England, Scotland and Brexit - Controlling my temper

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JLR2

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What is it with the education some folk have managed to retain into their later years?  Today I was having not too bad a day, I managed to beat my rival (a mate) 6/4 on the pool table) and though we did lose 10/9 at the dominoes things were fine.

Sadly one of the regular dominoes players and I had a few words about, yes you've guessed, brexit. Now as it happens I am a Scot born in Bridgeton Glasgow and as a Scot I'll die at some point just as everyone else on this planet will again no problem there. However when discussing the referendum that saw the UK decide it is leaving the EU I made mention of the fact that 62% of Scotland voted to remain whereupon I was informed, with strong and forcible language, that the referendum was a UK vote. I replied to this by reminding my friend that Scotland is not a village/large town but a Country to which the reply came "DH" I'm abbreviating the words but hope it will not take much thought to understand or guess what was said to me.

I like to think we here on these pages come from all parts of the UK and I have never thought less of others should they be from outwith Scotland, it simply has never crossed my mind as we all share in the misery that the DWP is inflicting on us and I hasten to add others not subject to the welfare state's terms and conditions.

I have many times tried to say on here and elsewhere on-line that I and I feel many other Scots do not look on the people of England as being responsible for what we see coming out of Westminster but when an Englishman (the fellow domino player) refers to me as a DH he has crossed a line, one that I do not lightly, he has made a serious error. For me it means I will not engage in conversation or such as domino matches in the pub again with the guy and perhaps for me it might be a good idea if I leave returning to my local for a number of years as I think it better than my rearranging the guy's head to resemble a broken window.

JLR2 - have expanded on the title as it's in News & Current Affairs - KK
« Last Edit: 09 Sep 2019 05:45PM by KizzyKazaer »

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Controlling my temper

  • on: 08 Sep 2019 11:00PM
Ok, I'm not Scottish.  I was born in England and have ancestry on both sides from elsewhere, but not for at least 3 generations (great-grandparents +).

Even I can work out that my country has left a trail of pain around the world from empire building.

Our leaders left a trail of pain around our own country from playing silly wotsits over who ruled what. 

Union between the different bits of the UK, whilst, for my taste, being currently, on balance, beneficial, is something we English have to accept comes with 'history' in the non-English bits.  We need to be sensitive to that.

Personally, my repeated niggle about what's what in this country is the word (yes, I get heated about the overtones of words) 'Brexit'.  Hmm.  Maybe we missed something there?  Ah, yes, is it going to be UK-exit or Britain-exit?  Oh well, what do we English care about that lot across the water?  (Hides head in shame.)

So if an Englishwoman is allowed to suggest to a Scotsman what to do, perhaps regard people, including English people, who have no respect for Scotland's identity, history and legal status as being twerps who need to grow up.

And whilst I feel no obligation to apologise on behalf of another English person, I would like to say "Not in my name."

I must go now.  I have a sudden urge to listen to the Corries singing "Scottish holiday".
« Last Edit: 09 Sep 2019 11:16AM by Sunny Clouds »
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Sunny Clouds

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Re: Controlling my temper

  • on: 09 Sep 2019 11:24AM
The Corries' song I referred to.  (In the hopes of reminding Scottish posters & lurkers that some English people can laugh at ourselves.)



It's a gentle tease from a Scottish viewpoint of non-Scottish people holidaying in Scotland.  There's a lovely comment from one of the group to a member of the audience at the beginning.

Don't listen if you don't like a giggle.

I personally need humour and niceness to help me cope with all the hostility and friction that politicians, non-politicians with power or influence, and parts of the media have stirred up.

Declaration of interest - I'm a remainer.  Of my two living close relatives, one voted leave (having decided on the way to the polling station) and one didn't bother to vote.  I'm trying to avoid the subject but it makes it difficult to plan certain family financial matters.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

JLR2

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Re: Controlling my temper

  • on: 09 Sep 2019 12:28PM
Hello Sunny, I have no real problems with the folk of England though behaviour such as that from my fellow dominoes player is something no one should find themselves subject to and this goes where the verbal abuse goes between a Scot and someone from outwith Scotland. The guy I usually have my little pool battle with is against Scotland seeking its regaining of its independence and whenever the issue comes up we have a chuckle agreeing not to go there as we both know where we stand on the issue, what we do not do is resort to abusive language.

