Author Topic: The Corona Virus 2020 - theories, expectations and practical tips  (Read 3357 times)

Sunshine

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Huhn,

>bighugs< >bighugs< >bighugs< 

Good Morning All,

I managed to get some time upstairs so I am now using my Desktop computer. Sunny made a lot of good points.

I had started feeling guilty that I bought extra items including a multipack of hand sanitizer back at the end of January. It was when the majority of people were going with the flow and they did  not expect any big issues to arise. I bought things online so I could avoid asking Mr Sunshine going to the shops, firstly because he was like 'WHY????' and secondly I did not want people to see the contents of our trolley and have a panic buy triggered in store because of that. At this point I could just use my credit card and buy more and more but the shift in the the behaviour of so many people means I will be trying to maintain what we have rather than expand on it. I don't want to leave people without the opportunity to buy something because I bought more. There is one exception to this and that is dried pet food for the cats and dogs which I have bought online. The reason being the cats and dogs can't live on pasta and oxtail soup.

When the crisis is over and the ordinary able bodied people who panic bought in store and grabbed online shopping delivery dates in the last week or so have time to reflect, I wonder if they will be able to understand how sick and disabled people often have to live day to day, week to week, month to month.

KizzyKazaer

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The selfish barstewards who are clearing the shelves, so no-one else can get what they need  >steam< , don't seem to be responding to any call to their better nature (if they even have one) so I almost cheered to the news that supermarkets were starting to ration key items.  In fact, my parents' neighbour kindly picked up some toilet rolls for them yesterday while he was doing his own shop - and the store manager was there in the aisles telling him he could only have that one pack...

Of course, some of the 'me-me-me' oiks won't like that.  OK, so call security and have them thrown out unceremoniously - with nothing.  Might make them think a bit if they have to do without.  Stupid, stupid >expletive deleted<.

Monic1511

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Several of these idiots have been arrested for breach of the peace but itís their kids I feel sorry for,

SteveX

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Talking to my mum several times today and we sadly decided it is not worth the risk for me to visit her tonight so right now I'm having a bit of a cry and wondering if I'll ever see my mum again.    >crying<
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auntieCtheM

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Oh Steve, you cannot think like that.  My own mother is now in a care home.  They are on lock-down so I cannot get to see her.  I just have to accept that that is how it is and get on with it.

Sunny Clouds

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Hugs to all those that have family they wish they could visit and can't.  It must be so difficult.

I've got a silly problem.  I've already mentioned compulsive handwashing.  It's actually a problem that varies because it used to be compulsive house cleaning alternating between barely doing any.

Ditto hoarding.  Well I did my hoarding ages ago for Brexit but shopping is what I do as a key activity, a bit here, a bit there.  How to stop it?  Aargh!

Well today, I did some shopping for neighbours, which helped, but also I went into a few shops, looked round and bought some stuff from the full bits of the shelves.

E.g. window cleaning wipes and stain remover pads.  If I'm not getting exercise and I want to divert my urge to clean away from excessive pointless handwashing, spring cleaning is the answer, and no one seems to want that sort of cleaning material.

In a supermarket, I looked round - what do others not want?  Ok, loads of stuff like stock powder and some brands of sauces for pasta & rice, buy a few items.  First aid section?  Hmm.  It's the paracetamol they want, not the sticking plasters, so buy some to put on my cracked hands.

Having stockpiled previously, I'm actually worried now because of the way I've stored stuff.  It's not in cupboards, it's in see-through plastic crates so it's visible through my kitchen window when the light's on after dark because there's no curtain (or curtain rail). 

Still, it will see me through and I'll have some spares for neighbours. 

I shouldn't be guilt-tripping because of my stockpiled stuff, even though I shouldn't because I bought a bit at a time over a period of over a year up to last year.

I'm worried about a couple in their eighties a couple of doors down.  They didn't answer the door when I rang the bell even though I then stood well back from the door so they could see me from the window if they looked.  I think tomorrow I'll put a note through the door.

Stay safe, everyone, and have some more hugs.

