Simon Stevens at it again.

  • 26 Replies
  • 11520 Views

lankou

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2953

Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 01:47PM

Sunny Clouds

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4833

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 02:20PM
"If you think you can work, you will work, and for everyone you can show me in a specific situation who feels unable to work, I can show you someone able to work."

I'd like to drag him forceably into my nearest dementia unit.  No, not just people he might feel happy to excuse work, the old wrinklies we assume are past working, but the working age people with dementia.  And working age lasts longer than some people think, with the retirement ages rising.

Yes, there are people who not only think they can work, they think they do work.  But will they work?  Not a chance in hell. 

And those with still enough insight to think they're unable to work?  They might possibly work for a few more months, but the chances of anyone recruiting them is a bit slim.  "I see you'd like to work for us.  Where do you see yourself in a year's time?" "I can't bear to think of that.  It's just too frightening.   But not here.  Maybe rotting in my own home with 4 x 15 minute visits a day, or maybe, if my savings will stretch that far or I've deteriorated far enough, with round-the-clock care."

Yes, of course they'd be given a job.

No, I'm not dissing people with dementia, and the progress varies wildly.  Some people can and do work beyond the diagnosis, but how many and for how long?

Ditto some forms of severe autism, some forms of very low intelligence and some forms of brain damage.  Conditions that can severely impair one's ability to behave appropriately with others, to follow instructions, to understand all sorts of  basic things.  What work can they do?  Yes, there will be some.  The autistic savant, the person with low intelligence but some other chance skill/ability such as the ability to taste products such as tea or wine or cat food to ensure consistency, the person whose brain is damaged in a potted way and...oh you know what I'm on about.

But what  >steam< planet is this man on?

You all know here that I'm watching someone close to me get more and more demented, that I'm terrified of the same happening to me.  I can remember my nan being, um, peculiar when she was 64.  I can remember her, aged 67, sitting in a urine saturated chair and confusing me with my mother, thinking I was her son's wife, when I was eight.  If they don't change the rules, my scheduled retirement age is 68.

And over the years I've known people with other impairments of that severity and unemployability.  Surely Simon Stevens has?  It's not a word I use lightly (other than making obvious jokes) but I think he's delusional.  He's spent so many years trying to convince people who didn't believe him that he could be a full member of society and that he could work, that his argument has been reduced to not "I can and I'll prove it" but "anyone can and you should just accept it".

I know you shouldn't write people off.   Some years ago, I had brain scans.  I was struggling mentally at the time but others were with me when the consultant tried to explain it.  I caught phrases like severely atrophied, large holes etc.  Then someone with me fixed her beady eye on him and asked whether there was anything that couldn't be congenital.  He said there wasn't.

So I know from what I've been told that my brain looked worse on a scan than my father's did when he was positively and unambiguously diagnosed with dementia.  I have less brain.  But that doesn't mean that what I have is of no use.

So I don't write someone off just because they seem not to have all the relevant parts and functions.

But my anger over this assertion of Stevens' is causing my brain to overflow with moddable expletives.  And I don't think that's because my brain doesn't work properly, I think it's because there's a defect in his thinking.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Offworld

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 552

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 02:57PM
 
 >angry<  What a system-sycophant.
But once his transient utility to those who misrule has expired .....   >devil<

ditchdwellers

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3010

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 03:02PM
"If you think you can work, you will work, and for everyone you can show me in a specific situation who feels unable to work, I can show you someone able to work."

 I think it's because there's a defect in his thinking.

I couldn't agree with you more. I find his opinions vile, and find it hard to understand the basis of them.

KizzyKazaer

  • *
  • Global Moderator
  • Super Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8793

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 05:24PM
Didn't bother to read the full article, I've only just got rid of a headache that lasted four days, so no desire to re-activate it  >doh<

Like your comment, Lankou  - '(he is) the disabled version of Katie Hopkins and just as obnoxious' - neatly summarised  >thumbsup<




lankou

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2953

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 05:38PM


Like your comment, Lankou  - '(he is) the disabled version of Katie Hopkins and just as obnoxious' - neatly summarised  >thumbsup<

I thought it apt.

