Debate: should people have a choice of luxurious cars on the motability scheme?

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oldtone27

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Your car probably has what some makers call an 'electronic' handbrake. I drove a courtesy car with such an arrangement and the handbrake automatically released as you pressed the accelerator and came on when you stopped. Very easy.

However, having had years of using the traditional handbrake without problem I kept founding my self reaching for it. I'm sure I would get used to it, but I think I prefer to have total control.

Years ago I had a Mercedes with a foot operated 'handbrake'. I never grew to like that arrangement.

JLR2

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I have found myself somewhat surprised by this posting. The first thing that hit me was the ending of the right to buy your motability car through the scheme. I was lucky enough, through a rather odd series of circumstances, to have begun buying my motability car years back, my second car was on the purchase scheme. Since then I have been buying my car and through the trade in route ended up with the car I have now a 207sw (my having started with the Peugeot 106) which is now paid off.

Back in 1990 as I was leaving the hospital following an outpatient appointment to do with my injuries from my car crash I was nearly knocked down by a Jaguar XJ as it reversed towards me from a set of traffic lights. The driver was the owner of a fruit market company I used to supply the shop my then wife and I ran. He offered me a lift home, to Castlemilk where I was then living. During the drive I noticed his blue badge on the dash board and told him of my surprise in seeing it. He explained that the car was his and he had used the mobility money awarded to him just to help with the costs involved in running the car.

I had wondered for a few years just how many car dealerships would handle the changes to mobility as so many claimants would be unsure just how long their entitlement to the benefit would be in place as Pip came into being and now I feel I know. The scrapping of the right to buy means claimants will never be faced with repossession of their vehicle due to non payment under a hire purchase arrangement and it will also make refusing claimants a renewal of their PiP award so much easier for the DWP as the car dealerships will not have long term contracts in place as they had under the old scheme. 

Fiz

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I had very little knowledge about motability when I wrote the op. At that point I'd just been surprised that it was possible to choose higher end cars.

I hadn't any idea until I'd read your post that there had been a time when you could literally purchase a car and assumed that it had always been a 3 year leasing scheme. Though reading back that was mentioned earlier but I hadn't absorbed that information.

The rules for WAVS are they different because you can buy them over time or lase them for a much longer time than the 3 years?

I've known people who were on highest rate DLA mobility have their motability car collected immediately following a DLA reassessment giving them a lower award. They then went to tribunal to challenge the new award which they were successful in and so paid another deposit for a new motability vehicle for a new 3 year lease. Knowing someone like that would make me wary of paying a big deposit as that person wasn't given their deposit back when the car was collected early. But things will probably have changed and my only knowledge of motability is from the people I know who've used the scheme. 

The government is in the process of removing the motability monopoly of leasing cars in exchange for the DLA/PIP highest mobility award which would open up other companies doing the same. The government feel that ending the monopoly will give customers better deals. But motability is a registered charity who are non profit making so the only way I can think of is the sales specialists who deal with motability earning less as well as the administration people in the office earning less but I'm just getting. Knowing so little about motability I was unsure what ending the motability monopoly will achieve.

neurochick

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Wav's aren't available on a hire purchase basis from Motability.  They are only available on the same basis as cars - contract hire.  However the standard  period is longer because of the much greater cost of the vehicles and typically the adaptions that people need.  There is also provision for contact hiring a 'nearly new' WAV for a period of 3 years.  There are WAVs that people have already had through Motability but which have been returned in the the first 30 months of their contract for some reason.

If you had a DLA award which stopped then the car would have to be returned but you don't lose all of the Advance Payment.  A pro-rated amount of your Advance Payment is always returned to you when the car is removed.  There are several transitional support packages offered by Motability where a DLA to PIP reassessment results in a loss of entitlement - the package you are entitled to is based on length of time you've continuously been a member of the scheme. I can't understand why the people you know would not have had a pro-rated amount of their Advance Payment returned when their entitlement to DLA HRM stopped part way through their lease.  That has always been the basis on which Motability leases have worked. 

