Disabled people on benefits shouldn't have to fear being active

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Monic1511

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This may be a bit off topic but I don't understand how the public can applaud the paralympic participants yet any DLA claimant who does any physical task gets reported to the DWP for fraud - is it just me or are they being hypocritical again  >yikes<
Monic

seegee

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I don't think it's just you, Monic - many people still think "disabled" = "wheelchair", so if you don't use a wheelchair (all the time) you can't really be disabled.  >doh<

Hurtyback

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and if the paralympians can do the things they do, what excuse have the rest of us got for not working?...

sherbs

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Hmm

I'm not sure, I personally admire anyone with a disability who can become a paralympian.  They train hard, very hard for what they do, some with 3 limbs missing, brain damage, blind, etc.  Surely you cant deny anyone of these people some glory for what they do.

Monic1511

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Im not trying to deny them some glory I just wish the general public would recognise that just because you can go cannoing one day doesn't mean your able to function for the next 4 days.   A wheelchair basket ball player is always/normally going to be in a chair so that meets the "virtually unable to walk criteria for DLA" so you can claim DLA & be in a chair AND be a sportsperson.   Similarly the blind / visually impaired runners could get high rate mob just because they are visually impaired.

its the implication in the press that if you claim DLA you should not be able to take part in physical tasks.  That clip of the woman on a water slide is (imo) misleading, she could have been very disabled through a learning disability but that wouldn't stop you sliding down a water ramp, by showing that on the news the media seem to say that if you can do this and are getting benefits your a fraudster and that is just not true.

Hurtback even if we could all do some sort of work I've yet to meet the employer who would take us on.   I've had the "we don't take on people like you" from employers and "Why have you got a disabled bus pass, there's nothing (physically that I can see) wrong with you"  response "i have uncontrolled epilepsy and only 3/4 of my brain & Im not as stupid as you, whats your excuse?"   Same as my pal was stopped and asked why she had a blue badge, I had to interrupt as she had just finished her chemo for blood, bone, reproductive organs cancer and was wearing a wig.  Security guard was apologetic but that didn't help my pal on her first day out.   3 months later she was able to go sking but she is still due her DLA.

Sofie

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I don't think it's just you, Monic - many people still think "disabled" = "wheelchair", so if you don't use a wheelchair (all the time) you can't really be disabled.  >doh<

It's even worse when other disabled people do it and said disabled person isn't even a wheelchair user. >doh< (I think he sometimes uses one; but not that often) There does generally seem to be age related stuff too - too young to be disabled.

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I'm not sure, I personally admire anyone with a disability who can become a paralympian.  They train hard, very hard for what they do, some with 3 limbs missing, brain damage, blind, etc.  Surely you cant deny anyone of these people some glory for what they do.

Agreed

oldtone27

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Isn't this dichotomy a manifestation of the 'isn't he brave' syndrome. I'm not sure I can express my thoughts clearly but I think people can hold contradictory views without realising it. Some thoughts on possible perceptions:

The paralympians are seen as heroic overcoming their disabilities in a noble cause. I know they have intensive training schedules but how do they avoid being called for work. Does the DWP regard Olympic training an appropriate alternative? I'm not saying all paralympians are able to work but how is the distinction drawn?

The bloke down the road who struggles out of his wheelchair occasionally is treated as a nobody, probably a fraud. He may well be able to work if he had suitable conditions and an adaptable employer but that would not be considered. He may not be able to work but because he doesn't always look helpless then he's fair game.

sherbs

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Oldtone

I hear what you are saying, but how do we know that the paralympians dont work, or how do we know that they claim DLA, i really dont think another disabled person should be asking another disabled person that question, just my opinion.  I am disabled and work, and claim DLA.

hossylass

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I dont think its about DLA, to be a paralympian you have to have a grading, and that grading would identify a disability that could cause you additional costs and identify additional needs.

But being a paralympian would suggest that you have sufficient functionality to be able to work, excepting again those who have the most serious disabilities.

I am no expert on all the sports but I believe our best female paralympic archer is actually now on the olympic team.
All the paralympic riders have physical impairments only, MS, CP and that long thing that Lee has(!), but some are quite high up the scale of affecting functionality.

Like real life, disability is from minor to major, but is grouped in graded steps.
I have suggested that DLA is structured in a similar manner...

Some of the riders are sponsored, Lee has sponsors and British funding and runs his own horse related business.


sherbs

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Thanks Hossy, I understand there are differing levels of grading for paralympians, i think i was responding to monics post, where it was said something about paralympians and DLA, its all gone a bit off topic now, so i wont post anymore on this subject   :-)

oldtone27

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I hear what you are saying, but how do we know that the paralympians don't work, or how do we know that they claim DLA,

We don't on either count, but that's the point. The general readership don't consider these points either. Just Olympians are hero other disabled people potential scroungers.

This thread started about disabled people in fear of being active. Given the snitch mentality being promoted by this government I was wondering just how real this fear is? How active can one be before ones benefits are at threat.

Taking the argument further doesn't this disincentivise a disabled person from being more active if they can. This is an issue.

I remember an article many years ago about a young lad who lost a leg to cancer. He received some disability benefit (don't know which) but he was spotted playing one-legged football and it was stopped. The article was complaining about this as he still had mobility difficulties but could take part in a short burst of activity but paid for it in pain later. Don't what the outcome was.

hossylass

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Well I am very disincentivised, but that may be because I really want to do more, but dare not.

Some people may not actually want to do anything, and some, amazingly, refuse to do any incase it improves their state of being, allegedly... these opinions I gleaned from reading the comments of the Physios who believe that gym'll fix it, even incurable genetic conditions, but the same applies to people who "refuse" CBT when we all know that the government consider it the cure for ME, CFS, FMS, and a variety of other conditions.

I must admit I feel damned if I do, and damned if I dont. :(