Eating well for less!

  • 12 Replies
  • 3067 Views

Otter

  • *
  • Charter Member and Volunteer
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1428

Eating well for less!

  • on: 01 Feb 2013 02:46PM
(sorry if this is in the wrong place, wasn't sure where to put it)

The basis of this is from the Canned Food Advisory Bureau founded in 1937 about having a reserve of food if you canít get out buy or afford fresh, or supplies dry up (they were preparing for war). Canned food is cheaper than frozen. There are people who have a store cupboard which they can raid in emergencies and thatís great but you have more income than I do; my current situation and childhood have left me with a rabid fear of empty food cupboards so having a few tins in there helps psychologically  >hugs<.

Through and trial and error and using this through the winter for the last 6 years when fruit and veg are even expensive in markets I have come to the following requirements for food to last a month. Which is slightly more numerous than the CFAB recommends but cans are now smaller, with some additions/missings due to changes in eating habits (cans of suet anybody?).

When buying at supermarkets go for store own brands (thereís a danger with non-store value brands that the contents are inedible).

The thing about canned food is that its sell by date can be up to 12years away though 2 to 3 years is more usual, so if you donít use it straight away there is no stress it will go off

One month for one adult over 12 years (half for kids)
8 thick soups/16 cuppa soups, 8 tins fish, 7 tins meat, 28 tins vegetables, 7 tins fruit, 7 tins pudding (can be custard, jellies, heritage puds or about 22 yogurts), 14 tins evap/condensed milk, condiments Ė salt, pepper, brown and red sauce, salad cream, Worcester sauce (lasts along time), mustard, pickle, jam, marmalade, curry powder, stock cubes/powder, 3lb butter (cheaper than marg), 100g coffee, 600g cheese, 500ml cooking oil.

Vegan list Ė 8 thick soups/16  cuppa soups, 20 assorted tins of lentils, pulses, chick peas, beans, 28 tins vegetables, 14 tins fruit, 4 litres longlife soya or rice milk, vegan varieties of condiments above, 100g coffee, 500ml cooking oil

Auto-immune disease no trigger list (no gluten, dairy, eggs, nuts, soya or shell fish), 16 cuppa soups- vegan rice milk based non gluten and bought from ethnic shop cheaply, 8 tins fish (not shellfish), 7 tins meat, 28 tins vegetables, 14 tins fruit, 4 litres 100% fruit juice, vegan non soya, non gluten varieties of condiments above, 5 assorted tins of pulses, lentils, chick peas and beans, 100g coffee, 500ml cooking oil

They also recommended a supply of dry goods Ė tea, sugar, flour and cereals

Sainsburyís value own brand tea is really good, but I wouldnít recommend the others. Sugar cubes work out cheaper in the long run as you donít over use them. Flour would have been for baking and cereals for breakfast. They also recommended potatoes which werenít rationed the staple for meals and I also use rice as I find potatoes which are cheaper in bulk, start sprouting on you as you canít eat them fast enough. With rice buy bulk; itís much cheaper and it doesnít go off.

Also if you can buy cheap dried fruit to supplement your diet do, it weighs 2.5 times less than it would fresh and costs about that too. Canned fruit and veg does have a good vitamin content if in own juice or water, the preservation however, as does freezing does something to the vitamin content overall which drying doesnít.

My biggest problem is getting it home so I buy it in regularly in smaller quantities.

I follow the Auto-immune no trigger list and supplement with rice as staple, sometimes potatoes and buy cheap rice cakes which I have with something sweet on for breakfast Ė its currently costing me £54 per month max, so £1.80 a day and thatís before I find the buy one get one frees - just check or ask someone else to check the best before dates.

The other thing is if you have no food issues and are quick  >run<, discrete, check dates and avoid shellfish and eggs and donít mind being sworn at; supermarket bin diving for bashed/ squashed packaged goods is seriously economical  >biggrin<



KizzyKazaer

  • *
  • Global Moderator
  • Super Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8793

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 01 Feb 2013 08:20PM
Thanks for posting this, Otter - I don't see why it shouldn't remain here for the time being, it's all very useful information for people living on tight budgets  >thumbsup<

devine63

  • *
  • Guest

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 03 Feb 2013 01:08AM
hi

just thought we should mention: do not buy dented tins if planning to store for long term, it's risky healthwise, but undented tins are great for long term,

the cheapest breakfast cereal by far is porridge and it's warm and filling - not readibrek type which is too finely milled.  get an ordinary bag of rolled oats (I don't like the higher quality versions, basic store's own are great).    if you can't have dairy make it with all water.   making very easy: one cup of oats into a large bowl add one and a half cups of milk+water i find half and half about right, but can be any mix you like.   stir thoroughly and microwave for 3 mins; stir thoroughly; microwave 1 min; stir thoroughly; microwave 1 min stir again.    if that's not thick enough, leave to stand 1-2 mins then stir and microwave 1 more minute.   once all thick and ready to go, put in serving bowl, add a splash of cold milk and either sugar or salt to your taste.