 >bighugs<  >bighugs<  >bighugs<  >bighugs<
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Sunshine

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>bighugs<

Steve. Auntie and anyone else here with living parents,

Both my parents died a long time ago so being away from them no longer stresses me out. I do remember what it was like not being able to see them and talk to them in person to see how they are. For me being sick and disabled made it harder because I could not just jump in the car, go and see my parents and resolve allsorts of things I knew would help them. I think having a cry and also accepting this new normal for now is the best we can do. 

I was listening to the radio earlier, there was an item about how food is being transported to the supermarkets and then it was reporting on how a bakery school was setting up a system by which bread would be distributed to the needy. I burst into tears, thinking so what am I going to do in the Great Corona Virus Crisis of 2020? Maybe I just needed to cry some of the stress and overloaded empathy levels out of me for a while. 

I do believe that injustice and the unfairness of the world we live in has mad some of us more sick and disabled than we would otherwise be. Maybe nature is teaching humanity a lesson it needs to learn.

>bighugs<

KizzyKazaer

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Sunny, you certainly should not feel in the slightest bit guilty about your 'stockpiling' - I wish some people could show your sort of consideration for others!

Quote
I think having a cry and also accepting this new normal for now is the best we can do.

Crying isn't something that comes easily to me, but have to say for the first time since this began, I woke up from an afternoon nap feeling quite down about it all - worried about Dad, really, as he has to cope with being Mum's 24/7 carer as well as the coronavirus stuff (she has advanced dementia).  At least we are fortunate enough to have phones and the Internet, I keep reminding myself - and there's lots of humour to be had online, apparently.  Dad finds some good satire to keep him smiling - such as the 'I've done my Christmas shopping already' skit which shows a chap proudly displaying his festive-wrapped... bog rolls!

I guess we have to find time and inclination for laughter as well as tears, anger, fear and all the other emotions we are likely to feel in these coming days/weeks/months/whatever.  For now, I'm going to blow a big >raspberry< at that damn virus...

JLR2

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Am I wrong to feel as I do in regards to my own Dad in that whilst he is over 85 now I find myself having little in the way of concern for him.

I'll explain, as a wee boy growing up I thought or saw my Dad in the mould of a James Bond like character, a big guy fit and healthy. Even today he still has a fair head of hair in that Bond quiff (if that's the right term) but as I myself have grown older and certainly since the passing of my Mother I have found myself realising the effort she put in to bring my brothers and sisters up. My Dad's weakness was, and still is, his love of gambling. My Mother was putting by any spare monies she could for things like Christmas and our birthdays often our birthday presents were funded through Embassy cigarette coupons. We had to do the hand me down routine and with me being the youngest son I got the shoes requiring the thicker cardboard insoles :-(  but we were sort of happy enough in our way. OK so I never owned or had a pair of decent trainers and had to do PE in my shoes or a pair of Wranglers/Levi's but there we go.

Since the passing of my Mother my Dad's more or less looked to my sister to look after him leaving the running of the house and any family related problems that came along such as my niece who's young daughter is unwell just now, paying bills and the like, to her. So long as he could either get to the bookies or get someone to put a bet on for him he was content. Even today as my sister looks after him in his isolation his main concern is getting someone to get a bet on for him. As it happens my sister has her own business to run, caring for her seriously disabled partner who thankfully lives in a flat in the same tenement building as my Dad, I can only hope all the work she has on her shoulders does not take its toll on her health. If things carry on as it appears they may do my sister is going to need professional help soon.

ally

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JLR2. Many men of your dads era grew up thinking that men had the right to keep so much of their wages behind, and, spend it on how they saw fit. Their wives were given a set amount of money to last until next pay day. These women had to eek out what they could afford to pay for food, clothing, rent, until the next pay day. To escape from the reality of their jobs, and, their lives in general, many men gambled, especially on horses.  In the hope of the big win that would change their lives for good.  Meanwhile, their families suffered, as the money was frittered away.

Men of this era usually saw their wives, as the little woman, who would cook, clean, look after the kids etc.  They didnít have much interaction with their children.  Therefore, due the culture of that time, many men,  were selfish. Your dad wonít change, itís too late for that now. All you can do is support your sister in some way.  She shouldnít risk her life, and, health to go outside to put bets on for your dad.  If she takes sick, her disabled partner, her business, and everything else. Will go up the creek due to your dads gambling obsession.

You need to look after yourself too.  Give advice to your sister by phone or email.  Donít visit. 

