GPs to be paid 33 per patient to assess eligibility for new disability benefit

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auntieCtheM

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You said: "I know rationally that i have a genuine disability". 

I cannot think why a Gp would not listen to you and have your past history on the screen infront of him/her to corroborate what you are saying.  I bet all they do is send you for another test or two.

sherbs

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I shall ask but i am quite open to the fact that im crapping myself. What if he is someone the will lable me as a scounger or worse that im a raving hypochondriac. I know rationally that i have a genuine disability and that i need medication and assistance. I sound so pathetic.
How sad is it.
The secretrary is ok but they always ask to have a reason for the visit.

How on earth can you be a faker if you have a "Brain Injury" a "spinal injury" and attend a pain clinic, just one of these alone makes you disabled (sorry, i couldnt think of a better word)

i am like you, my doc has rung me to say that she hasnt seen me for 6 months and wanted me to come in and make sure i was doing ok,  so i did and was glad, as i had a uti, as she done bloods and wee etc, She said it was a rather bad one, but i am so used to either peeing too much or not enough and have 24 hrs back pain, that i thought this was all normal.

So please do make an appt to see your GP     >hugs<

devine63

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Hi

every doctor's surgery should be offering both urgent and non-urgent appointments.  The non-urgent ones allow the doctors to do some of the work for which the NHS pays the surgery extra money (such as monitoring people's weight and blood pressure, etc.).

I'm lucky, my surgery (which is in central London) has a morning open drop in for all urgent matters every day - usually at least 2 doctors on that and the other 2 doing routine appointments which were booked days before.  AFternoons they all do non-urgent appointments which were booked in advance.
regards, Deb

myrtlemaid

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Im very impressed that some peoples GPs actually ask them to come in ... mine is excellent when I go but has never contacted me to go in.

If i rememberrightly GPs were paid before by the DWP for filling in benefit related forms..it is impportant to visit your GP  once youve sent off the initial form,  tell them youve got a claim in and discuss youre problemswith them so they know andcan fill in the form accurately for you.
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KizzyKazaer

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Quote
Im very impressed that some peoples GPs actually ask them to come in ... mine is excellent when I go but has never contacted me to go in.

I think it might depend on what the condition is/what medication is being used?  I'm not one for visiting a GP if I can help it, so I get reminders stamped on my repeat prescription tear-off slip to make an appointment (for a blood pressure check etc). 

About GPs being paid by the DWP - I always thought this was the case for DLA medical reports as well?

AccessOfficer

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Sorry Monic,
I reurned to work today after being ill for six weeks and reading my emails I had been informed about the GPs being paid to give information to DWP about patients claiming PIP.
I then immediatley posted the news on the Talk board before reading the News and Current Affairs posts. Doh!!
Once again, my apologies.
AO

Sunny Clouds

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Re- your own GP.

Just picking up on something above.  I don't know about the rest of the UK, but in England, you're no longer registered with a specific GP, you're registered with a specific practice.  It's been like this for several years now.  Obviously if it's a single-handed practice, you're registered with that doctor, but if it's a multi-doctor practice, it's a matter for the senior doctor or partners how to allocate the patients and how to allocate form filling.  Since form filling pays extra, in some practices one or more partners will do it all, even if they're not the doctor that usually sees you.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

starsmurf

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In Scotland, you're registered with the practice too.  Because of the way general practice works, I think it's the case in all of the UK.

My dad is a retired GP and I discussed this with him today.  He said that no GP would be unhappy at someone coming in to see them to discuss their health and to talk about reports etc. for benefits.  As long as someone doesn't abuse the emergency appointment system to do so, it's not a misuse of a GP's time.  Your income has a very strong effect on your health.  The stress of the benefits system, especially an appeal, can worsen someone's health, so your GP has a strong interest in getting it right first time.

Also, practices are given targets for seeing certain groups and checking things like blood pressure.  The practice will have money withheld if they don't.  GPs don't actually get the salaries quoted in the tabloids, the NHS pays your practice depending on things like the number of patients they have, plus hitting these targets.  Out of this money, the GPs then have to pay for the salaries of the office staff, the practice manager, the practice nurses etc.  The average GP pays four salaries out of the amount they "get paid" by the NHS.  Then the GP will have to pay for things like the surgery morgage and any money they had to borrow to buy into the partnership.  Only the amount left over should be considered their salary.  So you may help your GP by going in.
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sherbs

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Quote
Im very impressed that some peoples GPs actually ask them to come in ... mine is excellent when I go but has never contacted me to go in.

I think it might depend on what the condition is/what medication is being used?  I'm not one for visiting a GP if I can help it, so I get reminders stamped on my repeat prescription tear-off slip to make an appointment (for a blood pressure check etc). 

About GPs being paid by the DWP - I always thought this was the case for DLA medical reports as well?


That is why my GP left a message on my home ansaphone, to come in and see her for a medication review and routine "hows things going" and bp, urine test.

If i havnt seen my GP within six months then she will ring and leave a messsage to make an appointment to see her.

She is a really good GP, and i feel very fortunate to have her.