Is it really necessary for the papers to publicise this?

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devine63

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Hi Otter

yes it is quite likely there is some underlying medical problem - possibly not yet diagnosed.   However not everyone who reaches a super-morbid weight level has the kinds of illnesses one would expect - e.g. at least one of the women featured in one of the "freak show" style documentaries is hugely overweight and unable to get out of bed - yet she is not a type 2 diabetic (which is usually the minimum one would expect by way of diagnoses).
regards, Deb

boccius

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Not 100% sure about the 'underlying medical problem'. An article in The Guardian a couple of days ago told of the mayor of New York who was trying to ban giant 'cups' (buckets, we'd call them) of 'soft' drinks like coca cola from cinemas and the like.

He allowed 500ml buckets (that's a sodding pint!), but the ones he was trying to ban were 2 LITRE BUCKETS. Point being, of course, that a society that has so far seen nothing wrong in giving a kid a half-gallon fix of sugary cola might carry some of the blame for the fatness of kids. And it isn't, of course, just in The Land of the Free (where nothing is), but here as well.


A.

lankou

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He allowed 500ml buckets (that's a sodding pint!),

No it isn't, a pint is 568ml.

hossylass

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I didn't realise that 500ml is just under a pint.

Wow, that seems a lot when you look at it that way,  being of that horrible generation that learned imperial and then got metric foisted on us, and subsequently has no idea of either :(

KizzyKazaer

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'A pint? That's almost an armful!!'

Couldn't resist ..

I am one of that generation who had to adjust to metric, and still I can't visualise amounts/distances/weights etc in anything other than 'old money' - but I know that a litre of milk is less than 2 pints, yet in some shops gets charged the same price as >angry<

Out of interest, I was reading the Daily Mail comments on this story - and anyone seen to be 'defending' the girl in any way (including the suggestion that there must be some underlying condition that contributed to her obesity) has been 'red-arrowed' to death  >erm<

devine63

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Yes of course it is foolish for anyone to drink those kinds of quantities of sugary soft drinks - the number of calories alone gives one a clear idea of that - most soft drinks contain about 6 teaspoons of sugar per glass.   But did you know that now they think the "diet" versions are just as bad for people?    I don't know the details, but something about the body reacting as if the drink contained sugar when it does not.
regards, Deb

Gravity

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^ Sweeteners bind to the same receptors as sugars, hence the similar taste. It doesn't just happen in the mouth though, also the small intestine, so the body reacts as if it's consuming lots of lovely sugar, which it's not. Then you start to crave sugar and carbs to redress the balance. So if an individual has a problem with overeating they're probably better off drinking the full-sugar version, as it'll have fewer knock-on effects. Though even better drinking water.
That's not to mention that certain sweeteners have been associated with cancers and so on. I always feel you're much better off consuming glucose than aspartame. (Not that this has any bearing on my diet coke habit.)

It's worth noting that there is some degree of noise in the statistics re: diet drinks and obesity. People drink diet drinks as an easy method of keeping down the calories, because they need to do so. At the same time, they're taking in too many calories from other sources.


bulekingfisher

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Hello Otter

Is this paper conected to HANSEL +GRETAL  fairy storys because it is cheap + hurtfull sensationalism where profit comes before truth

devine63

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thanks Gravity, I like to understand the physiology.   As I recall the cancer risk was only apparent when the lab rats or mice ate several times their own bodyweight of the sweetener?

is it true that the blood sugar level rises as much after drinking a diet version as it does after drinking the sugared version (or as my son calls it, "full fat")?
regards, Deb

Gravity

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You are right. The cancer risk is fairly slim (neglible). Regardless, I'd rather consume glucose than aspartame. Glucose is pretty essential in our diet, it's something our body deals in and knows how to deal with. Sweeteners and stuff? Less so. Not that I consider them any huge danger, but certainly not healthier.

I believe, though I haven't looked into it in great detail, that the confusion of sweetener intake causes insulin to be released, as the body expects blood glucose to rise. Then blood glucose drops... and glycogen stores are converted to glucose to fix it...The nature of a negatve feedback loop being that it will overshoot a bit, then be regulated down, and eventually, some hours after your sugar-free alternative, your blood glucose levels return to normal... And I think that right there is a route to type 2 diabetes.

devine63

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Hi

well the diet drinks might be involved int he development of insulin resistance then - but that doesn't always turn into type 2 diabetes, so it's not that straightforward.   But certainly either large amounts of glucose or of sweeteners are not good for us!
regards, Deb


oldtone27

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I'm not sure of the merits of sweeteners over sugar, but one thing I do know is that most sweeteners leave a nasty oily aftertaste in my mouth. For that reason alone I avoid diet drinks.

It is difficult because they are often present in ordinary 'sugared' drinks but I think the sugar masks the effect. I do however try not to drink too many sugary drinks although I am partial to 'cloudy lemonade'.