Barber with a megaphone warned motorists about traffic wardens.

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AccessOfficer

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A barber who used a megaphone to warn motorists of traffic wardens near his shop in Liskeard, Cornwall has been silenced after being put on a council "Blacklist."

Andy Blackwell was popular with those he saved from a possible parking fine. But he says that after issuing one of his warning cries recently, two "Angry" wardens confronted him and he was later visited by police.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2270242/Blacklisted-council-barber-megaphone-warned-motorists-traffic-wardens.html#ixzz2JRzudLQf

Regards
AO

ATurtle

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Typical Daily Fail "Male-chicken-up" third bullet point in the heading:  "To protect staff form potentially 'harmful situations", surey that should be FROM!
Tony.

"I choose not to place "DIS", in my ability." - Robert M. Hensel

boccius

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I used to work on a small factory estate, and from my window could see the local traffic warden creeping up the hill to nab workers hard at it in the factories.

I had a referee's whistle, and I used to run out into the street and blow it as hard as I could, which was followed 30 seconds later by a Le Mans-type start as dozens of workers rushed out to move their motors.

Funnily enough, after a few months of that treatment, they stopped coming round our (totally un-residential) cul-de-sac. Victory.

A

Yvette

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Good for you Boccius.   >thumbsup<

Sunny Clouds

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I get so hacked off with people parking illegally. 

I hate sitting on buses that have to wait to pull out from the bus lane because parked cars have blocked it, or having to wait for the next stop to get off because someone's parked too close to the bus stop for the bus to be able to pull in so I can't get my trolley off. 

I hate it when my father calls a taxi and it can't reverse up his drive to pick him up because some pain-in-the neck has parked part-way across the dropped kerb.  I hate it when people without blue badges take up all the available slots next to shops.  I hate it when I'm on a bus or in a taxi and all the traffic grinds to a halt and has to shuffle in and out because people have parked on the yellow lines leaving only one vehicle's width down a two-way street.

I hate it when a vehicle I'm in can't get anywhere because someone's parked where they're obstructing access for large vehicles like lorries so we all have to wait while the lorry driver goes round trying to find out whose car it is.  I've been stuck over half an hour like that before now.

I managed to drive for decades without feeling the urge to park illegally.

If there are parking restrictions, people who can't walk or can't walk far can use their blue badges and the rest of us can park at a distance and use Shank's pony.  I'm amazed how many people aren't prepared to park and walk.

If you don't think the local parking arrangements are appropriate, lobby your councillor, but have a thought for all of us that would like to get to where we're going if only people wouldn't park where they're not supposed to.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

seegee

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I get irritated with drivers parking on double-yellow lines; I'm a pedestrian & can see over most cars but other drivers approaching the junction can't - that's why the lines are there, stupid! >doh<
Some people think it's better to park on the pavement instead if there are lines on the road (and some do it when there aren't, to be closer to the house they want) - that's pretty irritating too, footpaths are not for cars/ vans and they block the passage of those who are meant to use the pavements.  :-(
Some park half on the road (on double-yellows), half on the pavement, presumably in order to annoy as many people as possible. >steam<

boccius

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Yes, some drivers behave badly, both when driving and parking.

But don't let's pretend that traffic wardens are White Knights marching around righting the wrongs of beleaguered pedestrians - not round here they're not. The council use them to generate revenue. That's why in our old factory estate - hundreds of yards away from any residential areas, or shops, or anything similar - they used to come daily and try to give the badly-paid factory workers 30 tickets. I once tackled a warden who said, with a straight face, 'Yes, but what would happen if a woman with a pram tried to come along the pavement.' I said, well, she would be lost, wouldn't she.

And round here, outside our flats in a residential cul-de-sac, they tried to put double-yellow lines down one side of the road (spurious reason: so emergency vehicles wouldn't have trouble driving along the road - in 32 years, I'd never seen an emergency vehicle having any trouble...) The result would have been chaos, as dozens of flat-dwellers would have had nowhere to put their cars. Luckily, the council backed down at the time, but you really have to watch them!

A

seegee

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Wasn't defending traffic wardens, I didn't comment on them.  I agree they shouldn't be in places like industrial estates unless the council has been receiving complaints of blocked thoroughfare.  Actually I'm not sure the council have any right to fine people for parking "offences" on private land anyway - are access roads within most industrial estates part of the public roads or are they privately owned?  If they are private land councils should tell landowner to put up signs then employ people themselves to attempt enforcement.  They could offer to have traffic wardens do it at a price per year to the landowner & use any money raised to repair potholes in the actual highway. >whistle<

I do think ordinary police officers and PCSOs should be giving parking fines to motorists who park illegally on the public highway though (that does include pavements in residential & shopping streets, as well as on country lanes where cars travel fast & walking in the road can be risky); they must frequently see vehicles on pavements/ double-yellows but ignore it. 

Most motorists are sensible, considerate & don't park in stupid places but increasing numbers appear to think it's fine to park on the pavement because it's not impeding traffic flow on the road - no thought for people who use the pavements & no recollection of what the highway code has to say...
218. Do not park partially or wholly on the pavement unless signs permit it. Parking on the pavement can obstruct and seriously inconvenience pedestrians, people in wheelchairs, the visually impaired and people with prams or pushchairs.
I've made the first words bold rather than all uppercase to prevent it yelling at VI members.  Otherwise it's a direct quote from the little book that all drivers should know well before they receive a full licence. 

boccius

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Not everything is as black and white as we'd like, is it.

