NHS 111 ambulances and Accident & Emergency departments.

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Sunshine Meadows

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Too long a post and needs editing > Sunshine
« Last Edit: 10 Feb 2019 06:49PM by Sunshine Meadows »

Sunshine Meadows

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Sorry about the length , spelling and grammar mistakes  >whistle<

KizzyKazaer

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Can you also enlarge the text, please?  I'd like to read it without squinting!  ;-)

PS - hope Mr Sunshine isn't too poorly (I did skim the post)
« Last Edit: 10 Feb 2019 05:45PM by KizzyKazaer »

Sunshine Meadows

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Kizzy sorry about the text size and thank you for trying to read it. Looking at it again the opening post I made was too rough and ready so I deleted it.

It was about Mr Sunshine being in A and E with what they thought might be a heart attack, what it was like to be there and the fact he was given medication without much explanation apart from spots on his lung that showed up on an xray. 

He is still poorly but we are okay  >bighugs<

Monic1511

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I hope he is feeling better and that you are not too stressed,  >hugs<

JLR2

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 >hugs< Sunshine I hope everything is going OK. I can only imagine how you must be feeling just now, from my experience of my friend in Berlin's life day to day as her father deteriorated before he went into the care home it wasn't a great feeling not knowing from one day, even hour to hour how he was. Things like trying to do the shopping were done almost at running pace as my friend worried if her father had had an accident whilst she was out.

Has Mr Sunshine been admitted to hospital or is he at home with yourself?

auntieCtheM

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Sunshine Meadows

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Thank you  >hugs<

The problem with the opening post was it was about Mr Sunshine falling ill, me in my wheelchair and how I cope and also about what Accident and Emergency was like. 

Mr Sunshine is home with me, his side and chest still hurt and so he is taking it easy. He is my carer so he is the one that drives us about, gets the wheelchair in and out the house, and navigates to where we are going and inside buildings eg hospitals. When he broke his ankle I did not go in the ambulance with him and a friends took me to the hospital the next day. This time the car paramedic put in a amber call for an ambulance but it was going to be a long wait. Mr Sunshine was not allowed to drive himself and he was not allowed to go in a taxi on his on in case he fell more ill. In the end he and I got a taxi to the big hospital 40 minutes away. I have been to the local Small Injuries clinic a bunch of times so I am used to having to wait but the experience of Accident and Emergency in a big hospital was very different, especially when they moved us to the area with beds in bays where it seemed every bay had a patient on a trolley in it and a patient on a trolley just outside. There was a bank of computers on desks down the middle of the room and because the trolley patients had been 'stacked' the space between the back of the desk chairs and the a patient on a trolley was tiny.

A couple of friends arrived to get me home and into the house and I was set to meet them at reception the only thing was I could not work out how to get there. The nearest set of doors open towards me which anyone who uses a wheelchair knows is difficult so I waited until someone else came the other way opened the door and I asked for help. The staff member got confused (probably my fault) then did take me back to reception -  there is more than one. I did not even recognise my friend when I saw him. My friends got me home, into the house, something to eat and drink, fed the pets and got me a blanket from upstairs. The friend with the car then needed to go to work (night shift).

Mr Sunshine came home by taxi a few hours later, and he was not sure of the diagnosis (which is bonkers). My guess is the medical people figured he was not dying and they needed to make space for drunk s and people who got into fights  :-(

Fiz

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>bighugs<  >bighugs<  one for you and one for Mr Sunshine

If you phone you GP and ask for a summary of the A&E report, it arrives there 24 hours after being in A&E so the GP can read all tests made, their results and any diagnosis and transpose that into English and tell you.

I'm afraid I've been in A&E many times only twice for medical emergencies, the rest all self inflicted. In my A&E there is always a queue of trolleys with people on banked up along two corridors, each moved forward one by one until eventually a majors bay become free. That's the most unrealistic thing about the series Casualty, people there are seen shortly after arrival.

It must have been a total nightmare for you both, practically and emotionally. I hope you both rest well and can get the results from your GP soon

KizzyKazaer

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Thanks for re-posting in normal text size  >thumbsup<

The way A & E is these days, it would be an ordeal for anybody not using a wheelchair, so I can only imagine how stressful the whole business was for you - I think it's disgusting how, in a supposedly First World country, people can be treated like this  >thumbsdown<  Big  >hugs<  to both of you.

JLR2

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"That's the most unrealistic thing about the series Casualty, people there are seen shortly after arrival."

I wonder what would happen were a series like Casualty to do an episode with the main theme/story relating to banking of patients on trolleys and the real pressure A&Es are under?  A bit like the way series like Eastenders or Coronation St tend to do.

