"death by accidental adverse healthcare"

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devine63

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Hi

quite apart from the ruin they made of this particular lady's surgery, even when it goes right the surgery means you can never eat normally again, at a minimum people post surgery have to spend all their time worrying about how to cram the right nutrients and enough calories into a small enough volume of food  - and that's if nothing goes wrong!!!!

regards, Deb

Sunshine Meadows

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I agree that BMI does not show a true picture of the level of a person's health and so should only be used as a guide.

Anyone who watches the Supersize Superskinny program on Channel 4 will see that a bad diet is a bad diet and that is what needs changing.

I recently saw some a of tv program called something like Fat and Proud and the right to be fat argument went too far because it failed to address the way being overweight can itself be disabling.

Some people can't help being overweight (or too skinny) and no one should be bullied or mistreated because of how they look but at the same time people who can make changes themselves should be encouraged to do so.

There is a place for bariatric surgery if the patient is unable to get out of bed, shower, or do ordinary day to day tasks because they are simply carrying too much excess weight.

Dic Penderyn

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Quote
There is a place for bariatric surgery if the patient is unable to get out of bed, shower, or do ordinary day to day tasks because they are simply carrying too much excess weight.

None of those things applied in this ladies case it would seem.
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

devine63

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Hi

I disagree Sunshine - I would argue there is only a case for bariatric surgery if it can be shown to be an effective and appropriate treatment [the evidence is lacking, so far] and it can be applied in an ethical manner. 

e.g.  my BMI is high enough that I have had bariatric surgery offered to me by a doctor who had met me less than 60 seconds earlier (and I was not consulting him about anything remotely related to my weight) and who knew absolutely nothing whatsoever about me or my medical history - so he had absolutely no idea whether or not i might be an appropriate candidate for such surgery.

e.g. 2:  I have also heard of obese people being told "you're not fat enough yet for bariatric surgery" ... so guess what they did?  Yes, you have it - they went out and deliberately put on more weight in order to get the surgery ...  does that seem like ethical practice to you?

regards, Deb