Take care of yourself, and, be safe.  That advice goes to everyone on this forum. Itís scary times right now.   It would be good if we could all pull together.  Voice our concerns, or, ask advice on this forum. I keep thinking Iím in some sort of Netflix horror film.  Unfortunately, I donít have brad Pitt, or, Daniel Craig to save me.  They wouldíve found a vaccine for the virus by now.  Boris, or, trump arenít the heros Iím looking for.

JLR2

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Ally, there is much in what you were saying there, I'll leave out contacting the family home in Glasgow for a while as I'm sure my sister will have enough on her hands just now.

I've plenty I can be doing at home just now, varnishing some shelves I put up in my kitchen and other wee jobs here I might even get around to actually tidy the place up a bit >biggrin<  I had a quick chat with my GP's surgery regarding the incident I had in Berlin and was told that they are only dealing with emergencies, so I don't know if there might have been anything more about what happened to me that I should be concerned about. When I spoke with my sister she felt I needed to ask if I may have experienced a minor stroke. As I didn't want to hold up other callers I just thanked the surgery and that was that end of call. I have Voltarol and will use that to ease the pain in my shoulder. Otherwise I'm feeling fine with my other health issues doing their usual thing, annoying me >lol<

I hope everyone else is keeping well and thank 'eaven that Sunshine's Ouch Too is here.

auntieCtheM

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Just idly wondering - will burglaries go down now>?

Monic1511

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JLR2 - in my area the bookies are shut along with the pubs so unless dad can do online betting he wont be placing any bets.

Burglaries - surely the burglars should be self isolating as well  >doh<

This is the DWP update on covid 19

Roundup of recent DWP announcements
 

Changes to jobcentre appointments and Universal Credit
 
People receiving benefits no longer need to attend jobcentre appointments.
 
People will continue to receive their benefits as normal, but all requirements to attend the jobcentre in person are suspended. These changes will be in place for 3 months from 19 March 2020.
 
Anyone already claiming Universal Credit who thinks they may have been affected by coronavirus, should contact their work coach using the
 
online journal, or
calling the Universal Credit helpline. 
 
On Friday the Chancellor announced that the standard rate in Universal Credit and tax credits will be increased by £20 a week for one year from 6 April.
 
People applying for Universal Credit, Employment Support Allowance or other benefits should not go to a jobcentre but apply for them online.

Suspension of face to face assessments for sickness and disability benefits
 
Face to face assessments for all sickness and disability benefits has been suspended.
 
This is being taken as a precautionary measure to protect vulnerable people from unnecessary risk of exposure to coronavirus.
 
We will ensure those who are entitled to a benefit continue to receive support, and that new claimants are able to access the safety net.
 
This affects claimants of Personal Independence Payment, those on Employment and Support Allowance and some on Universal Credit, as well as recipients of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit. These changes will be in place for 3 months from 17 March 2020.
 
The suspension of face-to-face assessments also covers new claims to those benefits.

£1bn package of additional support for renters
 
The Government has announced a package of measures to protect tenants and landlords affected by coronavirus. Renters will receive nearly £1bn additional support, through increases in the generosity of housing benefit and Universal Credit.
 
From April 2020, Local Housing Allowance rates will pay for at least 30% of market rents in each area.
 
Other measures to protect tenants and landlords include:
 
Emergency legislation to suspend new evictions from social or private rented accommodation while this national emergency is taking place.
No new possession proceedings through applications to the court to start during the crisis.
Landlords will also be protected by extending the three-month mortgage holiday to Buy to Let mortgages.
 
As a result, no renter in either social or private accommodation will be forced out of their home during this difficult time. 

link to the full newsletter http://news.dwp.gov.uk/dwplz/lz.aspx?p1=MS8DUxNzI5NFM2OTA0Ojk4RjQxREFEMjc0RjRDQzQ1RTI3NDVGRjAwNjA0NEJG-&CC=&p=0

SteveX

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Getting more scary by the minute isn't it?  jeez  >crying<

There's one thing though, with all the shops being forced to close, the DFS sale is finally over  >lol<
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Sunshine Meadows

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Monic,

Thank you for the information and link, I hope the DWP comes up with a way of fast tracking claims so the people without money get the help they need as soon as possible. 

Steve,

Your joke made me chuckle  >biggrin<