Re Kilts Sunny, I wouldn't wear one even though I now live in the Highlands, for a few reasons, first I'm a Lowlander (Glasgow born) and as such it is the tartan trews for me >biggrin< secondly wi'ma legs I'd be a sight and lastly ah couldnae go the draft >lol<

huhn

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Re: Controlling my temper

  • on: 09 Sep 2019 05:15PM
hey  guys,  you made me smile, it is not a problem between scots and english it is the problem between old resident never got his nose out and a person new to the place , even when it is 500 years ago.

KizzyKazaer

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Quote
..it might be a good idea if I leave returning to my local for a number of years as I think it better than my rearranging the guy's head to resemble a broken window.

 >lol<  seriously though.. I know the Brexit issue stirs up many passions, but there's no excuse for anyone to be as rude and insulting as that man  >doh<

Anyway, the way things are going I wonder if Brexit will actually happen at all - what an unholy mess!

JLR2

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I would suggest, for those who might not have caught it, tuning into the BBC's iPlayer to watch part 2 of "Rise of the Nazis" the parallels with today's Tory government including Dominic Cummings are all too clear.

lankou

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I would suggest, for those who might not have caught it, tuning into the BBC's iPlayer to watch part 2 of "Rise of the Nazis" the parallels with today's Tory government including Dominic Cummings are all too clear.

Very worrying parallels.

JLR2

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Were it not for the fact that the BBC would find itself compelled by the real Prime Minister, Dominic Cummings, to end its licence fee funding and seek its financing from private sector sources it, the BBC, would itself flag up the parallels between the rise of the Nazi regime and today's government.

It might just turn out to be the case that the BBC had an idea that many of those who watched the 3 part series would see the parallels without the need to have them pointed out. Again it might have been a case where the BBC decided to bring forward or air this series now to heighten its impact and relevance to current events here in the UK.

Sunny Clouds

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At least Private Eye has had the guts to do a front page cartoon about it.  Two pictures.  "Queen's speech then" shows horsedrawn royal carriage.  "Queen's speech now" shows a tank.

All we can do is as we've been doing as disability rights and support have been cut here (or elsewhere, such as where Huhn is), and doing whatever we can in our own way, big or little, because it all adds up.

Words spoken to a neighbour, a post on FB or twitter, attending a demo, signing a petition, lobbying an MP, supporting a legal challenge etc.

The mental image I like to remind people of is the famous battle of Cable Street.

For any posters that don't know, with the rise of fascism in the 1930s, Mosely's fascist mob planned a march through london, including Cable Street, which is now a central expensive area  - financial institutions, tourists, rich people - but then had lots of ordinary people living in it.

When the fascist march arrived, they met barricades with people who'd come from near and far to stop them, but the police tried to make a way through for the march.

Now for the mental image to keep - ordinary people opened their windows and chucked the contents of their chamber pots on the marchers, who gave up and went away.

I daresay it took more than urine and faeces to stop them, but that is said to have been a key factor.

Part of me wants to emigrate but I've no idea where I'd go, and one day when I was in a gloomy depressed moment of thinking how so much of my prime has been wasted, I thought what would I be prepared to die for?  Or even just to have lived for?

Maybe I could be brave enough just to be one of millions that speak up a bit in my own way.  Maybe we all could.  Some will be brave enough to stand up publicly, to lead, to organise.  Others will maybe just do little things privately.  But it adds up.

I thought of my father's drawn-out death from dementia. Even if things ended up as they have done even recently in various countries with peaceful protesters badly wounded or killed, I can't say that would be a worse end.  Note that I am not saying you should therefore take the same risks.  I'm saying just that if we each do what we feel able to, some far more than me, some far less, then maybe we can stave off the worst extremism.
« Last Edit: 11 Sep 2019 11:38AM by Sunny Clouds »
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)