Author Topic: Ch4 Says Type II Diabetes Costs the NHS One Million Pounds An Hour  (Read 2873 times)

Yvette

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The Ch4 tv programme this evening stated in "Extreme Diet Ward: A Food Hospital Special that Type II Diabetes costs the NHS one million pounds an hour in drugs and care. 

And that one in twenty women have Type II diabetes.

That information really shocked me.

Link:   Click Here


http://digiguide.tv/pick-of-the-day/31+July+2013/documentary-extreme-diet-ward-a-food-hospital-special/

« Last Edit: 31 Jul 2013 11:00PM by Yvette »

devine63

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Hi Yvette

I am pretty sure that claim is rubbish - I have asked www.fullfact.org  to take a look at it, as the "1 Million per hour" is bound to make it into other media sources.

regards, Deb

DarthVector

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1M per hour is 24M per day, or 8.76bn per year. I've just seen a BBC article quoting Diabetes UK chief executive Barbara Young as saying that:

"Diabetes costs the NHS around 10bn annually and 80% of this spend goes on treating complications."

I'd put more trust in the diabetes charity to get the numbers right than the media, but in this case, they're both in the same ballpark.

Yvette

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Thanks for your article link Darth. 

Barbara Young, Diabetes UK Chief Executive says:

Quote
"Diabetes costs the NHS around 10bn annually and 80% of this spend goes on treating complications."

The figure she gave is higher than the Ch4 figure by 1.24 billion pounds!

Diabetes UK says that 80% of the ten billion pounds a year goes on treating complications, which bears out what Ch4 said about the money is spent on drugs and care.

So Ch4 was right - even though it did underestimate the actual figure of ten billion pounds a year - to pay for the drugs and care of people with diabetes.

No wonder it is being said that diabetes is now an epidemic with so many developing the disease.

It worries me as people who are overweight are more likely to develop Type II diabetes and I am overweight.

I have tried diets (sensible diets such as Weight Watchers) and lost weight but I just end up putting on more back on.   >crying<

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Yvette >bighugs<

myrtlemaid

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  • Still fighting...well sometimes !
It is tough to loose weight particularly when you are the most mobile of people..kits eve hardr to keep it off in the same circumstance as you were in before..It seems to run on my fathers side of the family as does moderate overweightness..

Im concerned ill inherit it BUT Ive seen dad handle it so well that I think my fear is less than t otherwis be  and i guess I can see there is a good life after diagnosis for most diabetics. The key for my dad has been gettinbg to know all he can about it including new info diaebties UK put out and trying, ( after consideration), to put the b est ideas for you into your life.

You do have to take care to eat regularly and interestingly, ac cording to my GPthe diet diabetics should try to follow is one thats healthy for anyone'

I try not to worry too much about it because im prone to get obsessive and did spend lots of time acouple of yrs ago constantly looking for signs and missed out on just living..

Like most things its all a matter of balance.. yes try to keep weight down BUT also allow yourself unhealthy treats from time to time so you enjoy the life you have now !
  >biggrin< >dove<

My mindfullness/DBT therapists would be proud of me.






If you have a true and loyal friend you indeed have a goodly share of lifes riches

Yvette

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Quote
My mindfullness/DBT therapists would be proud of me.

You should be proud of you too. I am proud of you too and all of Ouch will be.    >magicfairy<


seegee

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Quote
My mindfullness/DBT therapists would be proud of me.

You should be proud of you too. I am proud of you too and all of Ouch will be.    >magicfairy<

>thumbsup< >biggrin<

Dic Penderyn

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I too am proud of you  >applause<  >rainbow<
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Well done, Myrtlemaid.  >hugs< >star< >hugs<

devine63

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Well done Myrtlemaid.

Yvette I'm not convinced about this claim about the expenditure: just a few questions occur to me:

how much of the expenditure is on the complications of Type I (insulin dependent) diabetes?

the costs of which "complications" have been included?   Did they also include all of the times when attempts to treat the complications went wrong?  e.g. drugs that made things worse or just did not work; post op infections? times when the surgeon amputated the wrong limb?  other things which are not actually complications of the diabetes.  Does all the bad advice untrained GPs give their patients about how to lose weight count as a treatment / complication?  [e.g. at least 2 have told me I should increase my carbohydrate intake!!!]

what counts as a complication of diabetes? - I have the full blown metabolic disorder (i.e. diabetes type II, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia, etc.)  but at least two of those developed before the diabetes and therefore cannot be counted as complications of it!   But I bet treatment of all those things has just been counted with the "complications". ...   

re developing diabetes: if you are sensible about your health you can defer getting diabetes as along as possible - doctors just assume I am lying when I tell them that I managed to stop hyperinsulinemia (insulin resistance) from developing into type II diabetes for over 5 years (usually it is more like a few months) but it is all properly documented in my medical records. 

I like the Health At Every Size approach - weight should not be a measure of health, concentrate on managing issues which are about health (e.g. what can I d to reduce my blood pressure?  what can I do to reduce my insulin levels?) instead.

regards, Deb


Dic Penderyn

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Then of course there are those who have steroid induced diabetes due to being treated for other conditions over prolonged periods with steroids how would they be factored in.
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

devine63

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good point Dic

there are also some people with brain injuries / tumours etc which result in diabetes - do they count all of the complications of the brain condition as a complication of the diabetes?

Also worth remembering that the head of the charity has a vested interest here - she wants lots of attention for her charity and lots of juicy donations....

regards, Deb