Birkbeck Babylab, which is offering hope for a simpler and earlier diagnostic procedure.

Michael is a 19-year-old with high functioning autism who is studying physics at the University of Surrey. By meeting Michael we see that an autistic brain can actually learn to deal with mainstream society. How does he comprehend society and what coping systems does he have in place? Laverne carries out a experiment where she takes Michael to view one of her favourite paintings. The different way in which they view the portrait offers a powerful insight into the way someone on the spectrum can think and interact. Laverne also compares how someone with autism deals with idioms and metaphors to those who are not on the spectrum. We come to understand that someone with autism just sees the world in a very different way.

These powerful stories are intermingled with interviews with leading scientists in the field that help to further illuminate this condition.

Our brains are constantly monitoring the social situations we find ourselves in - attempting to mindread the people around us and helping us to respond appropriately. For those on the autistic spectrum this is often not the case. Autism is still an incredibly puzzling disorder of the brain, but over the last 50 years we have started to unlock the meaning of some of its more bizarre behaviours and symptoms. We are now beginning to understand what happens in the brain as we process all the sensory information from the world around us, and to comprehend how it affects the way children think, act and grow into social beings. In this film we learn along with Laverne and we begin to understand the different way in which the brain of someone on the autistic spectrum operates - as well as the heart-wrenching effect this can have on them and their families.

devine63

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2012, 10:30:16 PM »
I saw the second half, it seemed to be covering the topic pretty well.
regards, Deb

Sofie

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2012, 10:35:19 PM »
Why does there never seem to be programmes about Autistic adults? It always seems to be about children...

devine63

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2012, 11:14:03 PM »
Good idea Sofie,

why don't you contact that journalist Kate who joined us a few weeks ago and see if she might be interested in the idea?
regards, Deb


Sofie

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2012, 02:19:25 PM »
Will do, thanks. A friend did mention something about it last night. Well, it was more "why can't they do a documentary about me" than adults in general.

oldtone27

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2012, 02:35:38 PM »
I take Sofie's point about the concentration on children but the program did look briefly at a young man at university who was high functioning (I think the term is).

Perhaps it is likelihood that people most often come across autistic children cause the programme makers to think it will be relevant to a larger viewership.

Sofie

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2012, 02:40:19 PM »
I know which one you're talking about and I believe he is higher functioning. (not Aspergers)

I liked the idea of them showing a parent with a child going through the assessment.

I felt really sorry for the lady with the 15 year old.

oldtone27

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2012, 02:51:31 PM »
The university lad seemed quite 'normal' (well perhaps pretty bright) but his main difficulties were with social situations and understanding feelings. He was fine with technical exams but had trouble with English papers although he was perfectly articulate.

One thing that I could empathise with was that in one exam he was asked to write about the humour in a piece of text. He said he didn't find it humorous. He was marked down but in fact I thought that was a perfectly valid observation if he did not find it funny. Humour is very subjective and who is to say he was wrong? The Examiners, I suppose, but they clearly weren't making proper allowance for other opinions.

Defying Gravity

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2012, 06:14:26 PM »
I saw it and found it interesting. Especially the research that had found some babies who were at a higher risk of developing autism (because they had autistic siblings) didn't habituate/get used to repetitive noises but instead were alert all the time. That must be very tiring.

About the university student, I also felt sorry for him and his GCSE English exam. I guess the point though was that the examiners would expect someone who is quite bright to realise that they had to write an essay even if they didn't find it funny, and to be able to comment on why the humour didn't work. He was clearly very intelligent but couldn't do that. A good argument against exams!

devine63

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2012, 07:16:55 PM »
Hi

I have worked with many students with autism spectrum disorders during my career as a Disability Advisor in Higher Education.  The vast majority do very well - the University environment eventually suits them very well in lots of ways.  However the transition from home / FE College to University can be stressful and difficult and there is much one can do to help - if the student contacts the University Disability Service before starting the course.  They are entitled to the Disabled Students' Allowances and that means we can make use of a buddy to help in the difficult first few weeks and a mentor to help the student to manage their workload and have someone to talk to about any social issues....    The language problems do sometimes make  things difficult - e.g. misunderstanding instructions and taking literally comments which were intended as metaphorical, not getting jokes & sarcasm...

But overall, as I say, the vast majority of students did very well, many completed their degrees and went on to take higher degrees too...
regards, Deb

Prabhakari

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2012, 01:32:07 PM »
I just wondered how one balances children on top of modern television sets. They are rather thin, compared to the old sets with tubes.

                                                                ;-)
Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.

Hurtyback

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2012, 01:43:38 PM »
I just wondered how one balances children on top of modern television sets. They are rather thin, compared to the old sets with tubes.

                                                                ;-)

>groans<

oldtone27

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2012, 01:50:31 PM »
Quote
I just wondered how one balances children on top of modern television sets. They are rather thin, compared to the old sets with tubes.

You drape them over like towels. If they've been good they can face the screen otherwise the back.  >whistle<

Monic1511

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Re: Growing Children on TV
« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2012, 08:19:39 PM »
Quote
I just wondered how one balances children on top of modern television sets. They are rather thin, compared to the old sets with tubes.

You drape them over like towels. If they've been good they can face the screen otherwise the back.  >whistle<
>lol< >lol< >lol< >thumbsup<