Brexit and what it means to us.

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Sunshine Meadows

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Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 29 Nov 2018 10:13AM
Teresa May and Brexit a committee meeting is one Sky News right now -I am trying to listen to it but it just feels like blah blah blah blah Blah.

Maybe I am looking in the wrong place but I have not seen a single thing about making the lives of sick and disabled people, poor people or minorities better during any of the Brexit talk stuff.

It seems like some of you will know more than me about this so could you either post a link to some straightforward information or just tell me your viewpoint?

KizzyKazaer

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Re: Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 29 Nov 2018 10:44AM
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.. I have not seen a single thing about making the lives of sick and disabled people, poor people or minorities better during any of the Brexit talk stuff.
Nope, I haven't either.. and if you're asking for opinions, this Brexit malarkey has dragged on far too long - and I do wonder if people would have still voted for it if they'd known in advance what a palaver it would turn out to be!

lankou

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Re: Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 29 Nov 2018 11:20AM
A personal decision I am making sure I have a two months supply of my prescription drugs.

Sunshine Meadows

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Re: Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 29 Nov 2018 12:27PM
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A personal decision I am making sure I have a two months supply of my prescription drugs.
At a personal level that is a good decision  >thumbsup<

I wonder how many sick and disabled people are doing that and what effect it is having on the medication supply chain. 

The way some Conservative MPs are behaving really shows their character and I am hoping will mean they get voted out next election.

lankou

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Re: Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 29 Nov 2018 12:34PM
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A personal decision I am making sure I have a two months supply of my prescription drugs.
At a personal level that is a good decision  >thumbsup<

I wonder how many sick and disabled people are doing that and what effect it is having on the medication supply chain.

The way some Conservative MPs are behaving really shows their character and I am hoping will mean they get voted out next election.

The subject of medicines supply is a news item on BBC News 24 today:-

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-46350966

The UK imports 37 million packs of medicine each month from the EU - although it exports even more.

The port of Dover is the key supply route in and the transition arrangements mean it will remain unaffected.

The key challenge will be if there is a no-deal Brexit, because there is concern of potential huge delays at the port.

The government has asked firms to stockpile a six-week supply of drugs to mitigate any problems if there is no deal.

However, that is logistically difficult for medicines that need refrigerating, like insulin and vaccines, or those with a short shelf life, such as some cancer drugs.

Supplies of radioactive materials for scans could also be hit.

Contingency plans have been put in place to fly in vital treatments, the government has said.

But even the stockpiling of normal medicines is proving problematic, according to industry.

Small firms in particular have reported problems stockpiling drugs because they do not have the cash flows to fund reserves of supplies.

Last month, Martin Sawer, of the Healthcare Distributors Association, told the Health Select Committee that he was "very concerned" about the prospect of a no deal, saying it could have "catastrophic" consequences for the supply of drugs.

He even suggested the public may have to stockpile drugs themselves.

The government has always insisted this is not needed - and could in fact make the situation worse.

Only this week, Health Secretary Matt Hancock was telling MPs that while a no-deal scenario would be "difficult", he was "confident that if everyone does everything they need to do, then we will have an unhindered supply of medicines".

SteveX

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Re: Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 29 Nov 2018 06:56PM
Teresa May and Brexit a committee meeting is one Sky News right now -I am trying to listen to it but it just feels like blah blah blah blah Blah.

Maybe I am looking in the wrong place but I have not seen a single thing about making the lives of sick and disabled people, poor people or minorities better during any of the Brexit talk stuff.

It seems like some of you will know more than me about this so could you either post a link to some straightforward information or just tell me your viewpoint?

Very good question tbh, I've not heard or seen anything like that either.  as per usual we are forgotten and 'hidden' in the background.

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Monic1511

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Re: Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 29 Nov 2018 08:55PM
I have my views on Brexit but it seems as if its about the trade deals.
you can correct me if Im wrong but this is my take on it
England voted to leave mainly because they didn't want to have free movement for other EAU citizens.  This was billed as the immigration issue and in some areas its portrayed as foreigners taking our jobs.  Yes there will be more jobs if all non UK citizens leave BUT there will be lots of low paid temporary jobs in hospitality, cleaning, fruit picking and care homes - domestics etc.  UK employers say that UK born people don't want these jobs and are not reliable, some people are too lazy to get up at 4 am to walk to work for the minimum wage. 