a good store cupboard staple is the "country soup mix" or "stew mix" you will find with the dried lentils etc in the supermarket - either one contains a mix of dried pulses and veg which is great for adding to soups and stews - just pour in half a cupful to a cupful when you add the stock - might need a bit of extra liquid, but good for thickening and adds fibre so makes the soup/stew more filling.

another cheap option is using up the last veg in the fridge to make a tasty veg soup - really easy as you basically chop everything up to small pieces and fry a few onions in minimal oil til transparent, start putting in the veg and add enough stock (made from a cube is fine) to cover everything plus at least a finger's width.   bring to the boil then simmer til everything is cooked, season to your taste.   if you like your soup thick, include a couple of potatoes cut into small cubes.
regards, Deb
 

NeuralgicNeurotic

  • *
  • Charter Member and Volunteer
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7373

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 03 Feb 2013 10:14AM
I'm experimenting with a Potato Bag to see if it might help prevent sprouting (although, sprouted or not, I just eat the darn things - provided they aren't green, they're fine). I shall let you know how it goes.

ditchdwellers

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3010

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 03 Feb 2013 10:32AM
I save any left over veg from cooking, even if its just a small potato, put them in the freezer and then when I have enough I make a big pot of mixed veg soup.  Lovely and tasty and nothing goes to waste!

CassInGreen

  • *
  • Guest

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 15 Feb 2013 11:23AM
What is it about dented cans that are supposed to be a health risk?  I thought that scare went out of fashion in the 1980s?!

I eat loads of porridge it's all I ever eat for breakfast.  Also I don't know if anyone has noticed but in asda late at night they out cheap food at the front of the store and sometimes you can get things like a whole bag of courgettes for 2p or something.  I would also suggest making your own bread, it's far cheaper.

lankou

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2952

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 15 Feb 2013 11:41AM
What is it about dented cans that are supposed to be a health risk?

A dent can split the tinplating on the inside of a steel can letting corrosion/chemical reactions happen with the contents.

CassInGreen

  • *
  • Guest

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 15 Feb 2013 02:29PM
What is it about dented cans that are supposed to be a health risk?

A dent can split the tinplating on the inside of a steel can letting corrosion/chemical reactions happen with the contents.

Like I said that health scare went out of fashion in the 1980s... haven't you heard of the latest one?  Mushrooms are carcinogenic!  >yikes<

sherbs

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1334

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 15 Feb 2013 08:37PM
I tend to buy fresh milk, the little plastic bottles, i think they are 500ml and freeze them,

i also buy brown bread on offer and freeze it, as i live on my own i would not eat a whole loaf of bread in the week so i freeze the bread straight away, and just pull out 2 slices at a time as i go along,

I also freeze rolls and recently the muffins at local supermarket ( i shop online) have been buy one get one free so i have been freezing the muffins and take one out as and when needed. ( a lovely treat with a cup of coffee (also on offer)

Does anyone else have any sugestiions as to what fresh food you can freeze???..

devine63

  • *
  • Guest

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 15 Feb 2013 11:45PM


"A dent can split the tinplating on the inside of a steel can letting corrosion/chemical reactions happen with the contents."


"Like I said that health scare went out of fashion in the 1980s..."

to the best of my knowledge that one is not a health scare, it is quite correct that there is a health risk from dented cans because it allows the can to rust and also may let air in to the contents, so they go off

regards, Deb

Dic Penderyn

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5228

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 20 Feb 2013 06:00AM
Be careful in what you wish for, God has a sense of humour

devine63

  • *
  • Guest

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 21 Feb 2013 12:23AM
thanks Dic

regards, Deb

AndMac

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 770

Re: Eating well for less!

  • on: 04 Mar 2013 12:49AM
Just reviving this one. There are lots of 'how to eat cheaply' cookbooks around. My own favourite which is still in print is Jocasta Innes' The Paupers' Cookbook.
A good strategy is to cook double and freeze it for things like chilli con carne and spag bol sauce. Saves on fuel.

 For all mince based meals like chilli and spag bol, stretch the mince (I use Quorn mince a lot) with finely grated carrot. It works really well in Spag. Bol and lasagna.

Grated carrot also stretches shop bought coleslaw a lot further - this always has lots of cabbage and dressing but little carrot.

Not eating but. ..you can make your own formula for washing clothes - Google "Laundry Gloop". It can work out as cheaply as 2 pence a machine load. I use my gloop for even heavy duty washing, boosted with Aldi's Almat laundry booster.

If you don't have yeast you can make bread  from flour with sour milk and baking powder. Lemon juice or vinegar can be used to sour the milk. Google 'soda bread'.
 
Pancakes can be used all year round - they make good wraps for spring rolls. Don't forget savoury fillings for them.

When my daughter and granddaughter came for lunch the other week and I had no bread, rolls or crispbread, I made a huge batch of pancakes and these were spread with various sweet and savoury fillings. It made a lovely lunch for the three of us.
« Last Edit: 04 Mar 2013 12:53AM by AndMac »
"I might repeat to myself slowly and soothingly, a list of quotations beautiful from minds profound - if I can remember any of the damn things".

Dorothy Parker