Author Topic: DLA Anxiety  (Read 5039 times)

devine63

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #15 on: 10 May 2014 10:28AM »
Hi Feehutch

don't let them keep you waiting more than a few days for a needs assessment - there is a statutory requirement for them to complete the needs assessment within a certain period starting from your request.

The info on grants to get home adaptations is here: https://www.gov.uk/disabled-facilities-grants 

regards, Deb

feehutch

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #16 on: 10 May 2014 11:45AM »
Thank you everyone for continuing to talk to me  >bighugs<

The letter I have confirming they would assess me is dated 17 March and says they will endeavour to do it within 3 months.  The woman I spoke to said the same thing.
I am debating ringing and asking for a social worker assessment to see if I can have more help at home because when my husband is at work I end up just sat watching TV and eating crap because cooking is hard.  If I do I will ask again about the adaptations appointment.  I don't know about asking for a carer though.  Having someone around I don't know and sitting there while they do stuff for me.  I'm still getting used to needing a wheelchair, getting outside care would be a massive thing to deal with.  My husband is already struggling and I don't want to drop more on him just now  :-(
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devine63

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #17 on: 10 May 2014 10:29PM »
Hi Feehutch

they should be able to assess your kitchen for access improvements as well as your bathroom: work surfaces can be lowered (or can be adjustable at the touch of a button) and there are all kinds of other adaptations which are possible, depending on what you find difficult precisely.   There are some gadgets and things which caan help if you want to cook yourself.
regards, Deb

Sunshine Meadows

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #18 on: 11 May 2014 10:14AM »
The help you get does depend on where you live and the budgets they have but your level of disability does mean it is worth asking for everything you can and then see what happens.

From my experience I think that if you can be given a way of staying independent eg a walk in shower rather than having a carer come in the Occupational Therapist will chose the former.

I think owning your own home albeit it will often still be mortgaged can make it easier to make physical changes as compared to a private landlord. We live in a terrace and got a grant for a shower room, floor leveling at the back of the house and wider doorways downstairs. If we move withing ten years of the grant being given we have to pay a proportion back. It did take three years to come through, I think because it was so much work and not just putting a shower in an existing room.

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I'm still getting used to needing a wheelchair, getting outside care would be a massive thing to deal with.

I agree it is hard  >bighugs<

feehutch

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #19 on: 12 May 2014 11:58AM »
Maybe they will be more inclined to do other things like put in a shower and modify the kitchen then.  I think I'd prefer that to someone coming in.  I used to do that sort of work and I still struggle in some situations being the service user rather than service provider.

I nearly rolled into someone elses car yesterday and got tipped out on a dropped curb.  On one hand I am getting less muscle pain from wheeling myself and on the other things like that make me more anxious about going out not less.
Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.
- Ferris Buller

neurochick

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #20 on: 12 May 2014 04:09PM »
Fee
I have made some suggestions for you about wheelchair skills on another thread on Talk. Obviously I won't repeat here but have a look and hopefully it will be of some help to you.

feehutch

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #21 on: 12 May 2014 04:31PM »
Thank you  >hugs<
Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.
- Ferris Buller

Sunshine Meadows

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #22 on: 14 May 2014 04:01PM »

devine63

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #23 on: 15 May 2014 09:30PM »
Hi Feehutch

maybe you can try to think of it as incidents like that mean you need more practice at going out?   The more experience you have of times when all goes well when you go out, the less anxious you should be about going out.

As for the carer thing: if you can bear it, accept having a carer until such time as the bathroom and kitchen can be adapted: the additional expense of them paying the carer might just act as an incentive to them to get the adaptations done more quickly.

When the assessor comes out: ask how long it takes from the needs assessment to getting the adaptations completed, then when she says 2 years or 10 weeks or whatever it is in your area ask why does it take so long?  It is only a few days' work to a decent builder?  And ask what usually are the main hold ups in the process.   If she says the hold up is getting the money released to pay for it,. then you can work on that (local councillor or MP may be able to help by putting pressure on, for example).

regards, Deb

Fiz

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #24 on: 16 May 2014 03:06AM »
I was told the work would be done for my DHP in 6-12 weeks and it turned out to be 18 months! I guess all the critical need cases that are taken on always get done first so substantials like mine, always wait. I think it was money because once the ball finally got moving they employed a local builder/plumber who had availability and that took no time at all. It never occured to me that asking councillors/MP's to act might have shortened the wait. I still remember crying with joy when washing my hair without pain for the first time! A happy memory, so it is worth the wait.

feehutch

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Re: DLA Anxiety
« Reply #25 on: 16 May 2014 09:20AM »
Thanks for all your advice guys.  I am waiting a couple more weeks and then if I don't have an assessment date I am going to ask about having a care assessment too.  I think you could be right.  If I ask for a carer to help me get in and out of the bath maybe they will decide I can have a shower rather than just grab rails.  We have a shower hose that attaches to the taps so to wash my hair I have to kneel at the side of the bath and wash my hair as best I can and that is painful and ineffective so I really get that feeling of joy Fiz :)
Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.
- Ferris Buller