The government is not removing Motability's monopoly or changing any of the basis on which Motability operates.  All that is happening is that the National Audit Office have agreed to do a report into Motability following the news a while back about the pay package of the Chief Exec and the substantial cash reserves that part of the Motability group has.  There may be proposed changes at some time in the future depending on the outcome of the NAO report and whatever recommendations they make but there is nothing on the table at the moment or for the foreseeable future.  I'm just making this point in case anyone is worried unnecessarily because they think things are changing when they aren't.     

bulekingfisher

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Hello Fiz


Your knowlage about sport's car been low to the ground is correct + there is no room to carry a wheelchair I know this because my brother drives a sports car

Fiz

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I am finding it painful both getting into and getting out of my car. Getting into is the most painful part and when I'm home having been out in it given how little I mobilise out of the car when I go places, I'm sure it's the getting in to the car that is causing me to be in a hell of a lot of pain once home, needing lots of pain meds to be able to lie down. I think what would be useful is something solid to hold with both arms while I lower myself into the drivers seat. Getting out is easier as the steering wheel is solid and helps. Once in the driving seat my back is totally supported in exactly the right position and I can drive pain free as there's a ledge to settle my left foot on at exactly the right distance to not get any pain from my left leg. It's my left leg that triggers the neuropain often so driving it is so comfortable and pain free. I'm finding that because getting into the car causes pain that continues through the day I'm limited to using the car about twice a week, three times at the very most. I'm not prescribed enough pain relief to use it more. But when I think back to the housebound months I do feel thankful for the car. I need to try and work at getting in easier. I wonder if a walking stick would help me lower down slowly. If so that would be easy to pop through to the rear footwell.

oldtone27

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I don't know how effective they are but a friend with mobility and pain problems has a handle like device that slots into the car door latch plate when the door is opened. There is a selection on the Amazon page below or seach for 'Handybar'.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_23?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=handybar+car+door+support+handle&sprefix=car+door+handle+support%2Caps%2C204&crid=6W8OJWTT2VSE

They are small enough to keep in a typical door pocket and probably more stable than a walking stick for getting in and out of a car.

Sunshine Meadows

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Oldtone,

Great link  >thumbsup<

I grabbed a video from YouTube

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMbc12aE1Lw[/youtube]

The fact Amazon have it on Prime suggests a person could try before they buy as long as the handybar does not end up looking used. It is a great idea for those who can use it.

Fiz,

I just read the whole thread and it looks like you just believed what the other person said about the Motability and went from there. It shows how there could still be a general belief going around that people can get expensive cars on Motability and it is disheartening. It might be a bit of a mental leap of logic but it seems to me the old 'facts' about what a sick and disabled person is entitled to are still enduring well past the days when papers like the Daily Mail were publishing articles about it.

 >angel<


Fiz

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Wow that looks like a great gadget, definitely worth exploring. I've found I can stand using the steering wheel and the seat back as leverage but that means both hands have to be free. I've also improved at getting in. Just with the door open as wide as it can I can reverse and sit on the seat sideways fine. If I then slowly lift my left leg in then my arms can often then lever me into the car and facing the right direction mostly without pain and my right leg behaves and can join its partner with no problems so I'm learning. And that learning means a trip in the car is no longer incapacitating me for the rest of the day. It's a real blessing. It took me longer to work out than I'd expected. And it can only be done slowly to be pain free so I'm dreading trying to get into the car in a downpour when instincts kick in and you rush!

Yes sunshine, I really knew very little about motability. When a person used the word buy I assumed they meant buy etc. I'm learning more about the scheme as I use it. My car has been such a blessing. Also because the garage I went to is a motability garage, my one dealing with Ford, Kia and Mazda, it meant the advisors were extremely knowledgeable about what someone with a disability needs. And were so patient about explaining every little thing and setting it up once it arrived before you collected it etc and then talked me through it all slowly. I'm embarrassed to say I've driven back to the garage twice following disagreements with the built in SatNav. Both times advisors sorted it out straight away and I'm now fairly sure the SatNav and I are on speaking terms. And I'm definitely more confident driving. After 29 months with no car I'd started off with real fear especially as I was changing to an automatic so my naff left leg can do nothing but I really like it now. I hope that motability vehicles are never threatened by further welfare cuts.