The 1% share of housing thing????

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Paranoid

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The 1% share of housing thing????

  • on: 04 Dec 2018 11:32AM
I read somewhere about social housing tenants getting offered the potential to buy 1% of their property a year.

If mine is a 'social housing disabled bungalow' does that change its legal status?  Will it then just be a normal 'part-share' property (that you don't necessarily have to be in a wheelchair or disabled to live in - some are family homes, some are over 55's) like my neighbours properties and I'd be expected to pay for things for boiler servicing and repairs etc myself? 

Would it apply to my property?  as it was built for wheelchair users? I was under the understanding that you had to be a full time wheelchair user to get it, so was greatly surprised to see my neighbour in the 'wheelchair bungalow' next door walking round the garden without even a walking aid. I thought I'd have to leave if I ever recovered mobility so this has confused me as I've had 3 sets of neighbours in the 'disabled bungalow' next door, (over 12 years) all of whom I've seen walking about without any aids at some point, so wondering if I misunderstood the tenancy/name/purpose of property?  (I do have Mental Health issues too and tend to think very literally).

I wondered if anyone on here might know more about this 'part-share' thing legally? As I don't want to ask unless I know i could afford to buy 1% each year and whether this would give me any benefits I don't currently have or make things more complicated/leave me worse off? And when it might be happening?  who or what properties it would apply to?

Thanks

P



Spindrift

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I had to Google for more information and found this https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45176684


Quote
The Green Paper also pledges a scheme to offer tenants the right to buy 1% of their home each year.
A Green Paper is a report made by the government which at the moment means Teresa May's Conservative government. The Green Paper is meant to provoke discussion and it's contents legally binding.


I can see how owning 1% of a social housing dwelling could give you a sense of security when it comes to your circumstance. I don't know if improvements in physical or mental health cause people in social housing to lose their tenancy hopefully someone else has more information.

Paranoid

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I had to Google for more information and found this https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45176684


Quote
The Green Paper also pledges a scheme to offer tenants the right to buy 1% of their home each year.
A Green Paper is a report made by the government which at the moment means Teresa May's Conservative government. The Green Paper is meant to provoke discussion and it's contents legally binding.


I can see how owning 1% of a social housing dwelling could give you a sense of security when it comes to your circumstance. I don't know if improvements in physical or mental health cause people in social housing to lose their tenancy hopefully someone else has more information.


Thanks for answering. I wondered if I had misunderstood though I know I had to give them alot of evidence from medical professions that my condition would be lifelong and wasn't sure if that meant all my conditions or only the one that specifically caused me to need a wheelchair at the time of applying.

As it is I think I was originally misdiagnosed however am now actually developing arthritis which does run in my family and several family members have/or have had (if they've since passed away) it. So although my physical difficulties are not exactly the same as when I originally applied for the bungalow 14yrs ago (had to wait 2 yrs to get it and move in) I am now in my 50's and have other physical disabilities such as vein damage, swelling in leg, arthritis in same knee and in finger joints, related jaw pain when the flare up is really bad also causing neuralgia and severe tinnitus on that side of face, alot of stiffness and back pain (particuarly through winter, get some respite in summer from pain/stiffness but then leg with vein damage swells more then due to the heat so can't win!) plus the same mental health issues I had when I moved in.

I still need mobility aids and use them daily, I just would no longer consider myself what most people would describe as 'confined' to a wheelchair (I hate that phrase!) and unable to get in or out of one independently. I still wouldn't be able to get in out of a normal bath or use a bathroom or kitchen wasn't adapted as I still have to sit to do things such as cook. For anything more than a few steps round the house I need an electric wheelchair or mobility scooter to get there independently or a manual one (if someone else is taking me so can push!).

I just worry as people are so quick to judge these days and people seem to be getting more and more aggressive towards disabled people in public. I'm almost scared to admit I may have a good day or two incase people accuse me of 'faking it'.

I have been through the PIP recently, they have all my up to date medical info, did a face to face home assessment so have actually met me in person and recognise I get some fluctuation in symptoms and day to day ability, on ESA so been told I won't get changed to UC until next year not before July 2019.though heard it had been back again to Nov 2019?

It would be a worry if I lost some income on UC and had already bought 1% then couldn't afford to the same the following year if things didn't go to plan.  I'm not sure what would happen then either?

Fiz

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That'll be interesting. As the conservatives have been slated for allowing council stock to be bought by tenants vastly reducing social housing stock I'm really surprised to see this on the agenda. The offer of purchase is only available with a secure tenancy and people stopped being given secure tenancies a few years back, now local authorities are giving people a fixed term assured tenancy, my niece who has boys aged 5 and 9 has was allocated a ten year fixed assured tenancy at the start of this year after which they'll assess her needs and if they feel she no longer requires two bedrooms the LA can downsize her. I think I was in the final year of secure tenancies.

As for your neighbours you've had, their needs will have been fully assessed with medical evidence to be allocated such a bungalow and those medical conditions aren't necessarily visible. Someone with multiple cardiac surgeries who is at high risk of cardiac arrest would be eligible for a property without stairs as a matter of urgency and yet they'd be able to walk around their garden for example.

But with the demise of secure tenancies should such a patient have a heart transplant and be deemed a much lower risk they might be rehoused in a warden assisted flat or some such. 

It will be interesting to see if the 1% a year goes through, and as you say, how that will affect maintenance responsibility or even spare room reduction in housing benefit.