Latest data release for the Work Capability Assessment

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devine63

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Hi Seegee

Yes indeed I was hoping my earlier post might be helpful to others as well as yourself - getting a neuropsychological assessment is a potential strategy for anyone who has ANY form of cognitive impairment (e.g. problems with memory, attention, language, etc.).

I'm delighted to hear your Job Centre Plus team were so on the ball - that is literally the first time I have heard a positive comment about them!  (Though to be fair, I have not been looking for such comments)

I'm also pleased to hear how helpful your BASIC centre have been too,
regards, Deb

Sunshine Meadows

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No it does not mean this, it means that the goal post were moved and the goal made significantly smaller.    The real question is how many are now in FULL time employment... thats a figure we don't get.

Pyrotech,

I was thinking of something similar.

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/newsroom/press-releases/2012/apr-2012/dwp042-12.shtml


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Employment Minister Chris Grayling said:

    "Our reforms are built around the simple premise; we want to look at your potential to work not just your limitations. For too long people were left with no support sitting at home on benefits. It is clear that the majority of new claimants to sickness benefits are in fact able to do some work.

    “For those who need additional support getting into work, the Work Programme provides tailored support to help overcome whatever barriers they may face.”

 >headbang<

seegee

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JC+ staff knew I have intermittent depression; I think that's why the front-desk staff originally referred me to a DEA, to see if she could discourage me from repeatedly trying nearly-full-time work which seemed to be making me ill. 
She asked for a medical history (including hospital admissions) and made a connection, then arranged assessment by an "employment psychologist"; they said "probable brain injury, refer to specialist provider"...  and that is how the system is supposed to work.
The specialist provider wrote all the things they have to write after my attendances there such as the possibility of perhaps building towards work of more than 16 hours over time, but they also made it quite clear that I have a brain injury and it's not going to disappear but will have lifelong effects; also that I was participating to the best of my ability and clearly willing to work.  I was very glad to get some idea of what was happening, as I'd been very confused and distressed at being unable to cope with things that used to be so easy (like shiftwork/ long hours/ learning new things).

BASIC www.basiccharity.org.uk are still helping now - don't think I'm likely to stop going there anytime soon.  (I keep posting their site because they run a helpline for anyone with a brain or spinal injury/ their families, etc.)

seegee

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I should have said that BASIC are not the work preparation provider I was sent to; nothing against the provider, they were pleasant and helpful (gave me lots of good info and suggestions), just wouldn't want anyone avoiding BASIC thinking they are so entangled with DWP.