I wonder if....

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JLR2

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I wonder if....

  • on: 17 Feb 2020 08:20PM
Earlier as I was watching the news on channel 4 about the flooding I noticed the piece of interviewing with a Tory MP a thought crossed my wee mind.

For all the reporting and commentary about this particularly bad spell of flooding with many references being made to how much of it could be laid at the door of climate change I wonder if it has crossed the minds of either manufacturers of electric vehicles or the government that were we ever to see, as the government intends, the manufacture of petrol and diesel vehicles/cars ended (2035 being I think one of the dates mentioned recently) and future car sales being electric only the charging infrastructure required will have to be in place but in what place will these charging points be put?

How often have we watched news reports regarding electric vehicles with background pictures of cars being charged by the side of some road somewhere with the cable hooked up to some nearby charging station? Just how in the name of the wee man is anyone going to charge their electric car when it's submerged up to its bonnet by a flooding river? 

This also brings to my mind the question about how reliable future solely battery powered cars will be when subjected to the levels of flooding we are witnessing now?

Would the batteries of todays electric powered cars still work having been completely submerged as result of a flooding? It is one thing to provide splash protection for an electric car being driven down say a main road in heavy rain but quite another, I would have thought to completely submerge the battery with its electrical connections to the drive system.

Maybe I'm just daft and the designers of solely electrically powered cars have thought of this and have an answer but if I'm no maybe so daft they'd better get their thinking caps on.
« Last Edit: 17 Feb 2020 08:24PM by JLR2 »

JLR2

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 17 Feb 2020 08:46PM
I've just done a wee bit of googling what happens to electric cars when flooding and it seems that the way in which they are designed takes into account the subject of flooding. Apparently these vehicles have very well sealed electrics but just as happens in the main with petrol or diesel cars they tend to be written off by insurers if flooded.

KizzyKazaer

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 17 Feb 2020 09:24PM
Well, at least some designer has thought ahead there!  Perhaps an equally bright mind can be put to work regarding the charging point issue..

JLR2

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 17 Feb 2020 09:33PM
Kizzy, I certainly wouldn't fancy standing in a puddle whilst trying to hook up my car to a charging point or trying to do it in heavy rain >yikes<

oldtone27

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 18 Feb 2020 09:03AM
I have doubts about the achievability of the necessary infrastructure for electric cars by 2032/35. I think two criteria need to be fulfilled.

1: sufficient charging points. It seems to me the most logical aim should be to provide a charging point alongside every petrol pump. That will make them accessible without adding to congestion and deals with the problem of people not having off street parking at home.

2: As consequence of above fast charging is essential. Even the best points at present seem far to slow to support a long journey which necessitates a break for refuelling. The points need to be able to fully charge for at least 300 miles or so in the same time that it takes to fill up with petrol.

Until such times such an infrastructure is in place I cannot see a widespread uptake of electric cars. I also think there is an even bigger problem in respect of buses and large commercial vehicles.

huhn

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 18 Feb 2020 11:04AM
i went  few years ago with my son to a car factory who does  electric cars an he  has ask them a lot of questions. in the end his critic points are
=the battery is inbuilt so when the battery is gone the car is gone
=second the battery size is still  far to big to get a  small town car size
=third  battery is not good for extreme  mountainous areas to be  effective and the biggest problem what he found is
=no  adaptation for handy capped people like it is done now with conventional cars like all things  for hand use and not for   leg use
 = and other problem is  batteries are not  good on islands, through the salt content in the air

JLR2

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 19 Feb 2020 07:08AM
Huhn, you've raised a number of points that I admit hadn't crossed my mind but in reading what you posted I can understand to some extent why it is the electric car lobby have not made mention of the issues you have mentioned. I've a few small rechargeable devices, music players and the like, and I have read, on Amazon UK's customer opinion pages, about how their devices had stopped recharging. I've been lucky so far with mine but when it comes to something like an E/V car battery dying or being unable to recharge what is the owner of such a car supposed to do, pray?

Sunshine

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 19 Feb 2020 09:16AM
I agree about the charging ports and the need for fast charging etc. Also what was said about the reliability of batteries made me think about how far batteries have come. For example fifteen years ago my original Powertrike had lead acid batteries and a inefficient motor with little torque to get up slopes. The only original parts I have now are the frame and docking mechanism all the rest is a Team Hybrid upgrade. The Nimah batteries are reliable and easily last four times longer than the old ones.

The way governments are emphasising Climate Change and I have not heard Peak Oil mentioned once.

I had not thought about the effects on islands maybe some places will have to use biofuel.

JLR2

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 19 Feb 2020 01:38PM
Och folk using biofuel might still find themselves demonised by the green lobby, I'm really getting cheesed off by the Green's leader in the Scottish Parliament, Patrick Harvey, he appears determined to blackmail the SNP folk into going down his/their path in pursuit of making the country carbon neutral within a few years.

Once the majority have gone electric so far as their mode of transport goes the power companies will quickly find an excuse to tell us the cost of energy has to increase in order to fund future (non existent) upgrades and investments in the power supply system. I've heard many times in years gone by companies such as BT telling customers in part the reason their bills are increasing is due to the costs involved in maintaining the systems infrastructure, well I've not heard of power cables and the like being so fragile they need constant replacement, least not to the extent claimed by BT and if they are so fragile perhaps they (BT) should invest in more robust materials.

oldtone27

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 19 Feb 2020 03:38PM
Regarding electricity for cars, whilst I understand it carries no tax at present I don't see that situation lasting once the sale of petrol declines.

The government will want to replace lost tax either by taxing electricity directly, although that will be unpopular regards to domestic use. More likely, I think, will be the introduction of taxing by mile and time of day. The technology exists already.

JLR2

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Re: I wonder if....

  • on: 19 Feb 2020 08:36PM
"The government will want to replace lost tax either by taxing electricity directly, although that will be unpopular regards to domestic use. More likely, I think, will be the introduction of taxing by mile and time of day. The technology exists already."

Too right they will Oldtone, we've seen something similar happening when, I think it was under the London zone (I can't mind the actual name for it) where cars are charged for entry into London. When this zone thing was started electric cars were zero rated and incurred no charge but now they are charged albeit at a lower rate.

I'm sure the various power companies will be constructing their story lines justifying future increases in the domestic electric charges as more customers cut their use of electric or at least more careful in what they use. When the reduction in demand from customers begin to hit the profit margins and in turn the dividend to shareholders of particularly the big six energy providers the prices will rise pretty much in tandem with any reductions in use. Is it any wonder folk can become depressed?  I mean what chance to we have?