We live in a cul-de-sac, and our flat is at a 'pinch-point' where for no good reason the roadway narrows considerably. Thus, parking correctly on either side of the road, tyre an inch from the kerb, causes other vehicles, particularly larger ones, to slow down - and in the case of dust-carts, stops them getting through.

So we adopted the system of parking with our back and front tyres on the kerbstone - not the grass, not the pavement, just the kerbstone. And by parking those 12 inches further in, all vehicles, even dust-carts, could sail through.

Result? Congratulations? Not as such. A 60 fine from Brent Council for 'parking on the pavement', following to the letter that paragraph you quoted from the Highway Code.

I would much rather our streets were patrolled by intelligent police officers than the local council's merry men, (actually employed by private firms round here), who never exercise discretion, and earn bonuses for every 'criminal' they nick.

A

Sunny Clouds

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Here's my problem, and I hope you'll forgive a general observation to begin with.

As a young woman youth hostelling round Europe and Scandinavia, I noticed that there were countries where people obeyed the letter of the law, waiting patiently at pedestrian crossings for the pedestrian light had turned green before crossing an empty road.  There were countries where motorists didn't stop for anyone who didn't actually leap out in front of them, regardless of the colour of the lights, so the pedestrians also ignored the lights and flung themselves out into the path of traffic. 

And there's the UK, where cars dash through lights just as they're changing, where they drive 10mph above the speed limit, where they don't wait for the pedestrians to be fully off crossings before pulling away, but do let them get past.

We don't obey rules slavishly or recklessly break rules, we bend rules.

Except that increasingly we don't.  Our society has functioned nicely for a long time bending rules, but there are enough people around taking advantage of that to break them to make it ever nearer to impossible to keep working on the bending the rules approach.

The big bee in my bonnet since I started looking after Dad is parking on the pavement.  The road I walk up and down every day is one that I grew up in, one that I walked up to see my parents later in life, one that I walked along on my evening walks, one that I've lived in.  I've known that road for over half a century.

Time was when there was little traffic and the cars that people did have were parked in people's drives.

People got more cars and parked some in the street and more cars came up and down the road.

Eventually, people got a bit anxious about their cars and parked slightly on the pavement.

Then they parked further.  Some now even park across the pavement, the front of the car in their drive and the back end sticking out, expecting people to go in the road to get past.

I have to go out in the road to get past at least one car most days.

Recently, I caught a problematic car-owner outside his house.  I explained about how I go up and down the road every day looking after my elderly father with dementia and how I have to go out into the road to get past his car.  I said sometimes I only have to go out in the road carrying stuff but other days I can't even get past without carrying stuff.  I pointed out that my father can't get past because he needs space for his walking stick.

The owner said his car could get scratched by other cars coming past because there were cars parked opposite as well.  There are never many cars opposite, so I suggested he park opposite, leaving a good width of road.  No.  Well, what about trimming his hedge?  He could easily take 10 inches or more off the side without harming it.  Maybe in the spring.  (I.e. never.)  I asked whether the risk of his car being scratched and his desire not to have to park more than two yards from his front drive was more important than the risk of a pedestrian being run over.  He thought it was.

But this started with people parking slightly on the kerb.

So we're back to the problem of people going from bending rules to breaking them.  Some of us hanker back to the days of reasonableness and common sense over such things, but it isn't there, so the only way we can stay safe is to set the boundaries and stick to them.

Meanwhile the road I'm in lies outside council parking control, the beat sergeant responded to an email from my councillor with a rant about not being able to get his double buggy down the pavement (I have this lovely mental image of a baby buggy with flashing lights!) He said he'd tell his officers to do something about it.  Nothing happened for ages, now mostly I can get down the pavement.

And yes, we're left with people parking a bit on the pavement and mostly that's ok, but if only we could rely on everyone to do that whilst letting the beat sergeant get his double buggy through, my neighbour get his guide dog through and my dad get through with his walking stick at an angle.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

seegee

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Yes, it's silly to ticket someone who isn't impeding traffic flow on the road or passage down the pavement. 
I believe (have been told by several drivers) that this is a fairly recent development in most places (maybe it hardly ever happened until the past few years?  There were fewer vehicles on the road of course.).  There seem to be a couple of reasons for this...
Many councils no longer employ traffic wardens who are paid a weekly wage/ monthly salary; workers are employed by private companies who offer bonuses for the number of tickets issued (on top of a normal pay that isn't really enough to live on, so they have to ticket more vehicles).  Most councils have had reductions in money from central government, but they do get to keep money collected from parking tickets - so they don't discourage this don't-issue-a-warning, ticket-first policy.

Traffic wardens have no business down a residential cul-de-sac unless residents have been complaining that they/ their visitors can't get past due to vehicles parked so they are blocking either road or pavement (or that non-residents are parking in a residents-only zone). 

It is a small minority of drivers (wild guess 1/100, maybe fewer) who park so they are blocking the way or impeding other motorists' view; that wasn't a problem 40 years ago when there were fewer cars but it often is now, as Sunny Clouds demonstrated above. >dove<

auntieCtheM

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I've got some sticky labels that can be stuck onto cars that park over the pavement.  I have only used it a couple of times, but when I stuck one on a car a few houses away it did stop them.  I forget where the labels come from - someone on Ouch posted the details a few years ago.