If the EU court has no jurisdiction then Westminster can repeal the working time directive and it will no longer give protection to employees working long hours, I believe a lot of the discrimination legislation comes from EU.

Travel - if there is no freedom of movement then there will be border controls, I don't travel to EU so have no idea of how long it takes to get through the airport but if everyone needs to be searched there will be further time delays.  Similarly with trade there will be border controls.

Health - you have already mentioned the possible import problems with medication but what about the trade details of a UK person on holiday in Spain takes unwell, will the government have to renegotiate the deals regarding treatment or will you not be treated till you can prove you can pay.

Other issues are that EU funding paid for lots of jobs and projects in poorer areas, that will go with the excuse that the government will fill the funding gap - sorry I don't believe that.

I suppose if there are more costs importing goods then the price of goods will rise,  fruit farmers are worried about getting enough labour to pick the fruit they grow.

From a perspective of disabled people I suppose its the medical research that seems to be a concern as the EU funding will be pulled and if the co-operation goes along with the funding then we will all suffer.

sorry if that's a ramble but that's the things that I believe Brexit means for someone like me.

Sunshine Meadows

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Re: Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 30 Nov 2018 08:57AM
Lankou,

Good article especially this 


Quote
Small firms in particular have reported problems stockpiling drugs because they do not have the cash flows to fund reserves of supplies.


even if we believe the Health Secretary when he says there will be an unhindered supply of medicine we are human beings who will do what we can to help ourselves and so many will either try to get more medication from the GP or they will go online and try to get drugs that way. The results of this is going to be two fold, firstly GP services are going to have more demand put on their time and funding as they have to absorb the cost of people asking/get more medication. Secondly, people who would never have gone online looking for drugs they routinely get on NHS prescription are going to put themselves at risk of buying drugs which are not what they seem or they are going to use more official services which cost more money. All of which has further consequences.

Steve,

I agree and it is almost like the Government and Daily Mail have realised that they have done all they can with us. That to cut out benefits further or try to self more papers with stories about us might cause public opinion to sweep away from seeing benefit claimants as lazy or greedy to seeing them as in need of help. I am over simplifying there because the general public is full of people who care about others and disagreed with the benefit cuts they just did not have as loud enough voice.

Monic,

I liked your post it reminded me to think about more aspects of brexit like EU funding for various projects in the UK. I am watching Sky News as I type and a bloke is talking about how 70,000 EU citizens work in the NHS and also that they are 102,000 vacancies in the NHS at the moment.

I wonder how many disabled people have retired to live in Europe and if Brexit goes through are now going to have to come 'home' to the UK. Their money will not go as far here and I dont think I am making a bad assumption when I say this would have place extra burden on local social care and health services,

lankou

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Re: Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 30 Nov 2018 08:19PM
Relevant to thread:-

Minister appears unprepared for impact of ‘no deal’ Brexit on social care

Live links at link:-
https://www.disabilitynewsservice.com/minister-appears-unprepared-for-impact-of-no-deal-brexit-on-social-care/

Minister appears unprepared for impact of ‘no deal’ Brexit on social care  0
BY JOHN PRING ON   NOVEMBER 30, 2018 INDEPENDENT LIVING
The health and social care secretary appears to have accidentally confessed to having no plans for dealing with the worsening social care recruitment crisis that is almost certain to hit the UK if the country is forced into a no-deal Brexit.

Matt Hancock was asked by a committee of MPs on Tuesday about the prospect of the UK leaving the European Union (EU) next March without agreeing a deal with the other 27 members.

The prospect of a no-deal Brexit, although still unlikely, is looking increasingly possible as a result of the seemingly intractable parliamentary deadlock over the UK’s planned exit from the EU next March.

Disabled people, including those who use personal assistants (PAs), have warned repeatedly of the risk that any form of Brexit could mean their access to PAs from EU countries could dry up, with a no-deal Brexit making this even more likely.

The disabled crossbench peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell told peers last year that John Evans, one of the founders of the UK independent living movement, had employed PAs from 15 EU countries in the past 34 years.

He had told her that if the government failed to protect access to the EU’s huge pool of people keen to work as PAs in the UK, he would lose his ability to live independently and could be forced to return to residential care, 34 years after he was liberated from a Cheshire Home.

