possible UNUM propaganda alert!

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Offworld

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possible UNUM propaganda alert!

  • on: 13 Dec 2011 04:25AM
Got an uneasy hunch about this one........

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2073334/Children-miss-lots-school-days-chronic-fatigue-syndrome.html
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"Although there is no cure for the disorder, supervised exercise and talking therapies can help overcome the debilitating symptoms."

Sunshine Meadows

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Re: possible UNUM propaganda alert!

  • on: 14 Dec 2011 04:23PM
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‘Children diagnosed through school-based clinics are less severely affected than those referred to specialist services and appear to make rapid progress when they access treatment.’

Previous estimates suggest prevalence of CFS/ME among children is between 0.1 per cent and 0.5 per cent, according to the researchers, who come from the Centre for Child and Adolescent Health in Bristol and the University of Bristol.

Dr Charles Shepherd, medical adviser to the ME Association, said: ‘We welcome the key messages to come out of this research because many children with ME/CFS are still having great difficulty in obtaining a diagnosis and as a result are not receiving the educational and social support that they require.’
 

I think providing more opportunity for diagnosis and treatment, in order to enable the children to keep up their education is a good thing. The difficulty comes if children get shouted at or called lazy but I also think just letting them stay in bed and not finding ways they can do small things day to day is equally as bad. When I was 14 + I missed heaps of school because as I grew my ability to walk crashed and also I was tired all the time. I severely regret the fact I lost out not just on my education but also on having friends and being able to socialise.

Even now I can find social situations difficult because I was not around people much, when I was younger or in fact at all.

Offworld

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Re: possible UNUM propaganda alert!

  • on: 14 Dec 2011 04:53PM
My concern (or suspicion) is towards there going to be a "Unum" sort of remedy soft-sell recommended, in tandem with a deliberate overloading in the numbers decreed to have "ME/CFS" such as to (deliberately) create public scepticism of the whole thing being down to anything other than delusion or laziness -- ie, Unum up to their old tricks but with a new twist ... their response and effective UK nullification of its recognition by the WHO etc.

Potential opportunity for IDS to yet again slime out the word "languishing".

xSparksx

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Re: possible UNUM propaganda alert!

  • on: 15 Dec 2011 02:04PM
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I think providing more opportunity for diagnosis and treatment, in order to enable the children to keep up their education is a good thing. The difficulty comes if children get shouted at or called lazy but I also think just letting them stay in bed and not finding ways they can do small things day to day is equally as bad. When I was 14 + I missed heaps of school because as I grew my ability to walk crashed and also I was tired all the time. I severely regret the fact I lost out not just on my education but also on having friends and being able to socialise.

Even now I can find social situations difficult because I was not around people much, when I was younger or in fact at all.

It can be quite harmful, though, to encourage children who have ME to keep doing things. I was diagnosed with depression aged 15, and obviously was encouraged to keep going to school, to try to have a social life, etc. Actually it turned out that I'd been getting iller and iller with ME from aged 11 (when I had influenza) and the depression was a product of my inability to keep up with everyone around me, and the way I was consistently underperforming at school because of brain fog. If the ME had been accurately diagnosed earlier (it was finally diagnosed when I was 18), one treatment option might have been to have a complete rest, to stop school entirely for a period, and to recover before continuing my education.

Hindsight's a wonderful thing, of course, but my mother always wonders if I'd still be as ill as I am now (housebound, basically) if I hadn't had to keep going through GCSEs and A levels. I did it on a reduced timetable, and did my A levels over three years, but I basically managed that by doing absolutely nothing else. I had no social life, I woke up, I went to school, I came home and did my homework and crashed into bed. I remained incredibly depressed until I left school, started with the Open University, and nurtured some wonderful online friendships (ie, ones where I can email and chat online, not have to actually see people!).

So more accurate diagnosing is good, but not if it just means kids are still forced to do things that are detrimental to their health. It's a question of working with each individual child to work out what they can manage, which will be different for every child.