GPs to be paid £33 per patient to assess eligibility for new disability benefit

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Monic1511

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http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/your-practice/practice-topics/practice-income/gps-to-be-paid-33-to-assess-eligibility-for-new-disability-benefit/20002594.article#.UWhc7jdc0kk
GPs will be paid £33 to fill out a new form determining whether patients are eligible for the Government’s new personal independence payment (PIP), a scheme the GPC has warned may ‘harass’ patients with a health condition or disability.

The PIP replaced the disability living allowance this week and GPs will be required to give details of the diagnosis, history, variability, treatment and the impact of the condition on the patients’ life, for which they will be paid £33.50 per form.

But the GPC has voiced concern that patients with long term conditions might be periodically ‘harrassed’ under the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) under the new PIP assessment.

To qualify for the payment, patients must have needed help for three months or more and be likely to need help for the next nine months.

A form detailing the claimants own description of how their condition or disability impacts their life, as well as a factual report from a health professional such as a GP will be sent to assessors at ATOS or Capita. PIP assessors can then either order that a face-to-face consultation by a health professional be carried out, or make a recommendation to the DWP about the claimant’s eligibility without this.

The new PIP assessments, will be run by private contractors ATOS - who also run the Work Capability Assessment scheme.
Payments awarded under PIP, will be reviewed ‘at appropriate intervals depending on how likely it is for the claimant’s condition or impairment to change’, the DWP said.

But Dr John Canning, chair of the GPC’s Professional Fees and Regulation committee and a GP in Middlesbrough voiced concern about patients having to continually ‘prove’ they deserve state support.

He said: ‘We don’t want to see people harassed when they have long term chronic illness. Some people are never going to improve. They have a long term illness and they don’t need to be harassed by the system every month to keep proving they can’t do certain things.’

He added: ‘If they target people who really need it then it may be a good thing. But we know that there are plenty of people who don’t claim when they should do, and need a great deal of persuading to claim. All we hear about is the people who claim when they shouldn’t be.’

The DWP said they introduced the new system as the former Disability Living Allowance system was flawed, with patients receiving benefits for life with no systematic assessment of the impact the condition or disability had on their daily life.

A DWP spokesperson said: ‘The Personal Independence Payment will include a new face-to-face assessment and regular reviews - something missing in the current system. This will ensure the billions we spend on the benefit gives more targeted support to those who need it most.’

Interesting ?

lankou

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Give a GP usually charges £200-£250 an hour for non NHS work, £33 is not going to be much time.

Danslatete

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I dont see a gp regularly. I get who ever has a slot on the day im in need. I cant have my brain fixed with surgery, so no consultant there, it cant be fixed with medication, so no consults there, I see a brian injury man not even once a year these days. I have open referals for the clinics for when ever the need arises.
My meds are sorted at pain clinic, they are fo the spinal injury which is less disabling than the brain injury.
The social work had a heavy involvement at first but step back as you are rehabed to the function level where you level off. So i have a care manager with an open referal if i need help, but i havent seen them in at least two years.
Not sure how i will ever get the back up i need. I had the help of welfare ights and support worker and social worker for the dla.
I dont know what the doctor im registered with looks like.  There is nothing that can be fixed, there is nothing that needs watched, its broke it wont get better and ive been helped to be the best i can be, i still need the help of my family and work collegues to manages my day.
So how does someone like me get a fair assessment? I only go to doctors when im so ill i cant function, i hate doctors due to spending the greater part of 3 years being treated prodded tested and poked and rehabbed.

auntieCtheM

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Maybe Danslatete you could soon feel the need for a general check-up just to confirm that all is OK???

devine63

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Hi danslatete and Auntie

I agree with that suggestion - since any assessment will go to your registered doctor, it would be worth asking for a non-urgent routine double appointment with your "own" Gp and take with you a written description summarising your clinical history and describing the difficulties you have day to day - make a point of mentioning the things we know are in the PIP criteria (see elsewhere on this board)  - so that it can be added to your file of notes.  Then spend the time with the GP getting to know him a bit, telling him about the problems these benefit changes are causing and that you wanted to make sure he knows who you are so that he can complete the forms when the time comes.  Get him to do some rouine checkup stuff whilst you are there - blood pressure, routine blood tests, etc
regards, Deb