But Hancock’s evidence this week to the Commons health and social care committee (pictured), and subsequent statements by his press office, appear to show that he has no plans in place for dealing with a social care recruitment crisis if the UK crashes out of the EU without a deal next spring.

Labour’s Diana Johnson had asked Hancock: “If we have a no deal scenario, what is your policy for recruitment to social care in the future?

“How are you going to deal with that?”

Hancock, who also confirmed later that he still plans to publish the government’s long-awaited adult social care green paper by the end of the year, told the committee in response that there was a higher proportion of people working in social care in the UK who were from outside the EU than from EU countries.

But his only answer to how he would cope with the impact of a no-deal Brexit on social care recruitment appeared to be to “train people locally and give people from the UK opportunities to work in social care” and to make sure “it is yet more of a rewarding career”.

He said: “I think these things are all part of trying to make sure that social care can give the dignity that it ought to.

“It’s something that we care a lot about getting right.”

A Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) spokeswoman said afterwards: “We are confident of reaching a deal with the EU which benefits our health and care workforce.

“We want to promote adult social care as a career of choice and are launching a national recruitment campaign in the new year to raise the image and profile of the sector.

“Our upcoming green paper will also look at how we can recruit and retain a valued workforce.”

DHSC was due to launch a pilot scheme today (Thursday) to provide the 104,000 EU nationals working in social care in the UK with an opportunity to apply early to the government’s EU settlement scheme.

But the DHSC spokeswoman also said that that recruitment campaign and the green paper were “going ahead regardless of whether or not we get a deal and both aim to help with recruitment and retention”.

She refused to confirm that there were no extra plans in place for social care recruitment in the event of a no-deal Brexit, although DHSC has now been given several opportunities to explain what they might be if they did exist.

Hancock had told the committee that it was easier now to recruit people into social care because of the introduction of the government’s “national living wage”, which had led to workers in the sector receiving “some of the fastest pay rises” across the economy as so many of them were previously only being paid the minimum wage.

Hancock had said that it was “important to plan for all eventualities” and so his department was planning for the possibility of a no-deal Brexit’s impact on the NHS although it did not think that was likely to happen.

He said: “A no-deal scenario for the NHS will be difficult but we are confident that if everybody does everything that they need to do then we will have an unhindered supply of medicines.

“We can make sure that we get the talent that we need from around the world and we can have a medicine and medical devices regulation system that can provide for access to the best new medicines.”

He added: “As a contingency we prepare for all eventualities, including no-deal, and no-deal clearly is the one that makes life… for which we have to do the most preparation.”

The committee had earlier heard from Mark Dayan, a policy and public affairs analyst at Nuffield Trust, that a no-deal Brexit would likely cause “quite a big problem for social care” because of the sector’s current reliance on EU workers, and because it has to compete for workers with other low-paid sectors in the UK economy.

He said the government would have “total freedom” with its immigration policy in such a situation and so could keep allowing people who want to work in social care into the country but he said that “all the indications we have are that that will not be the case and that there will be strong impediments to workers with lower salaries and lower qualifications”.

He told Johnson: “The social care sector is in an extremely weak position to start raising wages to try and bring in a bigger share of a pool that is not growing as quickly, so I think you are absolutely right to flag that up as a concern.

“For me it’s a bigger one actually than the [impact of a no-deal Brexit on the]NHS workforce.”

 


On the edge

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Re: Brexit and what it means to us.

  • on: 02 Dec 2018 11:18AM
Brexit means all issues of welfare, care and disability rights are 'left on the table' until Brexit is sorted, which means basically our issues and rights will never be respected.  I think the disabled areas have thrown in the towel since 110,000 premature deaths have failed to stir up any mass attempt to go at the systems and medias contributing to hate against us.  Recent despicable approaches by UK's leading 'charities' to sign up to a non-critical clause against the DWP and it's representatives, because of threats to reduce or remove funding, is just one of many areas where we are now on our own, whilst corporate charity takes over, and freezes us out of any say.  £6B+ of funding money isn't to be sniffed at, or £14B a year sent off to 'poor disabled elsewhere' every year, and not given over to the actual people it is intended for, and stolen from.  Most issues are at root and branch 'awareness', none has actually benefitted us, and too many running this 'system' of awareness are in it for less than equality reasons!  I've just seen this week at least 15 petitioning requests in my in-box and binned them! As IF anyone actually reads or acts on any of them.