NeuralgicNeurotic

  • *
  • Charter Member and Volunteer
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7373

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 05:52PM
It's safe tosay that that article has done nothing to change myu opinion of Stevens as a useful idiot.

Fiz

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4121

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 06:45PM
What does this man do for his full time job? He can't write drivel full time for a living can he?

Sunny Clouds

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4833

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 08:08PM
He would appear to be still working as a self-employed 'disability consultant'

http://simonstevens.com/

He was in Spazticus.  I don't know whether that's still running?
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Sunny Clouds

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4833

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 08:14PM
If you want a giggle, read his wikipedia entry.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Stevens

If ever I saw a thin entry that had been doctored by someone or their mates to big them up, that was it.  The reason I mention it is that it's been done so very clumsily which made me laugh.

Compare with the entry for Stephen Hawking. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hawking

Lots of solid qualifications and publications, no self-aggrandisement.

(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

Prabhakari

  • *
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3328

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 08:14PM
I tried very hard to work for as long as possible.
I kept collapsing.
Bless 'em all, bless 'em all,
The long and the short and the tall.

Sunny Clouds

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4833

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 08:31PM
That's no excuse.  Simon Stephens, the great spokesman and expert on disability says that if you think you can work, you can; and that if you think you can't work, you can.

Therefore you can work.

Good luck finding anyone that wants to employ someone that keeps collapsing.

I find when people try to guilt trip me over not working (and I'm easily guilt-tripped), it helps to ask them whether they'd be happy to employ me and what adjustments they'd like to make.

Maybe Simon would like to employ you himself.  I'm sure a reasonable adjustment would be a hoist and a recovery room.

Having said that, if there were an official post for the spreading of gentleness, you'd be my nomination for it.  I know it's soppy to say it, but I find your posts, here and elsewhere, soothing.
(I'm an obsessive problem-solver, so feel free to ignore any suggestions or solutions I offer, even if they sound terribly insistent.)

auntieCtheM

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Super Hero Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5745

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 08:58PM
The best bit of the wiki entry:

"within the disability community itself, Stevens is something of an outsider whose views do not reflect those of the majority. Indeed, to many he is nothing but a troublesome irrelevance.[5][6]"

Fizzbw

  • *
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 926

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 19 Apr 2015 10:16PM
There are a lot of disabled people who could do cosines work, myself being one of them. But for whom? And making how much money? The system in all its forms precludes this.

Being able to do a little bit of "work" is irrelevant if it can't keep you.

The old emphasis on work being the be all. We all know it's not.

Fx

Fiz

  • *
  • Charter Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4121

Re: Simon Stevens at it again.

  • on: 20 Apr 2015 01:48AM
Universal credit may affect him when it does come in. At the moment self employed people can submit their earnings to hmrc and they received the appropriate wtc top up, obviously someone with a disability only has to work 16 hours to qualify for tax credits. But when uc comes in, it will be assumed that you have been receiving minimum wage for the hours you need to have worked so he'll only get a uc top up from 16 X minimum hourly wage. If he doesn't earn that much, tough cookie, according to the new uc rules and rather than a uc top up he will be expected to sign on to jcp and fulfil his job seeking requirements to get any uc top up on top of his self employed earnings. 

I'm really worried about a friend who I think is going to be scuppered by uc. She has massive social anxiety and rarely leaves the house, the few rare occasions are accompanied by her son. She's applied for dla in the past but I suspect didn't fill the form in adequately so was turned down and didn't have the spoons to fight it. Currently she makes bears and sells them via the Internet,  working from home. Mostly at night as her sleep is poor. She submits her earnings to hmrc and she gets wtc which she lives off because the money made from bears isn't much. When uc arrives she will only get uc on top of the expected income of minimum wage X 30 hours a week which she doesn't earn anything like. She won't be able to live. According to the new rules when people claim uc anyone not earning the minimum wage for their hours when self employed will be required to sign onto jsa and fulfill the job seeking agreement to look for additional work alongside their business. She would never manage to visit the jcp. I worry about people like her who have done their best to manage.