Danslatete

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Would this not just be abusing the appointments? I thought you were only supposed to go if you were ill? There is always a wait/fight for for appointments and i would feel guilty. It might seem to him that i was just trying to butter him up for benefits and i would be scared it would backfire and he would refuse to fill it in.
Im scared of rubbing him up the wrong way. is it wrong?

oldtone27

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It seems to me perfectly reasonable that if your GP is to asked to comment on your medical condition, that you can ensure he/she is up to date with that condition and its history.

So an appointment for that purpose might well be necessary and could not be objected to.

Monic1511

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Danslatete

Im always telling people to go to their GP's especially when they are applying for a benefit - just a check up to let the doctor know all the current health problems and even to check if meds are up to date.  If the GP hasn't seen someone for a while they can't give decent answers to the dwp SO I would ask for a appointment & when you go to see the doc just tell them you wanted to update them on how you were - sort of an annual check up (MOT)  ;-)
Monic

ATurtle

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I am more and more glad that I have such an amazing relationship with my GP.  So good in fact that when I showed him my Atos Report he said, "Who is this about, it's not you"

Keeping in touch (about every six months) is a good idea, even if it's to ask the GP for a quick once over to check blood pressure etc. or to check you are on the best meds.
Tony.

"I choose not to place "DIS", in my ability." - Robert M. Hensel

auntieCtheM

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After all we are supposed to get to the dentist every 6 months for a check-up, so why not the Gp too?  It is not taking advantage it is being sensible with your health.

devine63

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Hi Danslatete

you have the same impression as many people do about doctors' appointments and it is (as others have said) not correct.   Urgent appointments withing the next 48 hours are for specific illness or immediate problems.  But if you emphasise (by phoning in the afternoon and by saying "I want to make a routine, non-urgent appointment t see Dr. XX") that you are wanting a non-urgent appointment and ask if it is possible to have a double appointment so that there is time to both discuss the things you want (you don't have to telll the receptionist what) and allows time for the routine checks on blood pressure, medication, etc..   It is likely you will have to wait a week or possibly two for such an appointment, but it should be possible to get one,
regards, Deb

ATurtle

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Coo Deb, you have a lovely surgery.

To see my GP, I have to tell the receptionist that I have acute nasopharyngitis (or similar) to get to see him.  I once wanted to make a double non-urgent appointment to see him, I had to arrange a telephone consultation with him and then ask him to get his receptionist to make it. 

I got to the surgery on the appointed date and time and OMG!!!  "Oh, you're the awkward one!" to which I replied, "No, I'm the one that needed to speak to the doctor on a non-urgent matter that has no concern of yours."

When I spoke to the GP he said he'd heard about the Common Cold I was suffering from and assumed it wasn't that that I wanted to talk to him about!  Strangely, after that episode, my GPs surgery, for me, has changed for the better.  He has started to block out specific time during the week for "non-urgent doubles".  If you talk to your GP then they may even have this facility.
Tony.

"I choose not to place "DIS", in my ability." - Robert M. Hensel

Danslatete

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I shall ask but i am quite open to the fact that im crapping myself. What if he is someone the will lable me as a scounger or worse that im a raving hypochondriac. I know rationally that i have a genuine disability and that i need medication and assistance. I sound so pathetic.
How sad is it.
The secretrary is ok but they always ask to have a reason for the visit.

NeuralgicNeurotic

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Danslatete >bighugs<

I doubt if you're the first person facing this situation that your GP will have seen.

One Girl and her Big Dog

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The secretrary is ok but they always ask to have a reason for the visit.


They have to ask, but you don't have to tell!  The receptionists at my surgery always say "can I ask what it's about" usually I happy to tell them , but when it was something I found embarrasing I said "i'd rather discuss it with the Dr", and they were ok with that. 

1G