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Forum => Welfare Rights => Topic started by: swilliam on 01 Jan 2013 01:38PM

Title: Is there a definition of a 'substantially adapted' home
Post by: swilliam on 01 Jan 2013 01:38PM
I'm trying to establish what is termed 'substantially adapted' to qualify for a discretionary payment on a HA home with spare rooms ?

I currently have a full downstairs wet room that was put in by my HA landlord after I moved in, an extra handrail and a few minor aids for the upstairs toilet. However, I've heard a 'substantial adaption' would be a chair lift ?

Can anyone offer any thoughts ?

Many thanks :)
Title: Re: Is there a definition of a 'substantially adapted' home
Post by: devine63 on 02 Jan 2013 01:21AM
Hi Swilliam

I don't know of any formal definitions, but having had changes to a whole room sounds like substantial adaptation to me (adding a grabrail by the bath in an ordinary bathroom would be a minor adaptation).   You could contact your Local Authority to ask for a definition - or you could just state in your application  that you believe that your home is substantially adapted and see whether they challenge you on it.
regards, Deb
Title: Re: Is there a definition of a 'substantially adapted' home
Post by: Fiz on 02 Jan 2013 01:56AM
Good question swilliam, I have wondered the same myself. I suspect there isn't a definitive definition as yet but will be up to the discretion of the LA, however when push comes to shove hopefully people will start complaining and a definition will be forced.

I would think a wet room is a major adaption, hand rails aren't. Here I was offered a wet room but because I have a dd with ezcema which needs to be soaked I couldn't lose the bath, so I have had a shower fitted over the bath, rails and screen etc. which will not be seen as a major adaption whereas I would think the wet room offered would have. And if I move within 5 years (4 now as the DFG is one year old) I have to pay it all back. So I will be scuppered by the bedroom cap when one of the children move out.
Title: Re: Is there a definition of a 'substantially adapted' home
Post by: swilliam on 02 Jan 2013 02:17PM
In my case it was not an adaption, but was provided by the HA as part of their 'long term living'* for new propertys / tenants. My house was built in 2003 and also includes extra wide doors and stairs. I understand most if not all new social housing built from this period includes many simlar features.

* Long term living never included removing it from you !

It raises other concerns. IF ( and I say this lightly, knowing most of us are not wealthy ), you get a chance to buy your HA / Council home, you'll be unable to do so if your house as been adapted for disabled use. Worth keeping in mind. Althouhg I understand some HA's have provision to consider this at the time of application if its not sheltered disabled housing.
Title: Re: Is there a definition of a 'substantially adapted' home
Post by: devine63 on 03 Jan 2013 01:24AM
Hi Swilliam

if you need a wetroom rather than a standard bathroom, you should still be able to make the argument (worth a try).

Fiz why didn't they consider adding an en suite shower to one bedroom rather than changing the family bathroom?
Also: re the spare bedroom thing, you should be able to argue for a special case and / or discretionary housing payment I think.
regards, Deb

Title: Re: Is there a definition of a 'substantially adapted' home
Post by: One Girl and her Big Dog on 03 Jan 2013 10:39PM
I'd think anything which required a Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) eg.wet room, ramps, stair lift would be substantial, where as handrails would be minor.

1G