Author Topic: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority  (Read 4558 times)

oldtone27

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #15 on: 14 Nov 2012 12:38PM »
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Not everybody has a mummy and daddy who can afford a large house with empty bedrooms ...

No, but most of the government Ministers and senior opposition do. So no understanding there then!

Force_Majeure

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #16 on: 14 Nov 2012 05:52PM »
My husband told me some 10 years ago that the Tories want things to go back like Victorian days, with tenement type accommodation, and I thought he was talking out his b*tt! But now it is unfolding right before our eyes, he was right.

What happened to Nick Clegg?  He promised to support the vulnerable and needy. But then he joined forces with the Tories. ConDem's have condemned us all.
Expect the worst and hope for the best!!!  :)

Mabelcat

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #17 on: 14 Nov 2012 11:00PM »
Well I don't know if I would have counted as deserving but being allocated a council flat five years ago has transformed my life.  At forty four it gave me my first truly permanent home after years of private renting and the feelings of security that gives me are priceless. 

In addition, as the rent is affordable, I can afford to work part time which would have been impossible in my previous accommodation.  Whilst I would love to be able to work full time it is neither realistic nor sustainable given my various health issues but the choice in private rented was benefits or full time which is barmy really.  Mind you I would have lost out on the housing benefit because I had a minute second bedroom.  I have actually been wondering how they define a 'spare bedroom' and whether if they penalise people who have a second reception room as well.  In my flat I have a very small second bedroom next to the kitchen.  If I said it was the dining room would they believe me.  I must find out.

Anyway, that's by the by.  I just think the dialogue about 'deserving' and 'non-deserving' is just awful and reminiscent of The nineteenth century Poor Law.  To claim that vast numbers of young women are getting pregnant just to be housed is a gross oversimplification of the complex reasons for high rates of teen pregnancy and in any case if we penalise the mothers as non-deserving we are also penalising the children which is just wrong.

I think similar factors apply to other 'non-deserving groups.  It's very hard to be a model citizen if you are homeless or have insecure accommodation.

devine63

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #18 on: 15 Nov 2012 01:20AM »
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    "Not everybody has a mummy and daddy who can afford a large house with empty bedrooms ..."


"No, but most of the government Ministers and senior opposition do. So no understanding there then!"

Glad my point came across clearly Old Tone!
regards, deb

Fiz

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #19 on: 15 Nov 2012 02:17AM »
Here in my LA no homeless people have gained social housing for years. They are found accommodation, typically single people and parents with young children go into 'temporary' hostels/B&B/shared accommodation and families with older children or vulnerable people are found private rented where the council rents from the owner and the tenants then rent from the council under a normal assured tenancy that they would have got through an agent. The advantages of renting private accommodation via the council is no deposits are needed in advance, the council maintain the properties so you know any faults will be repaired and there are no ongoing extortionate agency fees with each 'tenancy' renewal. It does mean that people won't deliberately make themselves intentionally unomtentionally homeless, though the temporary accommdation they sometimes use for young families is not good. That means the housing list is always allocated according to the set priorities. The council has just announced changes from January 1st saying 10-20% of the vacancies will now go to people where there is employment. I'm not sure how that will be implimented, we'll see. I'm not sure what it is supposed to achieve either, as said here it would appear that it is the deserving v the undeserving and takes no account as to the reasons for not being in employment. It is a slippery slope.

sickandtired

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #20 on: 15 Nov 2012 08:22PM »
"Vulnerable homeless families will be rehoused in the private rented sector, often many miles from where they live, to free up social homes for so-called "priority" households, according to a government document presented to councils this week and seen by the Guardian."

So let's see...the 'less-deserving' families, which judging from this article are the ones without jobs, with a reputation for getting into arrears with their rent, or being antisocial ('in need of training to be good tenants') are to be shown to private landlords and asked, "Can you take this little lot off our hands, please?"

Do people in this government have no experience of private landlords (except being private landlords themselves?)

I've got lots of experience, and I can tell you, it's virtually impossible to get one to rent you a place unless you fit the bill exactly with them. I remember showing landlords my degree certificate and really good references from two university heads of department, but it cut no ice at all with them, just because I didn't have a job. In desperation, I finally told them I was self-employed (so no checking with employers), but I was told, "I don't like taking on self-employed people because their income isn't steady enough".

These are the people the government are expecting to take on their 'less deserving' tenants.

When the Coalition finally breaks up, I wonder which party will get custody of the brain cell?

auntieCtheM

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #21 on: 19 Nov 2012 05:29PM »
"In my flat I have a very small second bedroom next to the kitchen. "

That sounds like a dining room or a prayer room.  Do you have lots of specialist equipment you need to store?  or maybe you have your washing machine and airer in there.

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #22 on: 19 Nov 2012 06:11PM »
When the Coalition finally breaks up, I wonder which party will get custody of the brain cell?

They have a whole brain cell? >yikes<

Prabhakari

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #23 on: 20 Nov 2012 09:09AM »
The brain cell is run by the independent cell inside it. The one that ensures the cell gets nourishment. It is thinking of moving on, finding dolphins more appealing.
Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.

Dic Penderyn

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #24 on: 20 Nov 2012 12:00PM »
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They have a whole brain cell?

Yes but they never use it.  >biggrin<
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

Mabelcat

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Re: 'Deserving' families to get council housing priority
« Reply #25 on: 20 Nov 2012 09:26PM »
"In my flat I have a very small second bedroom next to the kitchen. "

That sounds like a dining room or a prayer room.  Do you have lots of specialist equipment you need to store?  or maybe you have your washing machine and airer in there.

If I have to stop work which is not unlikely given my health issues, the room will probably have to have a personality change.  At the moment it is more of a dumping ground than a bedroom.  I'm not sure if that would help my case.