Sunshine Meadows

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Quote
If you phone you GP and ask for a summary of the A&E report, it arrives there 24 hours after being in A&E so the GP can read all tests made, their results and any diagnosis and transpose that into English and tell you.
Mr Sunshine pooped into our GP surgery today and asked about his records. The notes from the NHS 111 call are there but nothing else. I find that shocking in this day and age I mean it is one thing to be disorganised and not give Mr Sunshine a discharge note when he left the hospital, and a whole other level not adding anything to his NHS record. If he was to fall ill again what can we say to the paramedic pffffft. All we have is the fact we know Mr Sunshine was put on a nebuliser (not sure I mentioned that yet), he had an extra, and we have two medication boxes with hand written name and date on them :-(


You are right about the Casualty being unrealistic, stacking patients right in front of the bays and there being so little space to move or site shocked me the most.

JLR good question, maybe there would be an outcry or maybe too many people would switch over to whatever reality tv show was on. Actually that is a point 24 hours in A&E has not (As far as I know) show the type of situation i saw the other night.

Kizzy I did not repost the whole thing just a shorter easier to follow version. Thank you for saying it would be an ordeal for anyone, I was worrying that the fact I could only see so much from the wheelchair m eant I was being too critical.

>bighugs<
« Last Edit: 13 Feb 2019 09:29AM by Sunshine Meadows »

JLR2

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Just thinking there as I read postings and it occurred to me that were a Fire and Rescue service inspector to carry out an assessment of the fire hazards posed by patients being banked up in hospital corridors the NHS, or perhaps more warranted the government, might find they have a problem.

Hospital corridors were and are designed as they are, I'm sure, to facilitate emergency evacuations should circumstances require such an action be carried out.

Sunshine Meadows

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JLR,

It probably depends on how often and for how long patients are stacked. It might be a question that does not get asked because there is no alternative to the stacking of patients.

One reason Mr Sunshine ended up pushing me through the short corridors to the big room was there was obstacles on either side. I have never been to the A & E at that hospital before and I don't know how long it has been like that.

Fiz

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Casualty and Holby have both done one off programmes on a real problem but that in itself makes it worse in my view because it creates the view that chaos and inadequacies happen once every decade. I don't think it would add much to the cost of Casualty if they had a couple of coridoors with stacked trolleys with "extras" or actors in pain or unwell for the duration of the programme each week as part of the scene set up which is actual real life. I'm watching the Hospital programme each week and my heart bleeds every programme when I see cancer patient's operations cancelled due to lack of beds sometimes two or three times. People needing urgent surgery but because there are no beds free in ICU their operations just can't happen. The frustration on the surgeons faces. Every week I think how can politicians live with themselves watching this? But they're probably watching Holby instead and are thinking what a great NHS we have and how smoothly it runs!

Sunshine, I would really hope that your GP surgery would get a report from A&E at some stage even if it's the old fashioned slower route. Ours is all computerised so it's all really quick. It could be dangerous if they didn't. In my surgery the secretaries have no access at all to medical notes, the only thing they can see are blood test results which they're not supposed to give to the patient before they've been reviewed by a doctor but I have managed to squeeze out of them some results before just to reassure myself. I say this because maybe the secretaries can't see the hospital notes themselves though if that was the case I would have thought they'd have said that to Mr Sunshine. I'm actually pleased the secretaries can't read my notes, they're too personal in my view. I've never been on the stacked trolley queue less than an hour before being allocated a bay before, and it has been towards two hours on a couple of occasions. And this is the majors department, not the minors.

JLR yes one of our trolley queue coridoors has the double door access to resuss towards the entrance end of that coridoor so the ambulance crew have to run alongside them and through the resuss doors with red lighted patients. The only thing that has improved is now when arriving at A&E by ambulance the trolley is placed in a bay in a new extension to be triaged. There they take your obs and record them and take bloods and send them to be tested and they put a cannula in before placing you in the coridoor queue. I thought that might shorten the wait for a majors bay the first time I saw the new triage extension for majors but it doesn't shorten it at all. All it does do is by the time you are placed in a majors bay and finally get to see a doctor, they have seen your blood test results so they have a knowledge base to start from and they can administer IV pain relief and fluids straight away as the cannula has been done. The wait hasn't decreased on trolleys because once a patient in a bay has been deemed to need to be admitted they remain in the bay, blocking it, while a bed is found somewhere in the hospital. Things have definitely got a lot worse since I was nursing in the early 80's. I don't recognise the stress everyone is under there. My dd starts her new job later this month in a busy paediatric A&E. She had a placement there as a student nurse so she knows what's she's getting.

I was going to ask if Mr Sunshine had an arterial blood gas test while in A&E but that was bl**dy nosey so don't answer but the reason I asked was an arterial blood gas test is put into a machine in A&E and instantly gives the condition of the heart so they can rule out MI's (heart attacks) and other heart issues like valve problems instantly so heart problems can be ruled out quickly. An arterial blood gas test is taken from the wrist by a thick strong needle then penetrates deeply to access the artery and it really hurts! So he'd know if he had one and if he did and they then concentrated on lungs and not his heart he can be reassured his heart is working fine. Hope that makes sense.

There is no doubt that every single majors A&E department is not able to care for patients as is needed and a permanent bed shortage in hospitals is a big part of that. Really sad.